• Crusader Kings III Available Now!

    The realm rejoices as Paradox Interactive announces the launch of Crusader Kings III, the latest entry in the publisher’s grand strategy role-playing game franchise. Advisors may now jockey for positions of influence and adversaries should save their schemes for another day, because on this day Crusader Kings III can be purchased on Steam, the Paradox Store, and other major online retailers.


    Real Strategy Requires Cunning

canonized

Heartbreaker
68 Badges
Oct 10, 2006
5.917
7
forum.paradoxplaza.com
  • Crusader Kings II: Horse Lords
  • Victoria: Revolutions
  • Rome Gold
  • Victoria 2
  • Victoria 2: A House Divided
  • Victoria 2: Heart of Darkness
  • 200k Club
  • 500k Club
  • Cities: Skylines
  • Europa Universalis IV: El Dorado
  • Europa Universalis IV: Pre-order
  • Crusader Kings II: Way of Life
  • Europa Universalis IV: Common Sense
  • Europa Universalis IV: Res Publica
  • Cities: Skylines - After Dark
  • Europa Universalis IV: Cossacks
  • Crusader Kings II: Conclave
  • Europa Universalis IV: Mare Nostrum
  • Stellaris
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Cadet
  • Crusader Kings II: Reapers Due
  • Europa Universalis IV: Rights of Man
  • Tyranny: Archon Edition
  • Stellaris: Leviathans Story Pack
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Together for Victory
  • Crusader Kings III
  • Europa Universalis III Complete
  • Hearts of Iron II: Armageddon
  • Crusader Kings II
  • Crusader Kings II: Charlemagne
  • Crusader Kings II: Legacy of Rome
  • Crusader Kings II: The Old Gods
  • Crusader Kings II: Rajas of India
  • Crusader Kings II: The Republic
  • Crusader Kings II: Sons of Abraham
  • Crusader Kings II: Sunset Invasion
  • Crusader Kings II: Sword of Islam
  • Europa Universalis III
  • Europa Universalis III: Chronicles
  • Divine Wind
  • Europa Universalis IV: Art of War
  • Europa Universalis IV: Conquest of Paradise
  • Europa Universalis IV: Wealth of Nations
  • Hearts of Iron III: Their Finest Hour
  • Hearts of Iron III Collection
  • Heir to the Throne
  • Europa Universalis III Complete
  • Leviathan: Warships
  • March of the Eagles

Welcome to the AARLANDER , AARland's monthly publication ! If you would like to write for the AARlander , contact canonized or English Patriot - everyone is welcome ! Also , what's the best way to support the AARlander aside from writing ? Give comments ! Put your comments in the AARlander: Comments and Discussion Thread for our writers to read !​

Code:
[I][U][B]Editor in Chief and Cover Artist [/B][/U][/I]: 
canonized

[I][U][B]Editor[/b][/u][/i]:
English Patriot

[I][U][B]Assistant Editors on Staff[/B][/U][/I]: 
General_BT  Estonianzulu

[i][u][b]Secretary[/b][/u][/i]:
Avernite

[I][u][b]Contributors for This Month[/b][/u][/I]: 
robou   canonized   Darth JF  Degeme  Qorten
Capibara   trekaddict   Eber  theHyphenated1
phargle  snugglie   semetary   spl   comagoosie

[I][U][b]Other Writers or Contributors on Staff[/b][/U][/I]: 
Judas Maccabeus  LeonTrotsky  Hajji Giray I       TreizeV
JimboIX  VILenin  Grubnessul  jeffg006   Myth   grayghost   Kurt_Steiner  Cyrus_The_Great
Mettermrck  DerKaiser  KanaX   Alfred Packer   AlexanderPrimus   Atlantic Friend
Code:
[B][U]TABLE OF CONTENTS[/U][/B]

AARland Choice AwAARds Q2 Results Issue

[B]Part I: AARLAND CHOICE AWAARDS[/B]
   [anchorlink=I1]ACA Results by phargle[/anchorlink]
   [anchorlink=I2]Nothing like the ACAs by comagoosie[/anchorlink]
   [anchorlink=I3]You've Been Canonized: EUROO7 by canonized[/anchorlink]

[B]PART II: AUGUST IN AARLAND[/B]
   [anchorlink=I4]The Month of Augustus by DarthJF[/anchorlink]
   [anchorlink=I5]The Wilting of the White Rose: The Battle of Bosworth Field by Eber[/anchorlink]
   
[B]Part III: AUTHOR'S WORKSHOP[/B]
   [anchorlink=I6]Music and Inspiration by Snugglie[/anchorlink]
   [anchorlink=I7]The Spirit of the Rules by thehyphenated1[/anchorlink]
   
[b]Part IV: THE AARLANDER LIFESTYLE[/b]
   [anchorlink=I8]The Guess the Author thread by robou[/anchorlink]
   [anchorlink=I9]The Southern Road to War: a "Confederate Armageddon Mod" by trekaddict[/anchorlink]
   [anchorlink=I10]The Weekly AwAARds for July 2008! by spl[/anchorlink]

[b]Part V: THE HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE[/b]
   [anchorlink=I11]The Thirty Year’s War by Qorten[/anchorlink]
   [anchorlink=I12]Post World War Two Iran by Sematary[/anchorlink]
   
[b]Part VI: THE HISPANOAMERICAN CORNER[/B]
   [anchorlink=I13]The Latin American Boom by Capibara[/anchorlink]
   [anchorlink=I14]But what about Russia? by Degeme[/anchorlink]
Code:
[b][u]Previous AARlander and INSTRUMENTALITY Editons[/U][/B]

[thread=364263] The AARLander Issue #10 July 2008[/thread]
[thread=359869] The AARlander Issue #9 June 2008[/thread]
[thread=354778] The AARlander Issue #8 May ACA Results Issue[/thread]
[thread=349326] AARlander Issue #7 April 2008[[/thread]
[URL=http://forum.paradoxplaza.com/forum/showthread.php?t=344752] Instrumentality March[/URL]
[thread=340744] The AARlander Issue #6: February 2008[/thread]
[thread=336567] The AARlander Issue #5: January 2008[/thread]
[thread=332878] The AARlander Issue #4: December 2007[/thread]
[thread=329391] The AARlander Issue #3: November 2007 [/thread]
[thread=316106] The AARlander Issue #2: August 2007[/thread]
[thread=311400] The AARlander Issue #1: July 2007[/thread]
 
Last edited:

canonized

Heartbreaker
68 Badges
Oct 10, 2006
5.917
7
forum.paradoxplaza.com
  • Crusader Kings II: Horse Lords
  • Victoria: Revolutions
  • Rome Gold
  • Victoria 2
  • Victoria 2: A House Divided
  • Victoria 2: Heart of Darkness
  • 200k Club
  • 500k Club
  • Cities: Skylines
  • Europa Universalis IV: El Dorado
  • Europa Universalis IV: Pre-order
  • Crusader Kings II: Way of Life
  • Europa Universalis IV: Common Sense
  • Europa Universalis IV: Res Publica
  • Cities: Skylines - After Dark
  • Europa Universalis IV: Cossacks
  • Crusader Kings II: Conclave
  • Europa Universalis IV: Mare Nostrum
  • Stellaris
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Cadet
  • Crusader Kings II: Reapers Due
  • Europa Universalis IV: Rights of Man
  • Tyranny: Archon Edition
  • Stellaris: Leviathans Story Pack
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Together for Victory
  • Crusader Kings III
  • Europa Universalis III Complete
  • Hearts of Iron II: Armageddon
  • Crusader Kings II
  • Crusader Kings II: Charlemagne
  • Crusader Kings II: Legacy of Rome
  • Crusader Kings II: The Old Gods
  • Crusader Kings II: Rajas of India
  • Crusader Kings II: The Republic
  • Crusader Kings II: Sons of Abraham
  • Crusader Kings II: Sunset Invasion
  • Crusader Kings II: Sword of Islam
  • Europa Universalis III
  • Europa Universalis III: Chronicles
  • Divine Wind
  • Europa Universalis IV: Art of War
  • Europa Universalis IV: Conquest of Paradise
  • Europa Universalis IV: Wealth of Nations
  • Hearts of Iron III: Their Finest Hour
  • Hearts of Iron III Collection
  • Heir to the Throne
  • Europa Universalis III Complete
  • Leviathan: Warships
  • March of the Eagles
[anchor=I1]ACA Results[/anchor]

by phargle

Another round of the beloved AARland Choice Awards has come and gone. Q2 was an exciting time, with many intense and close contests. I will skip right to the results rather than give you some sort of witty introduction because canonized will beat me otherwise. I do so hate the beatings.

Rome - Rome if you want to

The big new category this time around is Rome, which had an impressive showing for being such a young game. English Patriot won the Overall and Narrative categories with I, Silvagenus - A Rome AAR, with comagoosie going home with silver in both categories for his For Rome's Honor. This, by the way, was a trend followed in every category; except for a unique upset in Crusader Kings, the AAR that won narrative won Favorite Overall every time. Alfred Packer laughed all the way to the bank with his The Adventures of House Eurpontid, which finished as comedies are wont to do way, way out in front. Favorite History-Book went to TreizeV for "King of Kings" - An Arche Seleukeia AAR which finished comfortably ahead of crusaderknight and Regnum Iudaeorum - The Lost Ten Tribes Of Israel. And gameplay wound up being a tie; The Die Is Cast - Caesar's Civil War (705 AUC) and Colchis - A New Dawn Approaches, by Rensslaer and Jaspume respectively, each earned five votes.

EU3 - Hey you guys

In EU3, some horrible jerk who never gives me a second helping of soup and is always threatening to send me back to the orphanage wrote something called Timelines: What if Spain Failed to Control the World? , which won Overall and Narrative with a bazillion votes. In Overall, A Greater Netherlands - IN Brabant AAR by FYROM put up an honorable fight and landed in second place, while Capibara did similarly in Narrative with his Italy: Tales of Friendship, Treason, Love and Death. Comedy was much closer as Grubnessul narrowly held on to the title with There might be Vikings out there! Or: how I accidentally traded my wife for a halibut , with EUR007 and The Papal State:A Mission AAR for EUIII (In Nomine) getting the silver. History-Book was even closer, resulting in an eleven-to-eleven tie between A Greater Netherlands - IN Brabant AAR by FYROM and The Ebony Cross and the Sacred Eagle (Era I) by rcduggan. EUR007 did win something though due to getting over twenty votes in the gameplay category for The Papal State:A Mission AAR for EUIII (In Nomine). Remember TreizeV? He wasn't done . . .

HoI1/2 - Oi Oi Oi

In Hearts of Iron, Resistance: Fall of Man - An Oral History by TreizeV emerged as the overall winner after a very tight contest, maintaining a slim lead over The Setting Sun - Gotterdammerung, Japan 1944 and Weltkriegschaft. This was due in no small measure to TreizeV solidly winning the Narrative category as well, edging out Weltkriegschaft there by six votes. The Comedy award was overwhelmingly won by blue emu's The Game (a German Mod-34 AAR) , confirming the ongoing trend that comedy victories tend to be routes. The History-Book category was close, as is typical in these votes; Trouble in the East - WiF Japan AAR by Klaipedietis beat soonerborn0524's Lesser of Two Evils: Germany in a Draka World by only one vote. That leaves gameplay, where Remble ruled supreme with The Setting Sun - Gotterdammerung, Japan 1944., which mastered all comers with a whopping ten vote lead as voters rallied to his final chapter.

Crusader Kings - For neither crusaders nor kings

An interesting and unique situation emerged in which the overall winner in Crusader Kings did not win any other category - a result that is atypical of usual voter behavior in the ACA. That's because General_BT and Rome AARisen - a Byzantine AAR squeaked out the narrowest of victories against a really crummy AAR that we won't even mention because it's very crummy and the author can't say its name without bursting into chest-heaving sobs. The anamolous result was due to an upset victory in the narrative category (see that narrative trend?), where Snugglie prevailed over General_BT by just two votes with his Lotharingia -- A tale of resurrection. Comedy saw an old champion return as voters broke in favor of Knud Knýtling, Prince of Denmark (and other assorted tales) by the most awesome person ever, who is by the way also very handsome and witty according to three out of four phargle-mothers, with newcomer MechTheDane taking second place with the aptly-named You Godwin son, and you lose some: A Family Saga - a contest that was repeated in the Gameplay category, where the Knýtlings led the Godwinesons by a comfortable margin. History-Book was a tie - it's always a tie - between Heaven On Earth: Part One by asd21593 and the very tidy completion of IamWhoa's Kerne Theory. Whoa.

Vicky - Hey Vicky

Vicky saw DerKaiser's The Golden Nation- California (VIP) AAR take gold with a respectable win over robou and 'I'm sorry, but you're not the only one...' in both Overall and Narrative. The Comedy award went home with the writer of phargle is a totally awesome pope, the identity of which we may never know, for the AAR that was started and finished entirely in Q2, while Actinguy and his parody The Dumb-As-Rocks Girl And The Ahistorical Class landed second. robou continued his tour d'awards with a win in History-Book by Carefully Applied Force: A Prussian AAR, which led "The Footsteps of Illustrious Men"- USA GC AAR by Estonianzulu by four votes. Gameplay was the close category here; robou won again with another AAR, The Rocky Road Northwards: The Story of Italy at War, triumphing over runner-up Quirinus308 and The World is Not Enough, a German WW1 AAR by just two votes.

EU1/2 - Do EU really 1/2 make me cry?

EU1/2 stayed small this quarter. The vowel-deprived Mettermrck and Emperor_krk tied for the Overall winner because The Eagles of Avalon and Dreams of a Baltic State - Pomerania AAR each received five votes. The Eagles of Avalon won (you guessed it) Narrative as well in a route, scoring with nine votes the biggest win in the EU1/2 category. Comedy went home with EU1 AAR Genghis Returns by Duke of Wellington, with runners-up Golden Horde - Scourge From The East (also by Duke of Wellington, finished this quarter) and Will the real Khanate please stand up – A Chagatai AAR by The Swert getting a vote apiece. Emperor_krk won History-Book with Dreams of a Baltic State - Pomerania AAR and nearly broke the Overall-Narrative trend, while Duke of Wellington won Gameplay with Golden Horde - Scourge From The East's swan song.

