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    A treatise on the medieval history of Iberia: A Leon AAR

    Hello. This is my first attempt at an AAR, and possibly also my first ever forum post. I'll be writing this in a historybook style, trying to retain an overarching perspective on the whole of Iberia, rather than focusing solely on the dynastic tribulations of the characters I play, starting with King Alfonso Jimenez of Leon. This AAR turned out to be relatively war-focused, because, well - apparently that's what you spent most of your time doing if you lived in Medieval Iberia. It's also a little compact, kind of like an undergraduate-level book. Images should be clickable are clickable in the first post. So without further ado:


    Chapter 1: The late 11th century

    During the late 11th century, Christian Iberia underwent a consolidation and unification that, for a large part, laid the groundwork of the later Reconquista. While King Fernando The Great fractured his realm upon his death in 1065 by dividing it amongst his sons as per the noble custom, the Kingdoms of Leon, Aragon and Galicia were to be reunited only years later.

    1066 – 1084: The Reunification and expansion of Leon, Castile and Galicia under King Alfonso the Great
    Chiefly responsible for this reunification was the middle child of Fernando The Great: Alfonso, himself also known later as The Great. It is widely acknowledged that he, with an unprecedented degree of cynicism and ruthlessness, arranged for the deaths of his two heirless brothers, handily returning both their royal titles to himself as early as in 1067 – effectively tripling the size of his Kingdom without raising a singly levy.

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    Borders of Leon, 1066

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    Borders of Leon, 1067

    No incriminating evidence to suggest his involvement was ever found, nor did he ever claim public responsibility, and thus his rule remained legitimate. Evidence of not just his involvement, but of his engineering both deaths were uncovered by historians much later, in the form of letters containing his agents' orders; as well the personal notes of an individual thought to have filled the position of royal spymaster. Further corroborating this, some of his vassals – particularly his aunt – apparently assumed he was involved, something deducable from an interim period (1067-1068) of several civil wars, all of which King Alfonso won. The rebels – including his aunt – were stripped of lands and titles, which were then redistributed amongst his loyal followers.

    As Leon grew, nearby Christian rulers chafed, and the territories of Aragon and Navarra diminished greatly. King Alfonso was in a state of constant war against Muslim rulers, both as the defender and the aggressor. However, the contribution of Capetian France in maintaining – for instance – Barcelonian independence, must not be underestimated. While Barcelona and France had no formal political alliance, the French monarchs expressed a very clear desire to keep Barcelona as a Christian buffer state against Muslim influence on its southern border. From the years 1066 to 1085, Barcelona, too, was in a near-constant state of war, defending against Muslims incursion from Iberia, North Africa and even Sicily. It seems highly unlikely that without the continued intervention of France and Leon, Barcelona would have stayed neither Christian nor independent.

    When Leon was not defending itself or Barcelona from muslims, it attacked them. From 1070 King Alfonso had consolidated his position to such a degree that he could focus his efforts solely on conquest. Before 1080, Leon had absorbed the tiny Sheikdom of Albarracin. In a joint campaign during 1082-83 followed both the Emirate of Lleida and the northern portion of Zaragoza, essentially spelling the end of small, independent Muslim rulers in the northern half of Iberia.

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    Borders of Leon, 1083

    To the south, The Emirates of Cordoba, having absorbed Valencia, and Beja dominated. Mauretania held the southern reaches of Iberia, but ruled from their base of power in North Africa. Precisely what designs King Alfonso may have had on what remained of smaller Muslim territories, or even the weakened Christian rulers, remains unknown: After being maimed in a battle during the second 1084 campaign to retain Christian Barcelona, he died sometime in June that year, at the age of 44. The Throne passed to his eldest son Fernando, who, despite being the eldest, had come of age only months before.

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    Pictured: Artist's rendition of Prince Fernando, some time before his coronation. Aged approximately 16.