Overalls - Clothes you can be naked under

The Favorite Graphics category saw a very close fight to the finish between two Crusader Kings AARs, and ultimately Chronicles of the Golden Cross by AlexanderPrimus eked out a win twelve to ten over MechTheDane's You Godwin son, and you lose some: A Family Saga. The battle in Favorite New Writer was also in one category, this one EU3, and it was between Gameplay colossus EUR007 and History-Book co-champ FYROM. These two capital combatants ended up separated by four votes as EUR007 prevailed with The Papal State:A Mission AAR for EUIII (In Nomine) over A Greater Netherlands - IN Brabant AAR[/url] We had a hundred and two voters this time, blowing past the seventy voters we had for 2008 Q1.

In the twenty-five main categories that had votes last time, ten were won by returning champions continuing streaks and fifteen saw the previous champions toppled. A lot of those new victories were by first-time writers too. Congratulations to all the winners! And congratulations to everybody who got votes! This was one of the more hotly-contested voting rounds in awhile and a lot of the contests were decided by just a vote or two. So say something nice about the winners, keep commenting, and most of all keep writing, because next time it could be you!

- - -

For added fun, go back and read comagoosie's predictions for Q2!

Phargle is the author of Knud Knýtling, Prince of Denmark (and other assorted tales)
 

canonized

Heartbreaker
68 Badges
Oct 10, 2006
5.917
7
forum.paradoxplaza.com
  • Crusader Kings II: Horse Lords
  • Victoria: Revolutions
  • Rome Gold
  • Victoria 2
  • Victoria 2: A House Divided
  • Victoria 2: Heart of Darkness
  • 200k Club
  • 500k Club
  • Cities: Skylines
  • Europa Universalis IV: El Dorado
  • Europa Universalis IV: Pre-order
  • Crusader Kings II: Way of Life
  • Europa Universalis IV: Common Sense
  • Europa Universalis IV: Res Publica
  • Cities: Skylines - After Dark
  • Europa Universalis IV: Cossacks
  • Crusader Kings II: Conclave
  • Europa Universalis IV: Mare Nostrum
  • Stellaris
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Cadet
  • Crusader Kings II: Reapers Due
  • Europa Universalis IV: Rights of Man
  • Tyranny: Archon Edition
  • Stellaris: Leviathans Story Pack
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Together for Victory
  • Crusader Kings III
  • Europa Universalis III Complete
  • Hearts of Iron II: Armageddon
  • Crusader Kings II
  • Crusader Kings II: Charlemagne
  • Crusader Kings II: Legacy of Rome
  • Crusader Kings II: The Old Gods
  • Crusader Kings II: Rajas of India
  • Crusader Kings II: The Republic
  • Crusader Kings II: Sons of Abraham
  • Crusader Kings II: Sunset Invasion
  • Crusader Kings II: Sword of Islam
  • Europa Universalis III
  • Europa Universalis III: Chronicles
  • Divine Wind
  • Europa Universalis IV: Art of War
  • Europa Universalis IV: Conquest of Paradise
  • Europa Universalis IV: Wealth of Nations
  • Hearts of Iron III: Their Finest Hour
  • Hearts of Iron III Collection
  • Heir to the Throne
  • Europa Universalis III Complete
  • Leviathan: Warships
  • March of the Eagles
[anchor=I2]Nothing like the ACAs[/anchor]
By comagoosie

By now, the AARland Choice Awards (ACA as it is commonly called) are now wrapping up. We can all say that this has been a thrilling time, like the many other ACAs over the years. And we can all say that each and every ACA gets our hearts thumping. The thrill of seeing a new vote cast, the suspense when we realize that they voted for us, and the drama as we notice how close the race to victory really is.

All in all, we: new writers, experienced ones, and old-timers, can say that we enjoy the ACAs. There is nothing similar like it out there. The scope is huge and it encompasses every AAR out there written in the quarter. It is the biggest event in AARland and every author looks forward to its coming. Sometimes, to take advantage of the timing, authors will do more to gain that one or two votes that will give them the lead. Haven’t you seen posters and links advertising one’s AAR. I know I have, partly because I have done so.

Here are my interviews of three forum members of their view on the ACAs. I asked each, differing questions, to try to get as many questions possible answered across numerous personalities and lifestyles.



robou

I interviewed robou when he didn’t know I was, so the results are pure and uncut, but at the same time, I think I increased his paranoia for undercover interviewing.

Comagoosie: Would you say with the upcoming ACA that you try harder to please your readers?

robou: Nope. I try and keep a high quality throughout. I won't up the ante (so to speak) because people would feel let down after the ACAs have gone

Comagoosie: True, what about the interval between updates? Are you trying to write more updates faster?

robou: Nope, again for the same reasons and if people begin reading through after they see me win the ACAs (purely speculative) then they will be less likely to do so if they have a ton to catch up on

Comagoosie: So you feel that there isn't the certain competitiveness in the ACAs?

robou: How do you mean that?

Comagoosie: Well, the ACA only comes around 4 times a year, so wouldn't you say that authors want to take advantage of that and commit a lot of time writing updates that take more effort?

robou: Not at all. If you can write good quality in less rather than spamming people with too much information, it is a much better read.

Comagoosie: So would you say there is a limit to how many updates you can put out in a timeframe?

robou: I could put out as many as I liked. There is only so much time, however, readers are willing to give to reading

Comagoosie: Too true. Sometimes if an author writes an especially large update, it may take a reader a large chunk of their free time to read it.

robou is the proud author of [thread=357192] 'I'm sorry, but you're not the only one...' [/thread] and [thread=363851] Carefully Applied Force: A Prussian AAR [/thread]



TheHyphenated1

Comagoosie: You were tied alongside 3 others in last ACA for HOI 2 Narrative, are you doing anything to gain the one or two votes that will make a difference?

TheHyphenated1: That honestly comes as something of a surprise to me. I thought I was tied with just rcduggan's Kathmandu Can Do. No? At any rate, I wouldn't say that I'm consciously doing anything to get an "edge". I've put a link to the awards in my signature, but this primarily to increase overall participation.

Comagoosie: Since the ACA is here, are trying to push more updates out the door?

TheHyphenated1: Since the judging period is already over, no. But I am definitely trying to push more updates out the door for other reasons -- namely that we're already at 49 updates, 660 replies and 4 real-life months and have only progressed 4 in-game months. If I don't keep the pace up, we'll never get to the end.

Comagoosie: Do you feel a certain competitiveness in the ACAs?

TheHyphenated1: Of course there is a certain competitiveness inherent in any award whatsoever. I am pleased to say, though, that the competitiveness I see in AARland is the most positive and harmless variety I've yet encountered on the Internet.

Comagoosie: How do you feel before/during/and after the ACAs?

TheHyphenated1: Before the ACAs, I don't think about them too much. During the ACAs, I try to check the thread every several days to see how things are going. After the ACAs -- where I was fortunate enough to win last time -- I've made special effort to thank my readers and all those that voted for Weltkriegschaft.

TheHyphenated1 is the designer and builder of [thread=345133] Weltkriegschaft [/thread]




EUROO7

Comagoosie: This your first ACA, what are your feelings?

EUROO7: Well, I feel very excited that my first AAR is somewhat popular and the fact that I might get an AwAARd!

Comagoosie: Do you think that the ACA is a good idea?

EUROO7: Certainly! It is a great way of showing new writers like myself that there is a wide following of our work.

Comagoosie: Since this is your first time writing, are you doing anything to put you ahead of those AARs that are already well established?

EUROO7: I try to post updates regularly. In the beginning, I posted up to two updates a day. This, I feel, ensures that the readers don't forget your AAR and keeps the fanbase actively commenting.

Comagoosie: True, but in turn do you think updating too much could be bad for your popularity? People are at work and have lives. They might not have as much time to catch up and feel discouraged at how far they have fallen behind.

EUROO7: Quite true. But then again, my updates are not very big, and it is easy to catch up.

Comagoosie: Yes they are and what a brilliant AAR you have written.

EUROO7 is the mastermind behind [thread=359478] The Papal State:A Mission AAR for EUIII (In Nomine)[/thread] and [thread=363039] Bavaria: A German Culture AAR (In Nomine)[/thread]


So now, you have heard from three differing views. Some are stark contrasts, but the overall consensus is that the ACAs are a positive experience that anyone who has read any AAR should participate in. I know there are many views on the ACAs and that is why I have set out to capture only but a few, so make your opinion for yourself, but there are some things that will remain fact.

There will be 123 awards given out this year at the pace we are at right now, so this doesn’t take into affect if Paradox releases Vicky 2 this year, or any other game (but we are hoping for Vicky). There will be hundreds perhaps thousands of recommendations. This in turn benefits all AARs no matter what AAR category they are in. So if you are in your right of mind you will wholeheartedly embrace in the ACAs and contribute because there is nothing out there that encourages positive competition and increases participation like the ACAs do.

Now that this ACA is done, I am already looking forwards to next quarter’s.

comagoosie is the author of For Rome's Honor
 
Last edited:

canonized

Heartbreaker
68 Badges
Oct 10, 2006
5.917
7
forum.paradoxplaza.com
  • Crusader Kings II: Horse Lords
  • Victoria: Revolutions
  • Rome Gold
  • Victoria 2
  • Victoria 2: A House Divided
  • Victoria 2: Heart of Darkness
  • 200k Club
  • 500k Club
  • Cities: Skylines
  • Europa Universalis IV: El Dorado
  • Europa Universalis IV: Pre-order
  • Crusader Kings II: Way of Life
  • Europa Universalis IV: Common Sense
  • Europa Universalis IV: Res Publica
  • Cities: Skylines - After Dark
  • Europa Universalis IV: Cossacks
  • Crusader Kings II: Conclave
  • Europa Universalis IV: Mare Nostrum
  • Stellaris
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Cadet
  • Crusader Kings II: Reapers Due
  • Europa Universalis IV: Rights of Man
  • Tyranny: Archon Edition
  • Stellaris: Leviathans Story Pack
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Together for Victory
  • Crusader Kings III
  • Europa Universalis III Complete
  • Hearts of Iron II: Armageddon
  • Crusader Kings II
  • Crusader Kings II: Charlemagne
  • Crusader Kings II: Legacy of Rome
  • Crusader Kings II: The Old Gods
  • Crusader Kings II: Rajas of India
  • Crusader Kings II: The Republic
  • Crusader Kings II: Sons of Abraham
  • Crusader Kings II: Sunset Invasion
  • Crusader Kings II: Sword of Islam
  • Europa Universalis III
  • Europa Universalis III: Chronicles
  • Divine Wind
  • Europa Universalis IV: Art of War
  • Europa Universalis IV: Conquest of Paradise
  • Europa Universalis IV: Wealth of Nations
  • Hearts of Iron III: Their Finest Hour
  • Hearts of Iron III Collection
  • Heir to the Throne
  • Europa Universalis III Complete
  • Leviathan: Warships
  • March of the Eagles
[anchor=I3]
[/anchor]

Good evening and welcome to You've Been Canonized, the weekly interview segment we usually host on Timelines but tonight, on the AARlander, we bring you EUROO7, author of The Papal State : A Mission AAR, join us in welcoming and getting to know the rising star of EU3 gamplay, I'm your host, canonized, and without further ado, lets begin!

Part I: The names OO7, EUROO7
Getting to know the man behind the mission

canonized - First of all , welcome to the programme and thank you very much for being on ! Could you introduce yourself for our audience please ?

EUROO7 -Sure thing. I am EUROO7, and I am an EU III addict. I have been on these forums since I got the game for Christmas last year and I like hats!

canonized - I'm sure a lot of people are curious as am I about some aspects of the person behind the name . As your name suggests you do have a bit of a secrecy streak ! Could you tell us something about the air of mystery you keep about you and to what purpose ?

EUROO7 -Well, I've always liked those spy shows from the twentieth century, and I actually wanted to be a spy when I was a kid. I just find mysteriousness so exciting!


canonized - So you're a relatively new face to AARlander ; how has your experience been so far ?

EUROO7 -Excellent! I love AARland and it's inhabitants. I find it is one of the most relaxed places in the Paradox Forums. The people are nice and always supportive .

canonized - At the time of this interview you're one of the front runners of for winning the Favourite New Writer category in the AARland Choice AwAARds ! How does it feel being part of this AARland activity ?

EUROO7 - I am very excited! With my "Mission AAR" being one of the favorites among the readers, it only encourages me to keep writing.

canonized - You've written in the gameplay format which is always a perennial favourite in AARland . Why that particular style ? And any inspirations for your work ?

EUROO7 - Gameplay because it's the easiest to do. Plus I love editing screenshots in funny ways. But as the "Mission AAR" progressed, I tried to introduce a new Narrative section into the AAR. It was received well, and I have continued in both styles.

canonized - As you progress and mature as an AARlander and writer , where do you think you see yourself a few months from now ?

EUROO7 - I think by the end of the year, I may be starting a purely Narrative AAR. That would be after I finish another AAR I have on hold. Bavaria: A German Culture AAR, which is supposed to be comedy! XD

Part II: Who doesn't love the Silent Rooms?
EUROO7 and Timelines
As usual this section is not published in the AARlander as per custom and courtesy . You can find the full text here

Part III: OO7's mission briefing !
We take a look at EUROO7's AARs

canonized - In the beginning you actually had people vote for which nation they'd like you to play ! Tell us a little bit about that time and how you AAR first began to take shape , please .

EUROO7 - Well, I had originally planned to do an Austrian AAR. Then I found out In Nomine was going to be released, and I didn't want to have to start over, so I waited. When it came out, I found the new Mission System very interesting. From there I got the idea to start an AAR based on that whole system. So I started my game as Austria. It went terrible! I was crushed by Bohemian troops within two years. From there, I decided to just let the AARlanders decide what country I would play. They chose The Papal State, and here we are today!

canonized - And how do you feel about this unique state to play and tell us a little bit about your challenges and triumphs in writing about the states of the Church ?

EUROO7 - Well, there's just something about the Papal State that everyone likes. I guess it's the power it represents as the leader of Christianity. But one of my favorite experiences writing and playing as the Papal State, was a mission which I had. It was to bring Italy back to the Catholic faith. This mission is special because it took me one hundred and fifty years to complete!

canonized - Indeed ! Let's talk about the Mission system you've adopted . Tell us a little bit about this way of 'formalizing' , if you will , your gameplay stance . How did you come to take on this role and how has it been going so far ?

EUROO7 - Since this is my first AAR, it's always hard to choose an objective for the whole game. The Mission System provides everchanging objectives that are always random. That is until the original missions ended. When missions became dull, like building manufacturies and building up troops, I decided to let the readers submit custom missions which I've been doing from seventeen hundred onwards.

canonized - You've definitely kept up the reader participation and it's made your AAR one of the most popular in the EU3 section ! Do you think IN has made a huge impact on the way you can execute this AAR specifically ?

EUROO7 - Yes. A tremendous impact. Firstly, the Mission AAR wouldn't be about missions, since they were introduced in In Nomine. Second, everyone like to read gameplay AARs for tips on how to play. Since most readers are up to date with the expansions and patches, they look for In Nomine AARs.

canonized - You did mention that you also enjoyed tinkering with screenshots and sometimes they're quite hilarious such as painting little boats on top of sea provinces ! Talk to us a little bit about your use of screenshots and how they've factored into your AAR ?

EUROO7 - Ah yes, the art of editing screenshots. Well, I have an uncanny tendency to notice thing most people don't. For example: Hats. Have you ever noticed how hats impact the game? The better you are, the taller your hat is. Then there's the random boat or comment that must be included to show readers what you're doing. I find those details let the readers have a look into the inner machinations of the writer's mind.

canonized - Haha , well lastly from this section , you already mentioned that you're planning a narrative AAR after you're finished ; can you give us any sneak previews on what it might be like ?

EUROO7 - Well, I'm thinking of something to do with the life of a mad king. He'll be your average early modern era monarch, with a double personality that will blow your mind away with his actions!

canonized - And that about wraps it up ! Thank you very much for being on the show EUROO7 , and thank you to all those who joined us today and tuned in ! If you would like to see more interviews , join us in Timelines for our regular weekly interview segment . Thank you once again , and goodnight !

canonized is the author of Timelines: What if Spain Failed to Control the World?
 
Last edited:

canonized

Heartbreaker
68 Badges
Oct 10, 2006
5.917
7
forum.paradoxplaza.com
  • Crusader Kings II: Horse Lords
  • Victoria: Revolutions
  • Rome Gold
  • Victoria 2
  • Victoria 2: A House Divided
  • Victoria 2: Heart of Darkness
  • 200k Club
  • 500k Club
  • Cities: Skylines
  • Europa Universalis IV: El Dorado
  • Europa Universalis IV: Pre-order
  • Crusader Kings II: Way of Life
  • Europa Universalis IV: Common Sense
  • Europa Universalis IV: Res Publica
  • Cities: Skylines - After Dark
  • Europa Universalis IV: Cossacks
  • Crusader Kings II: Conclave
  • Europa Universalis IV: Mare Nostrum
  • Stellaris
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Cadet
  • Crusader Kings II: Reapers Due
  • Europa Universalis IV: Rights of Man
  • Tyranny: Archon Edition
  • Stellaris: Leviathans Story Pack
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Together for Victory
  • Crusader Kings III
  • Europa Universalis III Complete
  • Hearts of Iron II: Armageddon
  • Crusader Kings II
  • Crusader Kings II: Charlemagne
  • Crusader Kings II: Legacy of Rome
  • Crusader Kings II: The Old Gods
  • Crusader Kings II: Rajas of India
  • Crusader Kings II: The Republic
  • Crusader Kings II: Sons of Abraham
  • Crusader Kings II: Sunset Invasion
  • Crusader Kings II: Sword of Islam
  • Europa Universalis III
  • Europa Universalis III: Chronicles
  • Divine Wind
  • Europa Universalis IV: Art of War
  • Europa Universalis IV: Conquest of Paradise
  • Europa Universalis IV: Wealth of Nations
  • Hearts of Iron III: Their Finest Hour
  • Hearts of Iron III Collection
  • Heir to the Throne
  • Europa Universalis III Complete
  • Leviathan: Warships
  • March of the Eagles
[anchor=I4]Month of Augustus[/anchor]
By DarthJF

As this AARlander comes out in August I’m here to tell a little about how it got it’s name. No doubt anyone that didn’t sleep during history classes in school (but there aren’t any on paradox forums, are there?) knows that August was named in honour of Augustus, the first and perhaps greatest Emperor of Rome. So what I shall do is tell a bit about Augustus rise to power and why the former Sextilis was named after him.

Emperor Augustus was born as Gaius Octavius Thurinus, but he changed his name a number of times. Later he became known as Gaius Julius Caesar Octavianus, when murdered Dictator Gaius Julius Caesar proclaimed in his will Octavius as his adopted son and heir. Later the Roman Senate gave him the title of Augustus with which he would be best known.

Gaius Octavius was born in September 23th 63 BC, and after the assassination of Julius Caesar during the Ides of March in 44 BC, and the contents of his testament came known the only 19 year old Octavius, now the new Julius Caesar was suddenly plunged into the heart of Roman politics. Being in Illyria when the news of Caesar’s murder arrived he began to rally Caesar’s veteran troops around him and began to march on Italy. In Rome he met Mark Antony and the senate led by Marcus Tullius Cicero.

Facing conflict with Mark Antony over the leadership of Julius Caesar's supporters, Octavian allied himself with the senate and waged war against Antony in Gaul together with senates forces. In April 43 BC Mark Antony’s forces were defeated and the man was forced to retreat behind the Alps. Also both consuls that were leading consular armies were killed in battle. With both consulships vacant Octavian marched in Rome with his troops and was elected consul in 19th of August at the same year.

Later that year Octavian formed the second triumvirate together with Mark Antony and Marcus Aemilius Lepidus, who had aligned himself with Antony. Together the three began bloody proscriptions and purged their political opponents, and seized their properties. In January 42 BC murdered Julius Caesar was proclaimed as a god. Taking advantage of this Octavian could now call himself the “Son of God”. Later that year the Triumvirs faced in Macedon forces led by two prominent assassins of Julius Caesar, Marcus Junius Brutus and Gaius Cassius Longinus. With both men killing themselves after defeat republican forces were effectively destroyed.

After the battle Triumvirs split the empire between themselves. Octavian would get control over Spain, Gaul and Italy, while Mark Antony would get eastern territories, leaving Lepidus with Africa. With the control if Italy Octavian was left with the unthankful task of resettling the soldiers from the Macedonian campaign. Having to choose between the favour of soldiers or Roman citizens Octavian chose the soldiers and confiscated large amounts of land to give troops to settle. Octavian also faced rebellion led by Mark Antony's step-daughter Clodia Pulchra and Mark Antony's younger brother Lucius Antonius. Octavian besieged the two and their troops in Perusia and forced them to surrender. Both Lucius and Clodia were spared thanks to their connection with Mark Antony, but Octavian didn’t show such kindness to those that supported them. On March 15, during the anniversary of Julius Caesar's assassination, he had 300 Roman senators and knights executed. Some sources claim that the execution was being made as a human sacrifice to Julius Caesar, though there is no definite proof for that.

Of the Roman territory Sicily was still not in Triumvir's hands, but controlled by Sextus Pompeius, the youngest son of Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus, who used piracy to harass grain shipments that were coming to Italy, threatening Octavian's position. Octavian attacked Pompeius in September 36 BC together with Lepidus and defeated him. After the battle Lepidus tried to add Sicily to his own territories, but Octavian succeeded in persuading Lepidus’s war exhausted troops, that wished to avoid another civil war, to defect over to him. Left with no troops Lepidus was under the mercy of Octavian, who uncharacteristically spared his life and sent Lepidus on a comfortable exile, even allowing Lepidus to keep the office of Pontifex Maximus, that he held. Sicily and Africa were now added on Octavians territories. While Octavian celebrated his victory over Sextus Pompeius, Antony had suffered a defeat against Parthians, tarnishing his military reputation.

With two ambitious and power hungry men controlling the halves of the Mediterranean it was only a matter of time before Octavian and Antony would go to war against each other. Despite being married to Octavians sister Octavia, Mark Antony engaged in love affair with Cleopatra, the queen of Egypt, and ended up sending Octavia away to Rome. This proved valuable propaganda tool for Octavian, who could claim that Antony had become Egyptian and enchanted by Cleopatra. By storming the temple of Vestal Virgins Octavian got his hands on Mark Antony's will. In there he split Roman territories for his sons by Cleopatra to be ruled as kingdoms, as well proclaimed himself and Cleopatra as gods. This proved finally to be enough and with the Senate by his side Octavian went to war with Antony and Cleopatra in late 32 BC.

During the next year Octavians navy led by Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa defeated the navy of Antony and Cleopatra in battle the of Actium. During the following year they were defeated in another battle on the coast of Alexandria and on August 1st, Antony and Cleopatra killed themselves. Cleopatra left behind her son by Julius Caesar, Caesarion who had been proclaimed an heir to Caesar, whom Octavian ordered killed. Cleopatra's other children were spared of the fate, and were given to Octavian's sister Octavia to be cared.

With Mark Antony dead Octavian was now the sole ruler of the Republic. In January of 27 BC the Senate gave Octavian the title of Augustus and Princeps, moment that historians generally see as the beginning of Roman Emperorship. With his first consulship and the deaths of Mark Antony and Cleopatra with the fall Alexandria, among other things occurring in the month of Sextilis, the Senate honoured Augustus by naming the month after him.

"Whereas the Emperor Augustus Caesar, in the month of Sextilis, was first admitted to the consulate, and thrice entered the city in triumph, and in the same month the legions, from the Janiculum, placed themselves under his auspices, and in the same month Egypt was brought under the authority of the Roman people, and in the same month an end was put to the civil wars; and whereas for these reasons the said month is, and has been, most fortunate to this empire, it is hereby decreed by the senate that the said month shall be called Augustus."

DarthJF is the author of
Revival of Roman Empire: Byzantium IN AAR
 

canonized

Heartbreaker
68 Badges
Oct 10, 2006
5.917
7
forum.paradoxplaza.com
  • Crusader Kings II: Horse Lords
  • Victoria: Revolutions
  • Rome Gold
  • Victoria 2
  • Victoria 2: A House Divided
  • Victoria 2: Heart of Darkness
  • 200k Club
  • 500k Club
  • Cities: Skylines
  • Europa Universalis IV: El Dorado
  • Europa Universalis IV: Pre-order
  • Crusader Kings II: Way of Life
  • Europa Universalis IV: Common Sense
  • Europa Universalis IV: Res Publica
  • Cities: Skylines - After Dark
  • Europa Universalis IV: Cossacks
  • Crusader Kings II: Conclave
  • Europa Universalis IV: Mare Nostrum
  • Stellaris
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Cadet
  • Crusader Kings II: Reapers Due
  • Europa Universalis IV: Rights of Man
  • Tyranny: Archon Edition
  • Stellaris: Leviathans Story Pack
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Together for Victory
  • Crusader Kings III
  • Europa Universalis III Complete
  • Hearts of Iron II: Armageddon
  • Crusader Kings II
  • Crusader Kings II: Charlemagne
  • Crusader Kings II: Legacy of Rome
  • Crusader Kings II: The Old Gods
  • Crusader Kings II: Rajas of India
  • Crusader Kings II: The Republic
  • Crusader Kings II: Sons of Abraham
  • Crusader Kings II: Sunset Invasion
  • Crusader Kings II: Sword of Islam
  • Europa Universalis III
  • Europa Universalis III: Chronicles
  • Divine Wind
  • Europa Universalis IV: Art of War
  • Europa Universalis IV: Conquest of Paradise
  • Europa Universalis IV: Wealth of Nations
  • Hearts of Iron III: Their Finest Hour
  • Hearts of Iron III Collection
  • Heir to the Throne
  • Europa Universalis III Complete
  • Leviathan: Warships
  • March of the Eagles
[anchor=I5]The Wilting of the White Rose: The Battle of Bosworth Field[/anchor]
By Eber


With the death of Edward IV in 1483, England was destined for upheaval as the late king left the crown to his twelve year old son. Richard, Duke of Gloucester was named Protector of the Realm until the son reached an appropriate age to be crowned King of England.

In London however, things began to unravel with the announcement of Robert Stillington, Bishop of Bath and Wells of the existence of a pre-contract between Edward IV and a woman named Eleanor Butler. The contract stated that Edward’s later marriage was invalid, effectively dismissing his son’s right to the throne. With no legal heir, Parliament officially declared Richard as King of England. Richard III, King of England’s reign would be short-lived. In 1485, the earl of Richmond, a Welshman named Henry Tudor crossed the English Channel with 2,000 French and Scottish mercenaries. Henry’s right to the throne was obscure, yet legitimate, for he was a distant cousin of the deceased Henry VI. Many Lancastrians and disgruntled Yorkists would join Henry’s banner to rid England of Richard III. On August 7th, Henry Tudor landed in Pembrokeshire and slowly began to march into England’s interior, hoping to gain the support of Welshmen and others who disliked the King.

During Henry’s planned invasion, Richard III was suspicious of the loyalty of some of his commanders including the prominent Lord Stanley who was related to Henry Tudor by marriage. Lord Stanley requested leave from the king in able to return to his castle. Due to his suspicion, he granted the leave but insisted on Lord Stanley leaving his son in his hands to assure Stanley’s continued loyalty to the crown. By the time Henry had landed at Pembrokeshire, Richard had sent word to his vassals to raise their forces and meet him at Leicester. Lord Stanley did not muster his men, nor did he join forces with Henry Tudor which was Richard’s concern. Many of Richard’s vassals also were not quick to respond to the order. However, Richard was not the only one having trouble raising men for his army. Henry Tudor was aggravated with the lack of recruits induced by his premature belief that many would join his banner to topple the King. Before the battle that would ultimately determine the victor, neither man was satisfied with the size of their army. It would be Lord Stanley’s actions, proving Richard’s suspicion correct that would quickly decide the outcome of the war.

The armies of Henry and Richard would meet on August 22, 1485 at Market Bosworth. It is difficult to estimate exactly how many soldiers each man had under his command, but the popular assessment is that Richard III had nearly 8,000 men while Henry Tudor had about 5,000 men. Lord Stanley’s force consisted of about 3,000 men that could quickly turn the battle to either man’s favor. While Richard and Henry began to set up their positions for the upcoming battle, Lord Stanley kept his forces at bay and waited for the opportune moment.