    1085 – 1100: Ascension of King Fernando II “The Bold”
    The time from 1085 to 1091 marks yet another a period of uninterrupted warfare. While civil war threatened immediately after the succession, it appears the Iberian lords simply postponed internal strife until after the most recent Muslim attempt at conquest was met and thrown back. Immediately after his coronation as Fernando II, the King rushed back to the front lines in Barcelona, presumably eager to both eject the Muslims and avenge his father. This time, however, France did not intervene, and against the formidable numbers of the Moors, Leon and Barcelona's combined armies could only stem the tide temporarily. Bereft of other measures, Fernando turned to mercenaries. Their pay came chiefly from whatever gold Fernando could scrape by ransoming prisoners from previously won battles.

    In a pitched battle inside Barcelona Proper, the combined armies of Leon, a mercenary company, and what was left of the Barcelonian army met with the Moorish Sultan in Battle. This is considered one of the defining moments in Iberian history – had King Fernando lost here, Christian Iberia would be broken and open to a full-scale Muslim invasion. Nearby muslim rulers counted on this, and at at least one – the Emir of Beja – began making preparations in earnest for the conquest of Leon.

    However, chiefly through Fernando's excellent military acumen, the battle was won – but more importantly, the Sultan himself was captured and taken prisoner. The moors routed, King Fernando returned to Leon, now rushing to defend his homeland against the Bejan invasion, which had gone ahead despite the Sultan's defeat. The Emir of Beja had counted on the armies of Leon being depleted from the war, and in part the Emir was right. Much to his chagrin, however, Fernando's mercenaries willingly came along, providing the required numbers for quickly expelling the Beja. Predictably, the Cordoban Emirate then seized the opportunity to invade Barcelona. In an unprecedented strategical gambit, King Ferrando invaded Cordoba itself after making a detour through Barcelona, delivering a decisive blow the armies of a bewildered Emir Isma'il. In Barcelona, the combined Barcelonian and Aragonian armies proved enough to expel the broken Cordobans, who were forced to cede significant territory to Leon after the war.

    Through careful Marriages, both King Alfonso and Ferrando worked to secure alliances with Monarchs who were both capable of fielding large armies, and not too far away to effectively deploy them in the event of a large-scale war. King Ferrando appears to have wasted no time in securing the formal allegiance of France. To gauge how deep the political ties between Capet and Jimenez were, one need only look to King Fernando's sisters, Princessses Nicor and Ermengarda – over the course of a few years, they married the brothers Prince Raimbaut and the young King Henri of France, respectively. Henri had ascended the Throne at the age of 19 in 1093, somehow still unmarried. As a result of these unions with the Capet House, Jimenez blood was found in almost all the great houses of Europe at some point during the middle ages.

    In 1096, King Fernando enacted what can only be described as a religious and cultural purge of his domain. While earlier conquest from Muslim territories had retained their old minor nobility, mayors, and the odd Mufti (at least until their inevitable conversion), King Fernando now unseated all these muslim leaders, filling the vacant positions with uplifted Christians of his choice.

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    Borders of Leon, 1099

    Summary of Chapter One
    While King Alfonso's ploy to reunite the three major Christian kingdoms in Northern Iberia may have been morally questionable, it is hard to contest its pragmatic benefits. Tripling his territory under one banner allowed Alfonso to become the most formidable defender of Christendom in the whole of Iberia, and the French and Leonian willingness to aid the minor principalities – particularly Barcelona – in retaining their independence proved immensely valuable in halting Muslim expansion. While King Alfonso's relatively early death could have spelled the end for the period of unity and expansion, his son proved immensely capable. Rather than losing momentum, the reign of Alfonso and even the earliest portion of Fernando's reign, saw the tables turned on the Muslims. In the face of increasing military power and Fernando's “aggressive defence”, they were forced to give up territory to the Christians – a development they almost certainly had not predicted, likely slowing their response.
    Last edited by Zealuu; 03-05-2012 at 08:49.

  2. #2
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    Chapter 2: Early 12th century Iberia
    In Iberia, the early 12th century would be dominated by a rapidly expanding Leon, during the continued and exceedingly long reign (1084-1133) of King Fernando II “The Bold”. During the latter half of his reign, his aggressive defence policy lead to a shift in power, bringing the Muslim rulers decisively into a defensive posture. This trend was not limited to just Iberia, as the successful Second Crusade would prove.