Richard III reached Ambion Hill, capturing the high ground and divided his army into three divisions. As Richard was positioning his army, Lord Stanley had stopped his men to the south of the battlefield, far enough away to keep both Richard and Henry guessing to whom his loyalty would be given. Problems arose in Richard’s battle formation when the Earl of Northumberland refused to line up as ordered as he held his force back from the front line. Again, the loyalty of Richard’s commanders was in question. Meanwhile, Henry Tudor was also having difficulty in forming his men for battle. He stopped before Ambion Hill, but it took his men an incredibly long time to line up, possibly due to the muddy ground or other unknown reasons. By the time the battle began, much of the morning had been spent.

Henry’s forces began to reign down fire upon Richard’s forces with archery and cannons; in hope to force Richard’s men down from the hill. Henry was successful in his ploy as he sent much of his force, led by the experienced soldier, Earl of Oxford against Richard’s vanguard under the command of the Duke of Norfolk. Seeing that his men were being pushed back by Oxford’s forces, Richard reinforced the center of Norfolk’s men which eventually turned the tide as Oxford began to give ground. During the intense fighting, Lord Stanley and Northumberland remained neutral, refusing to draw their forces into the battle. As Henry’s forces were outnumbered by Richard, he knew that Lord Stanley’s forces were needed to gain a victory. Seeking an intervention, Henry rode with his personal bodyguard toward Stanley to entice him to help Henry’s beleaguered force. Richard saw Henry riding across the battlefield and instantly decided to charge down the hill to attack his small force and kill him; thus ending the entire rebel frustration. At some point in the charge, Richard received terrible news that his commander Norfolk had been killed by the rebels. Some of his advisors encouraged Richard to retreat, but the King knew if his charge was successful; there would not be a need for another battle. In the beginning, the charge was looking to be a great success as Henry’s small force was overwhelmed by Richard, even Henry’s standard bearer, Sir William Brandon was killed. When Henry nearly had lost all hope; Lord Stanley finally acted. Seeing Henry in a grave situation, Stanley ordered his men to attack Richard’s cavalry. Very soon, Richard’s forces were encircled and trapped by Henry’s remaining men and Stanley’s fresh troops. Cries of treason was heard through the pitch battle as Richard’s men were killed trying to protect their King. Richard’s own standard bearer, Sir Percival Thirwall was cut down before the King finally succumbed to Henry and Stanley’s forces. With the death of Richard, the battle soon ended.

Richard III was the last English King to die in battle. With his death, the line of Plantagenet kings died with him. His mutilated body was paraded around the streets of Leicester before being buried at the local church. Henry Tudor was crowned King of England, and his ordination marked the beginning of the Tudor dynasty of English monarchs that would last for over a century. The Battle of Bosworth would not officially end the War of the Roses, for the last battle against a pretender occurred two years later at the Battle of Stoke. Lord Stanley would receive much with the crowning of Henry as his family’s power and wealth increased dramatically. The Earl of Northumberland was captured at Bosworth but was soon released and forgiven for all crimes against the new King. His titles and lands were reinstated, proving that his calculated tactic in keeping his forces from the battle worked in his favor. Throughout the War of the Roses, Richard had fought many pretenders in protecting his crown. However, it would be a Welshman named Henry Tudor that would become Richard’s greatest threat and eventually end his reign and consequently his life as well.

Eber is the author of Scotland: A Far Cry from Bannockburn
 

canonized

Heartbreaker
68 Badges
Oct 10, 2006
5.917
7
forum.paradoxplaza.com
  • Crusader Kings II: Horse Lords
  • Victoria: Revolutions
  • Rome Gold
  • Victoria 2
  • Victoria 2: A House Divided
  • Victoria 2: Heart of Darkness
  • 200k Club
  • 500k Club
  • Cities: Skylines
  • Europa Universalis IV: El Dorado
  • Europa Universalis IV: Pre-order
  • Crusader Kings II: Way of Life
  • Europa Universalis IV: Common Sense
  • Europa Universalis IV: Res Publica
  • Cities: Skylines - After Dark
  • Europa Universalis IV: Cossacks
  • Crusader Kings II: Conclave
  • Europa Universalis IV: Mare Nostrum
  • Stellaris
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Cadet
  • Crusader Kings II: Reapers Due
  • Europa Universalis IV: Rights of Man
  • Tyranny: Archon Edition
  • Stellaris: Leviathans Story Pack
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Together for Victory
  • Crusader Kings III
  • Europa Universalis III Complete
  • Hearts of Iron II: Armageddon
  • Crusader Kings II
  • Crusader Kings II: Charlemagne
  • Crusader Kings II: Legacy of Rome
  • Crusader Kings II: The Old Gods
  • Crusader Kings II: Rajas of India
  • Crusader Kings II: The Republic
  • Crusader Kings II: Sons of Abraham
  • Crusader Kings II: Sunset Invasion
  • Crusader Kings II: Sword of Islam
  • Europa Universalis III
  • Europa Universalis III: Chronicles
  • Divine Wind
  • Europa Universalis IV: Art of War
  • Europa Universalis IV: Conquest of Paradise
  • Europa Universalis IV: Wealth of Nations
  • Hearts of Iron III: Their Finest Hour
  • Hearts of Iron III Collection
  • Heir to the Throne
  • Europa Universalis III Complete
  • Leviathan: Warships
  • March of the Eagles
[anchor=I6]Music and Inspiration[/anchor]
By Snugglie

It is commonly agreed upon that without the proper skill, a writer is unlikely to produce anything that will make him relevant in the literature-classes of future generations of high school students. However, likewise, no writer – no matter how skilled – is likely to produce anything worthwhile without one, or preferably both, of two factors: inspiration and motivation. Would a Stephen King without the will to write, or a Robert Jordan without any idea of what to write about, ever be able to create anything that you, a reader of this very article, would enjoy?

I am infinitely far away from having teenagers being forced to analyse my works in school, and if anything I’ve written ever reaches that status I will eat my hat (assuming I am not already dead). My intention with this article is, however, to show how I, a happy amateur, find my inspiration and what I do to develop it. More specifically, I will speak about why music, above everything else, inspires me to create.

You have all watched the telly at some point in your life – if not you are probably part of a nomadic tribe residing in central Asia, in which case you probably do not have a computer anyway and thus is merely my imagination working – and thus you have all noticed how often music is used in both TV-shows and movies. The murdered in Psycho approaches the shower to the sound of intense music; V in V For Vendetta blows up the Old Bailey in London to the sound of Tchaikovsky’s 1812 Overture; the chimes of freedom toll as Andy Dufresne manages to escape prison in The Shawshank Redemption. The music is there for a reason: to invoke – or provoke – feelings, thoughts and reactions, adding flavour to our experience when watching it. Because that is what music does to us; it makes us feel, think and react. And is that not ideal, when trying to start writing?

Mostly, I only ever find real inspiration when alone. Solitary walks are wonderful for this purpose, especially with the odd darkness and rain. Walking alone across one of the all too many fields that surround my little town is as special a happening no matter if I’ve got the banshee wail of a Shane MacGowan with teeth in The Pogues’ If I Should Fall From Grace With God or the contemplative, death-wishing lyrics of Bruce Springsteen in the slow ballad Youngstown.

Of course, various sorts of music fit the best for various events and venues. For the already mentioned lonesome walks, something slowly paced with focus on the lyrics, not the music, is ideal. Either with singer-songwriters such as Jason Mraz and Amy Macdonald, or with bands that have a very skilled songwriter in stock, such as the above mentioned The Pogues, Sonata Arctica (although their songs does tend to focus rather much on the music and melody itself, and is thus not completely representative of what I am talking about), Lars Winnerbäck or Dire Straits. There are of course many more, but me making a very long list hardly makes any sense – canonized’s got me here to write, not to list.

Living in a town however, you will logically walk among other carbon-based life forms on two legs sooner or later, and there is little or no reason to not try and gather ideas and feelings then as well. However, since there are people around you, you will have to pay attention to them and their doings, their cars, etc. Thus, lyrics are not ideal; lyrics require some attention to be interpreted, and if you attend a little too much to interpreting lyrics when walking out in the traffic, you might get hit by a minivan full of stressed tourists on their way to the beach. Therefore music without any lyrics proves very worthwhile, preferable the more fast-paced the more people you have around you. Provides for a very filmic feeling.

Of course, there are also the rare pieces that stand on their own, where all components work in symbiosis with a common goal, tracks that would be inspiring when sitting in an empty room with colourless walls. You know what I am talking about, the songs from which you draw strength in harsh times, from which you gain extra confidence and happiness; the songs that, when listened to a few years later, can make you recollect a period of a big part of your life. This either comes from quality or simply by having listened to the track a whole lot. Regardless, it will still be one of those rare, unique pieces.

This, we can utilise to our advantage, when writing. The feeling of immense sorrow you felt after being dumped by your girlfriend in the 80’s will be conveyed again if you listen to the same song as you did then (most likely Foreigner’s I Wanna Know What Love Is, the anthem of broken hearts, or The Who’s generally gloomy Behind Blue Eyes) – this you can utilise when portraying how the young knight leaves his bride-to-be for the war. The feeling of exaltation and expectation you felt when running down the stairs of your school after graduating from high school will be returned to you by listening to the same song you and your mates did that evening (maybe Springsteen’s No Surrender, or Alice Cooper’s I’m Eighteen?) – this you can use when portraying the same young knight’s high expectations for his upcoming campaign. I could continue to line up examples, but I believe I have made my point. Utilise these things if you can – what you feel when writing is likely to affect the tone in your writing.

No, I am not known for writing comprehensive articles, so it is now time to summarise what I’ve actually said. If I’ve succeeded with conveying my message, you now know that music plays a very large part in my writing – you will also have noticed my subtle hints at you, the reader, to try it out yourself if you have not done so already. To make out for my incomprehensibility – of course, it might just be imagined – have a few samples of what I listen to in the process of creation, as well as the songs listed in the article. Hope it’ll give you ideas as well. So ‘til next time; listen and enjoy.

Dropkick Murphys – Loyal To No-One Youtube
Sonata Arctica – White Pearl, Black Oceans… Youtube
The Killers – Sam’s Town (Abbey Road Version) Youtube
Bruce Springsteen – Youngstown Youtube
The Pogues – If I Should Fall From Grace With God Youtube
Foreigner – I Wanna Know What Love Is Youtube
Alice Cooper – I’m Eighteen Youtube
Bruce Springsteen – No Surrender Youtube

snugglie is the author of Lotharingia - A tale of resurrection
 
Last edited:

canonized

Heartbreaker
68 Badges
Oct 10, 2006
5.917
7
forum.paradoxplaza.com
  • Crusader Kings II: Horse Lords
  • Victoria: Revolutions
  • Rome Gold
  • Victoria 2
  • Victoria 2: A House Divided
  • Victoria 2: Heart of Darkness
  • 200k Club
  • 500k Club
  • Cities: Skylines
  • Europa Universalis IV: El Dorado
  • Europa Universalis IV: Pre-order
  • Crusader Kings II: Way of Life
  • Europa Universalis IV: Common Sense
  • Europa Universalis IV: Res Publica
  • Cities: Skylines - After Dark
  • Europa Universalis IV: Cossacks
  • Crusader Kings II: Conclave
  • Europa Universalis IV: Mare Nostrum
  • Stellaris
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Cadet
  • Crusader Kings II: Reapers Due
  • Europa Universalis IV: Rights of Man
  • Tyranny: Archon Edition
  • Stellaris: Leviathans Story Pack
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Together for Victory
  • Crusader Kings III
  • Europa Universalis III Complete
  • Hearts of Iron II: Armageddon
  • Crusader Kings II
  • Crusader Kings II: Charlemagne
  • Crusader Kings II: Legacy of Rome
  • Crusader Kings II: The Old Gods
  • Crusader Kings II: Rajas of India
  • Crusader Kings II: The Republic
  • Crusader Kings II: Sons of Abraham
  • Crusader Kings II: Sunset Invasion
  • Crusader Kings II: Sword of Islam
  • Europa Universalis III
  • Europa Universalis III: Chronicles
  • Divine Wind
  • Europa Universalis IV: Art of War
  • Europa Universalis IV: Conquest of Paradise
  • Europa Universalis IV: Wealth of Nations
  • Hearts of Iron III: Their Finest Hour
  • Hearts of Iron III Collection
  • Heir to the Throne
  • Europa Universalis III Complete
  • Leviathan: Warships
  • March of the Eagles
[anchor=I7]The Spirit of the Rules[/anchor]
By thehyphenated1

As most of you are aware (and all of you should be), AARland is a kingdom of laws -- laws which encapsulate the community's standards of what is acceptable subject matter for writers to explore.

The fundamental issue that many writers have to grapple with is: "How do I balance adherence to forum guidelines with fidelity to the story I want to tell?"

There is no easy answer, but hopefully my thoughts on this process will get you thinking. This article will primarily treat this subject with respect to the HoI AAR forums (which have a more stringent policy), but the principles herein are applicable throughout AARland.

The HoI AAR Forum rules strictly prohibit: gulags, death camps, POW camps, the Holocaust, systematic ethnic purges, terror bombing, chemical weapons, swastikas and Nazi symbols, propaganda or songs.

In practice, though, even seemingly clear-cut rules such as these can potentially lend themselves to an almost endless amount of "rules-lawyering".

Sure, the forum rules prohibit POW camps, but since the Bataan Death March was technically only on the way to the camps you should feel free to write about it, right? Wrong. For that would go against the larger, unwritten spirit of forum policy.

The spirit of that policy comes down to sensitivity. While all the other Paradox titles cover time periods far removed from our own, the era depicted in the Hearts of Iron games is well-remembered by millions of living people.

While discussions about even the worst atrocities committed by the Timurids will be almost purely academic, almost anything from the 20th Century, if handled in an insensitive fashion, has the potential to be highly controversial.

My own AAR, Weltkriegschaft, centers on the most controversial nation in the most controversial game on the Forums -- Nazi Germany. More than most writers, I've had to carefully consider the best ways to balance adherence and fidelity. Not too long ago, I ran up again an issue concerning the prohibition on terror bombing. Did the rule prohibit "actual" terror bombing, or also prohibit a propaganda newspaper from making groundless allegations of it?

I discussed the matter at length with one of the Mods (stnylan, to whom I should give a little shout-out for his professional and courteous handling of the affair) trying to arrive at exactly where the "line" was drawn. As I learned*, it was usually acceptable to describe false propaganda reports on the condition that readers know at the time of reading them that they are indeed false.

From this experience and conversations with a few other writers, it seems that if an author is committed to treating a subject with sensitivity (the spirit of the law), the Mods will be more than happy to work with them to find ways to remain within the Forum Rules (the letter of the law).

An important point that is considered is the authorial point of view. There is more leeway in what is acceptable when something is presented as a horror of war than if something is glorified. In fact, glorification of some otherwise acceptable topics can take them over the line into insensitivity. A thoughtful and mature depiction of the aftermath of a nuclear attack could elevate the tone of your AAR and stimulate your readers to consider serious and meaningful issues. If you get ghoulish though, and readers can tell that you're reveling in human suffering, your writing ceases to be thought-provoking and becomes distasteful.

Authorial point of view dovetails into the stylistic tone of an AAR, which also bears heavily on questions of sensitivity. If the community can see that a topic has being treated seriously, they will allow a writer to explore it much more readily than one who plays it for laughs or shock value. This is not to say that you're free to write about the goings-on at a death camp as long as you play it straight -- the rules are very clear on that. But when it comes to the gray areas and the spirit of the policy, I think my assertion holds very true. An appropriate example might be the depiction of combat and injury. If a narrative AAR slowly builds to the dramatic and painful death of a major character this will be received much better than a similar piece that leads off its first post with an equivalent amount of gore. In a sense, then, it's fair to say that you have to earn AARland's trust before venturing into sensitive territory.

"But," you may be saying, "how can I characterize my central villain if I can't show him getting really nasty?" There are ways, dear reader!

Though there are certainly malevolent characters in Weltkriegschaft -- Dr. Baltazar, Reichsminister Goebbels and Adolf Hitler himself, for example -- I don't demonstrate this by having them slit someone open in plain sight. Instead, when my malevolent characters have to do something nasty enough that it might slip into the gray area of sensitivity, I try to find ways to imply the action without having to actually depict it.

Never underestimate the power of the imagination. In my experience, when readers are left to envision "off-camera" scenes for themselves, the picture them more compellingly than would be possible from written narration. Let's say you're trying to convey to readers just how evil a particular Gestapo agent is. Rather than showing him torturing resistance fighters "on camera", you have a number of ways to send a message that can potentially be even more chilling.

<> Set the stage for something disturbing that is implied to occur after the end of the update. Maybe the Gestapo agent taunts his captives or tries to toy with them psychologically. If the last sentence of the update shows readers the agent reaching for his tray of torture implements, they will know all too well what is about to happen, and their imaginations will fill in the rest.

<> Depict the aftermath of the nastiness. Did Wehrmacht soldiers just level a Ukrainian village? Rather than show us the slaughter of hundreds of innocent civilians and potentially veer off into unacceptable territory, write about the aftermath. Maybe Red Army soldiers happen upon a group of shivering and terrified survivors, or enter a deserted house to find the soup still warm.

<> Shift anything particularly graphic "off camera". While cues like gunshots from within a building, screams from the bottom of a dungeon or bloody footprints in the snow certainly send readers' minds racing, they have far less potential to offend than a depiction of the actions themselves. These techniques have the added bonus of leaving an element of ambiguity that will make your readers question and reconsider their interpretations of what they just read.

The Bottom Line?

Many potentially controversial topics are also some of the most rewarding to write about. In doing so, you must be cautious and mindful of the forum rules. Use your creativity as a writer to convey your message without becoming insensitive. Show the Mods the respect of asking about something that falls into a gray area before you go ahead with it, and in return I'm sure they will work with you to the greatest extent possible. Above all, as Lord Durham implores us -- use common sense!



*This was advice given specifically as regarded an individual case. Please refer any question you have to a moderator for an answer fully applicable to your own AAR.

TheHyphenated1 is the author of Weltkriegschaft
 

canonized

Heartbreaker
68 Badges
Oct 10, 2006
5.917
7
forum.paradoxplaza.com
  • Crusader Kings II: Horse Lords
  • Victoria: Revolutions
  • Rome Gold
  • Victoria 2
  • Victoria 2: A House Divided
  • Victoria 2: Heart of Darkness
  • 200k Club
  • 500k Club
  • Cities: Skylines
  • Europa Universalis IV: El Dorado
  • Europa Universalis IV: Pre-order
  • Crusader Kings II: Way of Life
  • Europa Universalis IV: Common Sense
  • Europa Universalis IV: Res Publica
  • Cities: Skylines - After Dark
  • Europa Universalis IV: Cossacks
  • Crusader Kings II: Conclave
  • Europa Universalis IV: Mare Nostrum
  • Stellaris
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Cadet
  • Crusader Kings II: Reapers Due
  • Europa Universalis IV: Rights of Man
  • Tyranny: Archon Edition
  • Stellaris: Leviathans Story Pack
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Together for Victory
  • Crusader Kings III
  • Europa Universalis III Complete
  • Hearts of Iron II: Armageddon
  • Crusader Kings II
  • Crusader Kings II: Charlemagne
  • Crusader Kings II: Legacy of Rome
  • Crusader Kings II: The Old Gods
  • Crusader Kings II: Rajas of India
  • Crusader Kings II: The Republic
  • Crusader Kings II: Sons of Abraham
  • Crusader Kings II: Sunset Invasion
  • Crusader Kings II: Sword of Islam
  • Europa Universalis III
  • Europa Universalis III: Chronicles
  • Divine Wind
  • Europa Universalis IV: Art of War
  • Europa Universalis IV: Conquest of Paradise
  • Europa Universalis IV: Wealth of Nations
  • Hearts of Iron III: Their Finest Hour
  • Hearts of Iron III Collection
  • Heir to the Throne
  • Europa Universalis III Complete
  • Leviathan: Warships
  • March of the Eagles
[anchor=I8]The Guess the Author thread[/anchor]
By robou

For those of you who don’t know or can’t guess what ‘Guess the Author’ (sometimes just referred to as GtA in this article) is, I will offer some insight. GtA, and no that is not Grand Theft Auto, is a scheme whereby an organiser, Amric at the moment, calls for four writers to write a story based on a broad topical suggestion. The organiser then posts these four pieces and the readers have to give a suggestion or guess, using evidence that they present, as to who wrote what piece, hence the name ‘Guess the Author’.

Right, now that that is sorted, I can tell you that GtA has been experiencing some hard times lately over the past few month trying to get readers and writers. During this article I will be presenting evidence supported by interviews I had with Redwolf, the organiser of GtA while Amric was unwell, and Amric who has now returned to administer the scheme.

So lets us question, firstly, why GtA might not be doing so well. When I was first asked to write this, I went around looking and guessing as to what I thought the cause of this might be. At first it seemed that, due to the obvious length and time that needs to be spent writing both the entries and the guesses, people were just not willing to spend time doing the scheme. After further research, it has become apparent that this is only a small flaw in the scheme. Amric en-lightened me with why he felt he wasn’t getting the comments he should.

Robou: It seems that over the past few months, GTA has been suffering from a lack of commenters, and in some cases writers as well. What would you put this down to?

Amric: it is the summer season. During the summer a lot of things slow down on the forums. It’s an annual event that those of us who have been here awhile have noticed, commented upon, tried to change and realized we couldn’t. Why? Because during the summer many people take vacation. The forums tend to slow down during this period of time. It’s just a fact of life.
Ok, so it is summer. But is everyone on vacation all the time? Surely in the four months of summer, you can pop into the forums for a few hours to read and reply to GtA? Being British, I know best that in my country summer always heralds some days too got hot to go out and plenty violent summer storms/flooding and the like. I can respect a little slowing down in things, but lads lets not let the summer destroy schemes like this. Amric continues…

Amric: Now the second reason is that the GtA has been on hiatus for a few months. Over it’s lifespan this initiative has had various champions, two of which are Coz1 and Hajji Giray I. Hajji is a young fellow and his family tends to take a bunch of mini vacations during the summer. He’s also a student. His life is very busy. Coz has been very busy lately as well. Until I had a bit of a health problem I stepped up to the plate to guide this venerable institution. I had the honor of Redwolf coming in to save the first month of my tenure, which I really appreciate. I am aware getting people involved again will take some time. But I am willing to give it a shot.
Now this is a good point. But I don’t believe that simply having a different person at the helm of a ship should make much difference. The rules were laid down so that they are hard to change, mainly because they were so good. Don’t be put off by the fact that the baton of honour is being passed around various different people, they all run it the same way and for the same cause!

So what about you commenters and writers yourselves. After all, you are the people that make it. What makes you scared and go running to your mothers about GtA? What does this harmless beast invoke fear into from? Redwolf has a few suggestions that you needn’t worry crying about.

Redwolf: A few factors which I think might be reasons for the lack of comments from other writers might be:
i) Lack of time. It takes a fair bit of time to actually do an analysis of the mystery writer’s work and to comment on four writers takes up quite a fair bit of time which many writers frankly do not have.
ii) Lack of confidence. Many writers do not have confidence in their own writing abilities and if they lack confidence in their own ability, they will not have the confidence as well to comment on other's works.
iii) Fear of causing offence. Some of the works by the mystery writers are not the most brilliant of works and rather than comment likewise, they would rather not comment so as not cause offence to the mystery writers.
So who is braving this to comment and why are they doing so? Well by the looks of it, it would appear to be some of the more well-established members of our writing community. You need only look at a few names: Lord Durham, Rensslaer, Peter Ebessen, Amric ect. Amric puts this down to:

One of the biggest things is that MOST of the forum dwellers do NOT go into the General Discussion Forum area very often, if at all. The reason that many of the well established writers comment is that we all feel that it is good to comment on a story that someone has taken the time and effort to craft so that we can critique it.
And, you know, he is right. Just because someone is more well-established in AARland doesn’t mean that his writing is already going to be any better than your own. Amric himself admitted that his writing is visibly improved while he has been doing GtA, meaning that it must have been worse before. Establishment means nothing more than confidence, and to speak frankly, getting involved in something such as this, where the established writers are, is more likely to get you noticed and will likely improve your confidence in your own writing.

Not only that. As I said before, Amric said his writing had improved while he had been subscribed and writing for GtA, and that generally counts for all. You are not expected to go into GtA with an AAR CV gleaming like the sun. Not only do they guess who is writing what, but give critique and advise like no where else. Yes, perhaps you do get it some on your AARs, but few people ever speak out critically of something. If that continues, you will not have nearly the idea of what needs to be improved in your writing than if you stayed comfortable with the nice ‘great update’ comments in your AAR.

Amric: GtA is a unique creature. It was originally started as a way to showcase stories, guess who wrote the, and critique them. It has evolved to be less about the guessing who wrote what story to showcasing a writer’s talent and allowing people to critique it. It takes a special person to not only write a story, but to critique it. GtA is different than AARs. There everyone is nice. In GtA you get a critique that can be more ‘honest’. It might be tough, but it will definitely help you improve your writing skills.

Sure, if you ask for it in your AAR you can get brutally honest comments, but I think the GtA has become the place where you can showcase your talent and take a few hits. Sure, some things might sting, but you’ll come out of it a better writer, I promise you.
It really is a positive influence if you stick out your neck, write or comment on GtA, and get feedback, hints and all those other things which will help your own writing style to develop more than it would in many other places. The important lesson here is that if you don’t try to learn, you won’t learn. Finally, Redwolf leaves us with a few words to try and encourage you to join in the fun:

Redwolf: Do not be afraid to write or comment. As a writer, the comments offered to you will give you more insight into your writing than you will ever get from your AAR's comments and will help to improve your writing skills. As a commenter, the writers have made the effort to write a piece of work and they will really appreciate the comments you have for them and will also help them to analyse and improve their own writings.
Thank you for reading and I hope you have learnt some lessons from what I, Redwolf and Amric have said. Do give GtA a thought next time you delve into the AARland General Discussion Forum and if you require anymore information, do either ask on the GtA thread of PM Amric.

On behalf of myself and AARland, I would like to thank Amric and Redwolf for conducting the interviews and I hope you enjoyed the read.

robou is the author of
"I'm sorry, you're not the only one..."
 

canonized

Heartbreaker
68 Badges
Oct 10, 2006
5.917
7
forum.paradoxplaza.com
  • Crusader Kings II: Horse Lords
  • Victoria: Revolutions
  • Rome Gold
  • Victoria 2
  • Victoria 2: A House Divided
  • Victoria 2: Heart of Darkness
  • 200k Club
  • 500k Club
  • Cities: Skylines
  • Europa Universalis IV: El Dorado
  • Europa Universalis IV: Pre-order
  • Crusader Kings II: Way of Life
  • Europa Universalis IV: Common Sense
  • Europa Universalis IV: Res Publica
  • Cities: Skylines - After Dark
  • Europa Universalis IV: Cossacks
  • Crusader Kings II: Conclave
  • Europa Universalis IV: Mare Nostrum
  • Stellaris
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Cadet
  • Crusader Kings II: Reapers Due
  • Europa Universalis IV: Rights of Man
  • Tyranny: Archon Edition
  • Stellaris: Leviathans Story Pack
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Together for Victory
  • Crusader Kings III
  • Europa Universalis III Complete
  • Hearts of Iron II: Armageddon
  • Crusader Kings II
  • Crusader Kings II: Charlemagne
  • Crusader Kings II: Legacy of Rome
  • Crusader Kings II: The Old Gods
  • Crusader Kings II: Rajas of India
  • Crusader Kings II: The Republic
  • Crusader Kings II: Sons of Abraham
  • Crusader Kings II: Sunset Invasion
  • Crusader Kings II: Sword of Islam
  • Europa Universalis III
  • Europa Universalis III: Chronicles
  • Divine Wind
  • Europa Universalis IV: Art of War
  • Europa Universalis IV: Conquest of Paradise
  • Europa Universalis IV: Wealth of Nations
  • Hearts of Iron III: Their Finest Hour
  • Hearts of Iron III Collection
  • Heir to the Throne
  • Europa Universalis III Complete
  • Leviathan: Warships
  • March of the Eagles
[anchor=I9]The Southern Road to War: a “Confederate Armageddon Mod” review[/anchor]
By trekaddict

The American Civil War is surely one of the most interesting periods of American history. Full of moral and military issues it is easy to speculate “what if...”. The Confederate Armageddon mod made by CSABadass and many other contributors including myself does just that: What of the Confederate States of America had won the American Civil War and survived into the 1930s? The basic premise is that the CSA won the Civil War thanks to British intervention and are now one of the two powers in North America besides Canada.