    The continuation of King Fernando's “Aggressive defense” strategy
    Leon's streak of conquests continued almost immediately after the Purge. In 1101, Mallorca and Murcia were forced to cede Almansa to Leon, creating a Christian enclave in the middle of Muslim Iberia, followed by Murcia itself in 1104. The few remaining independent West Mediterranean Island Lords were hard pressed by both France, the newfangled Italian Republics and the Muslims of North Africa, all seeking to establish their dominance.


    Borders of Leon in 1104

    It is worth noting that even though Leon at this time had more than the required power to conquer what remained of Aragon, Navarra and Barcelona. The fulminating Prince Erramun of Navarra in his advanced age also inexplicably threatened to invade Leon, providing ample opportunity and just cause. After briefly treating with his councillors, however, King Fernando found no reason to act on the threat. Where other Christian rulers had few qualms with absorbing smaller, independent provinces situated near their borders, King Fernando had instead taken a solemn oath upon his ascension to the throne not to make war on any Christian for as long as there were Muslims in Iberia. It is unlikely that this oath would have prevented him from responding to a potential Christian threat, should that have come to pass, but from our perspective – and likely his own – it seems exceedingly unlikely that the ramblings of Prince Erramun constituted any kind of threat, let alone a serious one.

    In 1107, Barcelona was yet again under Muslim attack. After seizing Faro earlier that year, King Fernando repeated his strategy of making a detour through Barcelona, managing to surprise the Muslim armies a second time with the exact same strategy, before marching into the Cordoban hinterland. Almost immediately, the Emir offered Fernando the large province of Cuenca in return for peace, leaving the county of Molina isolated as a Muslim enclave. Then began a series of rapid, small-scale conquests that lasted until 1115, the result of which was that both Beja and Cordoba not only saw their territories shrink precariously, but also being split down the middle by Christian holdings, effectively containing the Muslims in small, fractured demi-emirates.

    The First Great Iberian War, 1115 - 1122
    When King Fernando attacked Cordoba again in 1115, he was counting on their armies being locked in the ongoing conflict with France, who had gone to war over the Island of Sardinia. One can assume that a significant portion of them indeed were, and had Cordoba been defending alone, the war would have been over within the year. Instead, the Emir of Beja as well as the Sultans of Mauretania and Tunis rallied to the defence of their embattled brothers of the faith.

    The ensuing war has since been known as the First Great Iberian War, and raged for seven years, playing host to some of the largest and bloodiest battles ever fought on Iberian soil. Outnumbered, King Fernando found himself relying again on the healthy treasury of Leon and his reputation as a defender of Christendom, enlisting in turn both The Knights of Saint John and the Knights Templar to fight alongside his armies. The contributions of these holy orders and their numerous soldiers is held to have been absolutely critical in ensuring Christian victory, and their Iberian campaign is often thought to be the starting point of their rise to infamy, catapulting them to fame within just a few years.

    At the end of the war, the dead numbered in the tens of thousands. Peace was finally achieved in 1122, when the Emir of Cordoba, his entire empire near buckling under the pressure of the lengthy war, ceded the Duchy of Valencia, essentially the entire, non-Barceloniuan eastern seaboard of Iberia, to Leon.
    In the wake of this war, a brief negotiation with a severely weakened Aragon lead to Fernando being crowned King of what remained their, essentially absorbing the tiny kingdom.


    Borders of Leon 1122

    Outside of Iberia, however, greater things were afoot. In 1224, Pope Sisinnius II called The Second Crusade, this time with a much more ambitious goal: The Holy City of Jerusalem itself. Fernando, however, faced internal matters that required his immediate attention.