I will try to give you an unbiased picture of this mod in the following Article.

First things first. Some stats about the whole thing. As previously mentioned this mod was made by CSABadass, and is currently being worked on by him and many other contributers including myself, although I mainly did some graphics work and occasionally offer game feedback and more or less creative Ideas to further the mod. The newest version is version 2.1, so as you can see this is a matured mod despite being nowhere near the size of mods like Kaiserreich or MDS in both magnitude and modders involved. The mod is for Armageddon only.


Installation and how to get started:

The mod is fully JSGME compatible, and when you download the full version a .exe is even included in the pack. Weter you choose a hardinstall or not does not matter, both work just fine. When you start the game you are greeted by a well-made custom loading screen that unfortunately does not extend into the menu background once the game has started and only comes in the default resolution. Upon selecting Single player you have to find the correct scenario labelled “The Southern Road to War”. Hidden away between the “Southern Conquests” and Operation Watchtower Battle-scenarios the icon could be a bit better to find, but what's life without a few challenges eh? The rest of the startup is just like any other HOI2 game.

Gameplay:

The mod is intended to be played as CSA only, so if you play as another nation the Confederate AI is incredibly lazy, it kind of reminds me of the old pre-Doomsday British AI once you had taken France. But if you really do play as the Confederate States the game is simply put very very very nice, if not to say awesome. The Confederacy is fun to play, mainly because it is a democratic nation for a change, unlike in the “Settling Accounts” mod. Your starting forces are small and outdated, numbering only two Infantry- and a Cavalry Division along with a Squadron of Interceptors and Tactical Bombers each. The CSN consists of a single Aircraft Carrier and several Battleships and support Units. On Normal you have a base IC of 80 with 48 effective IC. Now why should one play a nation with a mediocre Army and a small Industry? It is the simply challenge the mod offers. For example in the beginning you don't have a techteam with an Artillery Skill, so tech-rushing Infantry and Armour won't work. You have a small effective IC and even fewer MP, so swarming the Enemy like most players do it with Nat. China won't work either, so you'll most likely end up fighting World War 2 with a small, good but not superbly equipped Army, just like it would be in real life and have to rely on your allies. Before you scroll away from this article however please bear with me, as I will talk about the AI later. The downside of the CSA's close alignment to Britain is that there are no events for a Communist or Fascist CSA, so if you want a second war between the states you have to either cheat or write your own events, something made easy by the inclusion of a junk.txt in the event folder where you are supposed to place all your own custom events which is to be honest something I have not seen before. There are however appropriate ministers, so if you really want it you can have a Communist or Nazi CSA, it is however much more fun to play the British-aligned CS. The CSA is friendly towards the allies but just as isolationist as the USA.
As previously mentioned the techteams you have at the start lack Artillery skills, but overall they are pretty good, and until you get Artillery teams in 1938 you can still advance technology, only a bit slower than you might be used to from the other vanilla nations. The first years are business as usual. You build up your Army, Navy and Air Force. But unlike France and Britain you do not sit around and bore yourself to death, as there are some rather nice events that shorten the wait, but what they are is a secret, you will have to play to find out. Once the war is on it is again nothing much new, as far as I can tell the combat system is unaltered, su no surprises there, so your beloved BB/CVL/CL/DD fleets still work.

Friend or Foe – AI:

Now the AI. As previously mentioned the CS AI is not too great, but if you are playing the CS yourself yo will quickly see that the other AI countries are fighting surprisingly good. The mod uses a modified TRP AI, which surprised me when I got back into the mod a while back. When you play the first time you may see lot's of things that are seldom to impossible in the Vanilla game, from Germany making a successful Sealion to actually triggering the Bitter Peace with the Soviet Union to Italy taking Suez in 1940 and Nationalist China defeating Japan by 1942, and these are only the things I have witnessed myself. When you have disabled Expeditionary Forces the AI ships its own units to the front and uses them well. When I advanced through a post-BP Russia to Germany the British AI sent roughly forty Divisions and used them well, advancing on its own and always in strength, so I could actually let the AI handle my entire southern Front and concentrate my Armies for the push on Berlin while the British AI used its own forces to clean out the Balkans.

Another great thing about the AI is that they are actually building and using Nuclear bombs. Imagine my surprise when I have just dropped the first Confederate Nuke on Berlin only to see the British drop the bomb on Dortmund a few days later. The AI still only randomly nukes provinces and only in “core” countries, meaning the provinces the enemy started with. In my own game the British AI dropped the bombs as fast as they made them, so expect a slow but steady rain of bombs decimating the homeland. By the time I defeated Germany the IC in the Ruhr was down to about four combined in all the Westfalen provinces.


Summary:

All in all the Confederate Armageddon mod is a fun thing to play and the combination of the unusual setting and the splendid AI behaviour make it a unique experience with great replay value. The downsides are that you are pretty much stuck to one path and that the events that let you enter the Allies could be a bit more fleshed out, but these are only minor things. The mod is well balanced between challenging gameplay fun and can only be recommended when you want to get away from the usual conquering sprees as Germany or the Soviet Union.

The mod gets a definite well done from me. I hope you agree and don't let the damn Yankees hold you down!

trekaddict is the author of
Against all Odds: The United Kingdom in World War Two
 

canonized

Heartbreaker
68 Badges
Oct 10, 2006
5.917
7
forum.paradoxplaza.com
  • Crusader Kings II: Horse Lords
  • Victoria: Revolutions
  • Rome Gold
  • Victoria 2
  • Victoria 2: A House Divided
  • Victoria 2: Heart of Darkness
  • 200k Club
  • 500k Club
  • Cities: Skylines
  • Europa Universalis IV: El Dorado
  • Europa Universalis IV: Pre-order
  • Crusader Kings II: Way of Life
  • Europa Universalis IV: Common Sense
  • Europa Universalis IV: Res Publica
  • Cities: Skylines - After Dark
  • Europa Universalis IV: Cossacks
  • Crusader Kings II: Conclave
  • Europa Universalis IV: Mare Nostrum
  • Stellaris
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Cadet
  • Crusader Kings II: Reapers Due
  • Europa Universalis IV: Rights of Man
  • Tyranny: Archon Edition
  • Stellaris: Leviathans Story Pack
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Together for Victory
  • Crusader Kings III
  • Europa Universalis III Complete
  • Hearts of Iron II: Armageddon
  • Crusader Kings II
  • Crusader Kings II: Charlemagne
  • Crusader Kings II: Legacy of Rome
  • Crusader Kings II: The Old Gods
  • Crusader Kings II: Rajas of India
  • Crusader Kings II: The Republic
  • Crusader Kings II: Sons of Abraham
  • Crusader Kings II: Sunset Invasion
  • Crusader Kings II: Sword of Islam
  • Europa Universalis III
  • Europa Universalis III: Chronicles
  • Divine Wind
  • Europa Universalis IV: Art of War
  • Europa Universalis IV: Conquest of Paradise
  • Europa Universalis IV: Wealth of Nations
  • Hearts of Iron III: Their Finest Hour
  • Hearts of Iron III Collection
  • Heir to the Throne
  • Europa Universalis III Complete
  • Leviathan: Warships
  • March of the Eagles
[anchor=I10]The Weekly AwAARds for July 2008![/anchor]
By SPL

Showcase​

The first winner of the weekly AAR Showcase was For God's Sake - A Castile AAR (EU3) by PrawnStar. Castille tries to turn the world into a Catholic one, the war never stops there!

The second winner of the weekly AAR Showcase was Scotland the Brave (....but a wee bit cowardly sometimes....) (EU3) by Babington-Smyth. Everybody loves to see the Scottish do well in EU3 for once, especially when they are creating an overseas Scottish Empire!

The third winner of the weekly AAR Showcase was Making the table round - A Cameroonian AAR (HOI2) by Yumo. A Communist Cameroon trying to keep independence and deal with the European powers around them, a very interesting AAR.

Fan of the Week​
These folks' comments are always appreciated!

The first Fan of the Week was Robou.

The second Fan of the Week was Comagoosie.

The third Fan of the Week was Eber.

The fourth Fan of the Week was Qorten.

Character Writer of the Week​

The first Character Writer of the Week was Draco Rexus for For King and Country (HOI2). For King and Country features fantastic descriptions on events that occur in-game, is it an alternate history or a simple HOI2 game? I'll have to get back to you on that one.

The second Character Writer of the Week was Hardraade for Return to Glory: A Germania AAR (HOI2). Much like For King and Country, Return to Glory: A Germania AAR features many high quality updates and descriptions about the game that make it seem like a best-selling novel.

The third Character Writer of the Week was robou for 'I'm sorry, but you're not the only one...' (Vicky). Action follows Nikolai everywhere, and so do the French.

The forth Character Writer of the Week was Snugglie for Lotharingia -- A tale of resurrection (CK). The massive amount of work put into the updates can be seen at a glance. Whether there are maps or letters in the update or not, depth in the writing is always present, a few surprises here and there too!


Writer of the week​

The first Writer of the Week was English Patriot for I, Silvagenus - A Rome AAR (Rome). English Patriot has captured Roman life very well in the AAR, an extremely unique AAR.

The second Writer of the Week was robou for Carefully Applied Force: A Prussian AAR (Vicky). A very nice History Book style AAR, the status of the world is often being shown with great detail.

The third Writer of the Week was crusaderknight for Regnum Iudaeorum - The Lost Ten Tribes Of Israel (Rome). The lost tribes, a very interesting tale. Where will the tribes end up next?

The fourth Writer of the Week was AlexanderPrimus for Chronicles of the Golden Cross (CK). AlexanderPrimus enjoys his teasers, once you start reading you won't want to stop!


Birthdays​

July 5th - Lord E
July 8th - billy bob
July 9th - Eärendil
July 17th - TheExecuter
July 17th - Stroph1
July 19th - stnylan

*based off threads posted in the "AARs and Fanfiction - General Discussions" forum, these are NOT supposed to represent ALL the birthdays of AARlanders

SPL is the author of
Moldau, Moldavia, Moldova - Mare, Mareata, Magnifica
 

canonized

Heartbreaker
68 Badges
Oct 10, 2006
5.917
7
forum.paradoxplaza.com
  • Crusader Kings II: Horse Lords
  • Victoria: Revolutions
  • Rome Gold
  • Victoria 2
  • Victoria 2: A House Divided
  • Victoria 2: Heart of Darkness
  • 200k Club
  • 500k Club
  • Cities: Skylines
  • Europa Universalis IV: El Dorado
  • Europa Universalis IV: Pre-order
  • Crusader Kings II: Way of Life
  • Europa Universalis IV: Common Sense
  • Europa Universalis IV: Res Publica
  • Cities: Skylines - After Dark
  • Europa Universalis IV: Cossacks
  • Crusader Kings II: Conclave
  • Europa Universalis IV: Mare Nostrum
  • Stellaris
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Cadet
  • Crusader Kings II: Reapers Due
  • Europa Universalis IV: Rights of Man
  • Tyranny: Archon Edition
  • Stellaris: Leviathans Story Pack
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Together for Victory
  • Crusader Kings III
  • Europa Universalis III Complete
  • Hearts of Iron II: Armageddon
  • Crusader Kings II
  • Crusader Kings II: Charlemagne
  • Crusader Kings II: Legacy of Rome
  • Crusader Kings II: The Old Gods
  • Crusader Kings II: Rajas of India
  • Crusader Kings II: The Republic
  • Crusader Kings II: Sons of Abraham
  • Crusader Kings II: Sunset Invasion
  • Crusader Kings II: Sword of Islam
  • Europa Universalis III
  • Europa Universalis III: Chronicles
  • Divine Wind
  • Europa Universalis IV: Art of War
  • Europa Universalis IV: Conquest of Paradise
  • Europa Universalis IV: Wealth of Nations
  • Hearts of Iron III: Their Finest Hour
  • Hearts of Iron III Collection
  • Heir to the Throne
  • Europa Universalis III Complete
  • Leviathan: Warships
  • March of the Eagles
[anchor=I11]The Thirty Year’s War[/anchor]
About Religion and the Balance of Power
by Qorten

Origins

In 1555 the Peace of Augsburg was signed by Emperor Charles V. It was designed to end hostilities between Catholics and Protestants in the Holy Roman Empire. The peace treaty did not solve the underlying religious conflict though. Neither did it include anything about Calvinism, which started to spread through the Empire soon after the treaty was signed.

The Calvinists, feeling threatened by recent hostilities, formed the League of Evangelical Union in 1608. It was a defensive alliance under the leadership of the Palatinate. This prompted the Catholics to form the Catholic League in 1609 under Bavarian leadership.

Thus the Holy Roman Empire was a powder keg ready to explode. All it needed was a spark, which was provided in 1618 in Prague, Bohemia.

Bohemian Revolt 1618-1620

In 1617 the fiercely Catholic Ferdinand of Styria was elected Crown Prince of Bohemia. The Protestant Bohemian nobles feared losing their religious rights and staged a coup against the Catholic advisors running the state affairs in absence of Ferdinand. The two most hated of them were thrown out of the window of Hradcany Castle in Prague but survived, in May 1618.

The Bohemians now chose Elector Frederick V of the Palatinate, leader of the evangelical Union, as their king. He united his German and Bohemian forces, but could not stand against the military might of both the Emperor and the Catholic League. In 1620 Frederick was defeated at the Battle of the White Mountain near Prague. He fled to the Dutch Republic.

Danish Intervention 1620-1629

From 1620 to 1625 the war was mainly fought by mercenary armies in the Palatinate, where they battled mostly Spanish armies. The Catholics won great successes and more and more the great Protestant nations became worried. Christian IV of Denmark-Norway entered the war in 1625, urged by England and the Dutch Republic, as well as Cardinal Richelieu in France. Despite being Catholic, the French feared the Habsburg encircling them.

Christian took two armies to northern Germany. Luck was against the Protestants again a they were opposed and defeated by the Imperial generals Tilly and Wallenstein. Tilly defeated Christian at the battle of Lutter, near Salzgitter. Wallenstein defeated the second Danish army under command of Ernst von Mansfeld at the Battle of Dessau Bridge, near Dessau. Wallenstein then went further north and occupied all Danish territories on the mainland, forcing Christian IV to sign peace in 1629.






Swedish Intervention 1630-1635

Sweden had been at war with Poland before it’s entry into the Thirty Year’s War. Led by king Gustav Adolph they had gained some small successes. After concluding a peace Gustav returned to Sweden. There he reformed his army, that was about to prove the most effective of it’s time.

In 1630 Gustav landed at Peenemünde with about 13 000 men. The first major clash between Gustav and a Catholic general happened in 1631, at the battle of Breitenfels, near Leipzig. Gustav and his ally, the Elector of Saxony, joined forces against General Tilly. Gustav’s reformed army totally crushed the Imperials. Tilly, injured, had almost no army left, while Gustav strengthened his by recruiting prisoners.

The Swedes now marched towards Rhine, then following the river south, threatening the lands of the Catholic League. During a battle along the Lech Tilly was killed and Wallenstein became the new leader of all Catholic troops.

Wallenstein chose to take his army north, in an effort to cut Gustav’s supply lines. The Swedish king had no option but to follow him. The inevitable clash took place near Leipzig, at the battle of Lützen, in November 1632. The Swedish won, but paid a high price with the death on the battlefield of king Gustav Adolph.

With Gustav Adolph gone and Catholic forces weary of the war peace negotiations were started between Sweden, Saxony, Brandenburg and the leader of the Catholic armies, Wallenstein. Ferdinand, the Emperor, feared treason and removed Wallenstein from command. The negotiations continued, producing the Peace of Prague in 1635. This peace was however in favour of the Habsburgs and France could not accept it.

French Intervention 1635-1648

In May 1635 France declared war on Spain and in August 1636 on the Holy Roman Empire. Spain now faced two enemies in the Lowlands, as the Eighty Year’s War was still raging against the Dutch Republic. Austria and the Catholic League, tired from 17 years of war, couldn’t hold against the French generals Condé and Turenne, along with renewed Swedish attacks by the generals Baner and Torstensson.

The old Emperor Ferdinand II died in 1637, Richelieu in 1642, the French king Louis XIII in 1643. The new leaders thirsted for peace. The final blow was the defeat for the Spanish at Rocroi in 1643.

The Peace of Westphalia

The French, Swedes and Dutch were the victors of the war. France gained most of Alsace and Lorraine, reaching the Rhine. Sweden gained western Pomerania, Bremen and Verden and thus control of the mouth of the Oder, Weser and Elbe, three major German rivers. The Dutch Republic was officially recognized an independent nation.

On religious matters all parties recognized the Peace of Augsburg again, which now also included the Calvinists. Chrsistians living in principalities where their denomination was not the majority were given the right to practice their faith publicly at certain hours and in private at will.

Qorten is the author of
BohemiAAR: An Alternate History
 

canonized

Heartbreaker
68 Badges
Oct 10, 2006
5.917
7
forum.paradoxplaza.com
  • Crusader Kings II: Horse Lords
  • Victoria: Revolutions
  • Rome Gold
  • Victoria 2
  • Victoria 2: A House Divided
  • Victoria 2: Heart of Darkness
  • 200k Club
  • 500k Club
  • Cities: Skylines
  • Europa Universalis IV: El Dorado
  • Europa Universalis IV: Pre-order
  • Crusader Kings II: Way of Life
  • Europa Universalis IV: Common Sense
  • Europa Universalis IV: Res Publica
  • Cities: Skylines - After Dark
  • Europa Universalis IV: Cossacks
  • Crusader Kings II: Conclave
  • Europa Universalis IV: Mare Nostrum
  • Stellaris
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Cadet
  • Crusader Kings II: Reapers Due
  • Europa Universalis IV: Rights of Man
  • Tyranny: Archon Edition
  • Stellaris: Leviathans Story Pack
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Together for Victory
  • Crusader Kings III
  • Europa Universalis III Complete
  • Hearts of Iron II: Armageddon
  • Crusader Kings II
  • Crusader Kings II: Charlemagne
  • Crusader Kings II: Legacy of Rome
  • Crusader Kings II: The Old Gods
  • Crusader Kings II: Rajas of India
  • Crusader Kings II: The Republic
  • Crusader Kings II: Sons of Abraham
  • Crusader Kings II: Sunset Invasion
  • Crusader Kings II: Sword of Islam
  • Europa Universalis III
  • Europa Universalis III: Chronicles
  • Divine Wind
  • Europa Universalis IV: Art of War
  • Europa Universalis IV: Conquest of Paradise
  • Europa Universalis IV: Wealth of Nations
  • Hearts of Iron III: Their Finest Hour
  • Hearts of Iron III Collection
  • Heir to the Throne
  • Europa Universalis III Complete
  • Leviathan: Warships
  • March of the Eagles
[anchor=I12]Post World War Two Iran[/anchor]
By Sematary

Iran has gone through a lot of change in the last 63 years, since the end of World War II. From a Shah that was backed by the West, to Ayatollah Khomeini and the Islamic theocracy of the present day. Some of the things are a modernization, an increasingly autocratic ruler, a revolution, a civil war that did not last long, a long war with Iraq, and now economic isolation. Even though they are in the corner of a corner of the world that is mostly ignored, except for oil reasons, the country has been in the forefront of the international stage since the revolution of 78-79. After World War II they were a pro West country that bordered the CCCP, which lead to a lot of importance being attached to them that was in any other time undue. In the fifties there was the nationalizing of the Anglo-Iranian Oil Company and the American and British coup putting the Shah in a monarchy. The 70s saw dissatisfaction of the people start boiling and the last two years of the 70s was the revolution and the installation of an Islamic theocracy. There is also the Iranian Hostage Crisis in which Americas were held hostage for 444 days, President Carter’s inability to do anything is thought to be one of the large factors that lead to President Regan winning that election. The next large event was the 1980-88 Iran Iraq War, which is the war that gave Saddam Hussein the weapons that his country was later invaded for in the early 2000s, and the Iran-Contra scandal. Since that war Iran has became a large regional power in the Middle East, and has recently been in the news almost daily for its nuclear program and the supposed funding of insurgents in Iraq. Even with economic sanctions of various strengths from almost every country, Serbia is a notable exception, the current government of Iran has a lot of options. It has kept the country together since the revolution and has done a job well enough to keep the people from not rebelling. A real question being asked by the rest of the world is how long the people will be willing to submit to the Islamic fundamentalism and the economic sanctions.

Mohammad Reza Pahlavi took the throne on September 16, 1941 after the abdication of his father. His wish was to continue the reformation of his father, but soon after he became king a struggle for control began between the Shah and an older professional politician, the nationalistic Mohammad Mosaddegh. Despite his promise to reign as a constitutional monarch who would defer to the power of the parliamentary government, Mohammad Reza Pahlavi increasingly involved himself in governmental affairs. He concentrated on reviving the army and ensuring that it would remain under royal control as the monarchy's main power base. In 1949 an assassination attempt on the Shah, attributed to the pro-Soviet Tudeh Party, resulted in the banning of that party and the expansion of the Shah's constitutional powers. In 1951, the Majlis (parliament) named Mohammad Mossadegh as new prime minister by a vote of 79–12, who shortly after nationalized the Anglo-Iranian Oil Company. Mossadegh was opposed by the Shah who feared a resulting oil embargo imposed by the west would leave Iran in economical ruin. The Shah fled Iran but returned when the United Kingdom and United States staged a coup against Mossadegh in August 1953. Mossadegh was then arrested by pro-Shah army forces. In the context of regional turmoil and the Cold War, the Shah established himself as an indispensable ally of the West. Domestically, he advocated reform policies, culminating in the 1963 program known as the White Revolution, which included land reform, extension of voting rights to women, and the elimination of illiteracy. Major plans to build Iran's infrastructure were undertaken, a new middle class began flourishing and in less than two decades Iran became the undisputable major economical and military power of the Middle East. However, these measures and the increasing arbitrariness of the Shah's rule provoked religious leaders who feared losing their traditional authority, and intellectuals seeking democratic reforms. These opponents criticized the Shah for his reforms or for violation of the constitution, which placed limits on royal power and provided for a representative government. The Shah saw himself as heir to the kings of ancient Iran, and in 1971 he held a celebration of 2,500 years of Persian monarchy. In 1976 he replaced the calendar with an "Imperial" calendar, which began with the foundation of the Persian Empire more than 25 centuries earlier. These actions were viewed as un-Islamic and resulted in more religious opposition by the clergy. As this continued more and more people started joining sides with the clergy who used all of their power to attack the Shah and gain more support. This would culminate in the Iranian Revolution of 1978-79.

Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini is believed to have been born in early 1902, but no one is quite sure because of poor records. He was born as Ruhollah Mousavi, taking the surname Khomeini later. His grandfather was a rich man who lived in India, who later moved to Iran and married. His grandfather settled in Khomein and when he died his wealth was split up and disappeared. On his father's side he could trace his heritage back to Mohammad the Prophet of Islam. When Khomeini was a few months old his father was killed, although again why is not clear. This greatly influenced his life because he was now raised by his mother and aunt. Almost nothing is known of what happens until he is 15 or 16 years old. When he is 15 or 16 both his mother and his aunt die in the same year, he and his brother who he is now living with mourn the women for the traditional 40 days each. After this he goes to the seminary Arak under Ayatollah Sheikh Abdol-Karim Haeri-Yazdi to learn more religious teachings. Soon after he becomes an Ayatollah and according to the tradition takes his birth town as his surname. In 1963 he publicly denounced the government of Shah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi. He was thereby imprisoned for 8 months, and upon his release in 1964 he made a similar denunciation of the United States. This led to his forced exile out of Iran. He initially went to Turkey, before later being allowed to move to Iraq. During this time people were slowly starting a rebellion, and Khomeini was one of the out spoken leaders of this rebellion. The leading voice of the rebellion, Dr. Ali Shariati, was suddenly killed and Khomeini was now the leading voice of the rebellion. In 1978 Vice President Saddam Hussein of Iraq reacting under pressure from the Shah exiled Khomeini. The Shah had pressured Saddam because he thought if Khomeini was farther away from Iran his voice wouldn't be heard as much. Khomeini moved to France and with the more modern technology was being heard more and listened to more. Alexandre de Marenches, the head of the French secret services, suggested to the Shah that they could make sure Khomeini had "a fatal accident" which the Shah declined. Now one may ask why he declined when it is offered that the leader of a rebellion in his country is to be killed, he did so because he figured that if Khomeini died he would be martyred and the rebellion would become violent. A wise decision but in 1979 the rebellion became violent and over ran the country forcing the Shah to the U.S. Soon after Khomeini was brought back to Iran and given a hero's welcome. He was hailed as a living god by the revolutionaries. On March 30-31 1979 all Iranians 16 and older voted on the issue of making the new Iranian government an Islamic "Republic", 98% said yes. Ayatollah Khomeini was now voted "Supreme Leader" (roughly their version of president) for life. On November 4, 1979, a group of students, all of whom were ardent followers of Khomeini, seized the United States embassy in Tehran, and took 63 American citizens as hostage. Three additional hostages were taken at the Iranian Foreign Ministry. Thirteen of the 63 hostages were released (mostly women and black personnel) within two weeks, and one more in July 1980. The remaining fifty men and two women were held for 444 days, this is known as the Iran hostage crisis. Khomeini was backing the takeover within a day and President Carter started trying to get the hostages release. Carter tried one rescue attempt called Operation Eagle Claw. On the night of April 24, 1980, as the first part of the operation, a number of C-130 transport airplanes rendezvoused with eight RH-53 helicopters at an airstrip in the Great Salt Desert of Eastern Iran, near Tabas. Two helicopters broke down in a sandstorm and a third one was damaged on landing. The mission was aborted, but as the aircraft took off again one helicopter clipped a C-130 and crashed, killing eight U.S. servicemen and injuring more than four. The CIA had a plan that to this day they swear up and down would have worked but was not accepted by Carter. This one event is assumed to be Carter's downfall leading to Regan becoming president. Right after Regan's inauguration Khomeini let the flight holding the hostages leave for France then the U.S.


In 1980 Khomeini began calling for similar style Islamic revolutions across the Muslim world. Saddam Hussein, leader of the secular Ba'athist Iraqi state, was ambitious to occupy his oil-rich neighbor (the province of Khuzestan, in particular) and believed Iran to be weakened due to the Revolution and in a state of upheaval and turmoil. Hussein was also anxious to prevent the success of Shi'a revolutionaries in Iran inciting Iraq's Shi'a majority. Iraq soon launched a full scale invasion of Iran, starting what would become the eight-year-long Iran-Iraq War (September 1980 - August 1988). Supported by the West, the Iraqi invasion of Iran, intended to contain the ideological spread of potential Islamist revolutions in the oil-rich Persian Gulf states, ironically enhanced Khomeini's stature and allowed him to consolidate and stabilize his leadership. During the war, the people of Iran rallied around Khomeini and his government, and his personal popularity and power became unmatched, as Khomeini urged all Iranians to defend their country and religion against the secular Iraqi regime. Two years after the war began, in 1982, Iraq accepted the idea of a cease-fire and negotiations concerning the border dispute. Iraq also accepted, with help of Saudi-Arabia, to pay some of the damages. Khomeini probably perceived the Iraqi diplomatic retreat as a sign of further weakness. Khomeini continuously rejected a cease-fire, demanding huge reparation payments and an end to Hussein’s rule before it would stop fighting. These conditions effectively killed any hope of a peaceful resolution. Consequently the war continued for another six years, with 450,000 to 950,000 casualties on the Iranian side and the use Chemical Weapons by the Iraqi military. The Iraqis were backed by the U.S. and it was the U.S. government that gave Chemical and Biological weapons to Saddam, which he later used against the Kurds.

Modern Iran is known for its intolerance and is even picking up a reputation similar to the Soviet Union had. Characterized by its intolerance, Islamic fundamentalism, and hatred of the West Iran is seen as one of the largest traditional threats to the United States. In the recent past it was in the news over the fact that it was trying to develop nuclear capabilities, with Israel being its number one target if it were to ever get nuclear missiles. Since then it is thought that the program has been shut down and no country is actively supporting Iran’s ambitions on this front. The US military strongly believes that Iran is giving funding, weapons, as well as possible training and housing for insurgents in Iraq. While the military has yet to give solid evidence of such claims, the claims are far from unbelievable. On the economic front, Serbia is one of the only countries that have unrestricted trade with Iran and recently United States Steel and Dell have made Serbia their Eastern European Headquarters. From what the average American who cares can tell Iran is not floundering but is not advancing either. Several intelligence agencies in the West have said that the people are discontent enough to support a rebellion if one should start but no one is willing to start one. No one is quite sure what will happen for Iran but it seems that its future is wide open and just about anything can happen.

This paper only begins to cover Post World War II Iran and one could write entire books about every decade from then to now. The intent is to show a glimpse of Iran and hope that one looks into it more. As one can see a lot has happened in those 63 years and more will happen. Iran is one of two major players in the Middle East right now with the United States being the other player who is almost always opposed to Iran. It has gone from a nationalistic Constitutional Monarchy to for a short time a Democracy, to a Monarchy, and finally to the current Theocracy. Revolution, war, and isolation have been the major things the country has seen in that time period. And no matter how much one knows about the country one is still forced to ask what’s next?




Sources:
www.Wikipedia.com


A History of Iran: Empire of the Mind by Micheal Axworthy
The Quest for Democracy in Iran: A Century of Struggle against Authoritarian Rule by Fakhreddin Azimi
Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini (Spiritual Leaders and Thinkers) by Anne M. Todd

semetary is the author of America: The Guardian of the West.
 

canonized

Heartbreaker
68 Badges
Oct 10, 2006
5.917
7
forum.paradoxplaza.com
  • Crusader Kings II: Horse Lords
  • Victoria: Revolutions
  • Rome Gold
  • Victoria 2
  • Victoria 2: A House Divided
  • Victoria 2: Heart of Darkness
  • 200k Club
  • 500k Club
  • Cities: Skylines
  • Europa Universalis IV: El Dorado
  • Europa Universalis IV: Pre-order
  • Crusader Kings II: Way of Life
  • Europa Universalis IV: Common Sense
  • Europa Universalis IV: Res Publica
  • Cities: Skylines - After Dark
  • Europa Universalis IV: Cossacks
  • Crusader Kings II: Conclave
  • Europa Universalis IV: Mare Nostrum
  • Stellaris
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Cadet
  • Crusader Kings II: Reapers Due
  • Europa Universalis IV: Rights of Man
  • Tyranny: Archon Edition
  • Stellaris: Leviathans Story Pack
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Together for Victory
  • Crusader Kings III
  • Europa Universalis III Complete
  • Hearts of Iron II: Armageddon
  • Crusader Kings II
  • Crusader Kings II: Charlemagne
  • Crusader Kings II: Legacy of Rome
  • Crusader Kings II: The Old Gods
  • Crusader Kings II: Rajas of India
  • Crusader Kings II: The Republic
  • Crusader Kings II: Sons of Abraham
  • Crusader Kings II: Sunset Invasion
  • Crusader Kings II: Sword of Islam
  • Europa Universalis III
  • Europa Universalis III: Chronicles
  • Divine Wind
  • Europa Universalis IV: Art of War
  • Europa Universalis IV: Conquest of Paradise
  • Europa Universalis IV: Wealth of Nations
  • Hearts of Iron III: Their Finest Hour
  • Hearts of Iron III Collection
  • Heir to the Throne
  • Europa Universalis III Complete
  • Leviathan: Warships
  • March of the Eagles
[anchor=I13]Capibara’s Hispanoamerican Corner[/anchor]
Section II: The Latin American Boom
By Capibara


Welcome to the second article of the Hispanoamerican Corner. After an overview of the origins of Spanish Literature in my previous article, this time I will start with the main theme of this section: The Latin American Boom and it’s writers. For this issue, an introduction will be given, as well as a quick overview of the main writers of this movement, focusing on each one of them in further articles.

The Latin American Boom was a literary movement that originated during the 1960s and the 1970s when young writers from Latin America became known in Europe, thanks to their innovative style and the publishing of their works by prestigious European publishing houses, specially the Spanish house Seix Barrel and it’s prize “Biblioteca Breve” (Short Library), that had the job of introducing this new group of young writers, that included Carlos Fuentes from Mexico, Julio Cortázar from Argentina, Gabriel García Márquez from Colombia, Mario Vargas Llosa from Perú and Alejo Carpentier from Cuba, among others.

Other factor that favored the development of the Boom, was the historical context of the epoch, characterized by the military dictatorships in many of the Latin American countries. This factor made the authors of the Boom include more social and political criticism against this regimes in their works, causing them to exile to Europe most of the times.

The Boom originates as a new literary style in Latin America, where the writers wouldn’t stick to one particular way of writing, but would try to explore and experiment in other areas, which would result in an innovative writing style, that would take influences from Latin American writers previous to the boom, like Jorge Luis Borges, considered the best Spanish speaking writer of the 20th century, and Mexican Juan Rulfo, as well as some English speaking writers, like Joyce and specially William Faulkner, mentioned by most of the Boom writers as one of their main influences.

Before proceeding with the boom aspects and it’s background, I will give the definition of the Boom that one of it’s writers, Mario Vargas Llosa, gave:

“There is clearly a rejection, that I believe is an essential part of the Boom, of the regionalist, folkloric literature, centered in the landscape and picturesque guys. The Boom, placed the stories in a more urban world and preoccupied both for the form and the themes.”

The first steps towards the Boom were taken during the 1940s, when the separation from Realism starts, with the new treatment of the themes and the experimentation with the language. Specifically, it was Argentinean writer Jorge Luis Borges who determined this new narrative constants. From these years we have, apart from Borges, Adolfo Bioy Casares, Miguel Ángel Asturias, Agustín Yáñez and Ernesto Sábato.

This renovation startede with Borges, would only increase during the next decade, where fantasy was fundamental, with the inclusion of new writers like Juan Carlos Onetti, with La Vida Breve (A Brief Life) and Para Una Tumba Sin Nombre (For a Grave With No Name) and Juan Rulfo with Pedro Páramo, considered one of the best novels of the previous century. In this same decade, some writers of the Boom, like Carlos Fuentes and Gabriel García Márquez, started writing their first novels, although they aren’t considered integral part of the Boom still.

However, the real consolidation of the new movement occurred in the 1960s, when there was a sudden interest and demand for Latin American literature in the United States and Europe. From this decade we have some of the best novels of the period, including La Ciudad y Los Perros (The City and The Dogs) by Vargas Llosa, Tres Tristes Tigres (Tree Sad Tigers) by Guillermo Cabrera Infante, Cambio de Piel (Change of Skin) by Carlos Fuentes and El Obsceno Pájaro de La Noche (The Obscene Bird of the Night) by José Donoso. All of this novels get international recognition and translation to several languages.

Just as the previous ones, during the next years, several novels, emblems of this period are published: Rayuela (Hopscoth) by Julio Cortázar, Cien Años de Soledad (One Hundred Years of Solitude) by Gabriel García Márquez, El Astillero (The Shipyard) by Juan Carlos Onetti, Sobre Héroes y Tumbas (About Heroes and Graves) by Ernesto Sábato, La Muerte de Artemio Cruz (The Death of Artemio Cruz) by Carlos Fuentes, Conversación en la Catedral (Conversation in the Cathedral) by Mario Vargas Llosa and Hijo del Hombre (Son of the Man) by Augusto Roa Bastos.

The decade of 1970 saw a change in the style of many of the Boom writers. Particularly thanks to the global situation of those years: the fluctuations in the global market, the political situation of the South American countries, among other factors, which leads to an increased social criticism in their works. During this years, it appears a new type of novel: the dictator novel, which, as the name says, tells about the dictators that ruled in Latin America then. An example of this kind of novel is La Fiesta Del Chivo (The Goat’s Party) by Mario Vargas Llosa, that narrates the life of Rafael Trujillo, dictator of the Dominican Republic.

One of the main characteristics for the Boom is the fact that the writers don’t stick to a single literary movement, like Realism or Modernism, but try to innovate, to look for new ways of expressing, this results in what have been called “the new novel”. However, despite of not following a single style or movement, the Boom has it’s own particular aspects, that difference it from other literary currents.

This aspects include a preference for the urban above rural, the history as a metaphor, a social denounce, product of the situation mentioned above, criticism to the moral of the high classes and the mazes of experience of the youth. Along this aspects, we find the renovation of formal aspects and narrative techniques the treatment of the language as an alive organism and sufficient in itself; the establishment of imaginary spaces that participate with the mythic, the interior monologue and the rupture, a new interpretation of the constant of time and space, and again, using the language in all it’s possible forms, dismounting it, reintegrating it, always invent a new possibility of unconceivable expressive potential. This new novel, due to this aspects, may be also known as “the novel of the language” as Rodríguez Monegal said.

One of the styles more used by the writers of the Boom, was the one called Magical Realism, which main feature was the use of fantasy situations that include: long lives in a biblical style, levitation, miracles, imaginary illnesses that are exaggerated (hyperbole). This situations are written by the author in a neutral tone, without remarking the magical situation, so the reader does not pay that much attention to them and they look like everyday situation. The best example, probably, of magical realism is Cien Años de Soledad by Gabriel García Márquez. This category also includes Pedro Páramo by Juan Rulfo, which, it must be mentioned was a great influence for the latter.

Thanks to the Boom, the way Latin American culture was seen in the world changed. But mainly, it helped opening the door to young writers, that, thanks to the success of the Boom writers, who, in many of the occasions, served as their mentors. This new generation, belongs to what is known as the Post-Boom, that, even as a product of the Boom, is distinct in various aspects, mainly the presence of female writers like Elena Poniatowska, Isabel Allende and Luisa Valenzuela, and the change of the perceived elitism of the Boom to a more simpler and readable style, as well as the return to realism.

This generation of writers changed the Latin American literature and their influence it’s still felt nowadays. Next month I will start talking about each one of them, so you may know more about their work and style, starting with Mexican writer, Carlos Fuentes.

Capibara is the author of Italy: Tales of Friendship, Treason, Love and Death
 
Last edited:

canonized

Heartbreaker
68 Badges
Oct 10, 2006
5.917
7
forum.paradoxplaza.com
  • Crusader Kings II: Horse Lords
  • Victoria: Revolutions
  • Rome Gold
  • Victoria 2
  • Victoria 2: A House Divided
  • Victoria 2: Heart of Darkness
  • 200k Club
  • 500k Club
  • Cities: Skylines
  • Europa Universalis IV: El Dorado
  • Europa Universalis IV: Pre-order
  • Crusader Kings II: Way of Life
  • Europa Universalis IV: Common Sense
  • Europa Universalis IV: Res Publica
  • Cities: Skylines - After Dark
  • Europa Universalis IV: Cossacks
  • Crusader Kings II: Conclave
  • Europa Universalis IV: Mare Nostrum
  • Stellaris
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Cadet
  • Crusader Kings II: Reapers Due
  • Europa Universalis IV: Rights of Man
  • Tyranny: Archon Edition
  • Stellaris: Leviathans Story Pack
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Together for Victory
  • Crusader Kings III
  • Europa Universalis III Complete
  • Hearts of Iron II: Armageddon
  • Crusader Kings II
  • Crusader Kings II: Charlemagne
  • Crusader Kings II: Legacy of Rome
  • Crusader Kings II: The Old Gods
  • Crusader Kings II: Rajas of India
  • Crusader Kings II: The Republic
  • Crusader Kings II: Sons of Abraham
  • Crusader Kings II: Sunset Invasion
  • Crusader Kings II: Sword of Islam
  • Europa Universalis III
  • Europa Universalis III: Chronicles
  • Divine Wind
  • Europa Universalis IV: Art of War
  • Europa Universalis IV: Conquest of Paradise
  • Europa Universalis IV: Wealth of Nations
  • Hearts of Iron III: Their Finest Hour
  • Hearts of Iron III Collection
  • Heir to the Throne
  • Europa Universalis III Complete
  • Leviathan: Warships
  • March of the Eagles
[anchor=I14]But what about Russia?[/anchor]
Degeme

“We Russians are not used to showing our love to everyone, only to those who we really love.” That is what I remember one of the guides told us about the people who live in Russia. From May to June I had the joy to travel to this amazing country with my friends, and here it’s my testimony.

It is such a contrast with the Mexican culture, not in a bad way, no, just different, let’s put some examples to explain myself.

In Mexico you enter to a restaurant, any restaurant and you can hear the conversation of the table that is far from you, because we like to talk very loud and let everyone know what are we talking about, in Russia however you go to a restaurant and all you can hear is the “¡Kling!” of the plates, everyone talks whispering and in a certain way that’s very nice and respectful, you can eat very quietly and in peace.

In the other hand we have the thing with the love, but by love I don’t mean the couple love, just the friend love, in Mexico we show how much we love our beloved ones by hugging them a lot, and by a lot I mean most of the time, however in Russia, just like the guide told us, they just evidence their love to the people they really love and not usually, just in special moments.

Knowing that, when I arrived to Moscow I started to see all these little things that make this culture so different to mine, something really good to see, the opportunity to look and compare others from me.

The language was the most interesting subject, at the beginning we had a lot of problem understanding the Russian alphabet, but by the end of the trip we were able to understand at least half of the things we were reading, although speaking Russian is more complicated, we could only talk like babies, making strange noises, waving our hands and telling the basic words, for example, “thanks” in Russian its “Spasiba” or “Beer” equals to “Piva”, as you can see we could say the elemental words but otherwise we used all kinds of movements and words to get people to understand us.

And, if I could resume my trip in one single experience, it would be with no doubts about the huge problem that it’s to cross the frontier: we were supposed to go for some days to Latvia, but the problem was that we didn’t had the visa to cross to Minsk, because we went in a train and it was necessary, so we had to get off the train and cross by foot, the fun thing was that we were ninety Mexicans with more than ninety bags so you can imagine how fun it was, it took us four hours to finally get into Latvia, adding the fact that we were attacked by giant and starving mosquitoes.

Would I return to Russia? Of course! There were a lot of things that we missed, we only went to the western part of Russia, near Europe, I’m very intrigued to know the culture from the side of China, that would be very interesting, also I would return to all the places I visited, but this time not as a tourist, but as a common citizen.

Degeme is a contributor and a new writer.