    The Civil wars of Prince Galindo and Duke Sebastiaen, 1127 - 1331
    After the First Great War, King Fernando instituted the law of primogeniture. Presumably this was intended to be a safeguard against the kind of fracturing the once-united northern Kingdom had experienced upon the death of Fernando's grandfather. Primogeniture, for obvious reasons, is significantly less popular with the younger sons than the eldest – particularly Prince Galindo, Fernando's second son, was galled by the change. Parts of the nobility sought to take advantage of the icy relations between father and son to further their own positions, and are thought to have egged the otherwise level-headed Galindo into instigating a civil war. Knowing he would be outnumbered in the field, Galindo sought to minimize any advantage King Fernando would have., including his alliance with the French. The more powerful Duke Sebastiaen of Flanders was unhappy with French rule, and was easily convinced by Prince Galindo to join him in a simultaneous rebellion. Ostensibly, their common goal were to unseat their respective monarchs. The Duke of Flanders, however, is thought to have been more concerned with independence than actually deposing anyone, as the vassal status of Flanders within France would continue to be a point of contention for generations to come.

    When the wars began in earnest, it quickly became apparent that while the Duke of Flanders may have had a realistic chance of defending his claim to independence before the involvement of Leon, Prince Galindo had overestimated his own forces – or perhaps underestimated precisely how much the might of Leon had grown during his father's reign – and found himself vastly outmatched. As early as 1128, Prince Galindo was essentially defeated. Not wanting to cultivate resentment within the kingdom, King Fernando offered clemency to all of Galindo's men if Galindo surrendered and agreed to be imprisoned until the Duke of Flanders had been dealt with.

    Duke Sebastiaen's early successes against a depleted France – the majority of the French nobility and their army had been Crusading since 1124 – were then summarily undone by King Fernando's armies. The Duke refused to surrender, and through a series of protracted sieges, the war dragged on until 1331, when the Duke Sebastiaen finally threw down his banners in surrender. With their respective thrones secure, successfully ending the rebellion spelled even tighter bonds between the rulers of France and Leon. Ironically, if Galindo had stayed his hand, he would later have inherited the throne. Instead, he died, ill and deprived, during the final years of the civil war, never living to see the Throne pass not to his young nephew.

    The end of an era
    Leon's constant warfare combined with the scions of the Jimenez family's penchant for leading troops themselves, their life expectancies tended to be short. During his reign, King Fernando saw all three of his brothers die either during battle or from wounds sustained during one. This unfortunate tradition is carried on through the next generation: Designated heir and eldest son Prince Fernando dies in 1331 at the age 44, having contracted pneumonia while campaigning in France, while Galindo had died years before in the dungeons. Bereft of sons, Prince Fernando's heir and the King's grandon – Felipe – is named the principal heir.

    The latter years of King Fernando's reign saw further conquests in Iberia, as well as a brief campaign in northern Europa at the behest of a relative. With stability secured inside his realm, in 1133 King Fernando declares in front of a thunderous crowd that Leon will, at last, join the Crusade for Jerusalem. Revanchism and anti-muslim sentiments were still strong inside Leon, and popular support for the Crusade was immense. Gathering what was now supremely the largest army on the Iberian Peninsula, the King prepared to set sail with an immense fleet – only to abruptly fall dead virtually as he was boarding his flagship. The myth of his death is filled with a series of supposed quotations (“Men! It appears you must destroy the Abode of Islam without your King!”, “Death? But I am not yet finished!” and so on) While the veracity of these is at best contested, they remain a testament to how well regarded King Fernando the Great was, both in his own time and ours. Today, his likeness can be found all across Greater Iberia in the form of statues.

    With Fernando dead, the Throne of Leon passed to his grandson Felipe.


    Pictured: Felipe, thought to be shortly after his ascension


    The realm inherited by Felipe in 1134

    In summation
    The long reign of Fernando II allowed for a great deal of stability within the realm, despite the civil war. In the larger scheme of things, however, the civil war did very little to change the direction of Iberia or Leon, even when the royal succession essentially skipped an entire generation. The erosion of Muslim power continued in Iberia, while the strong support for the Second Crusade saw even the eastern Muslim powers forced into a defensive posture. As Leon slowly encircled the remaining Muslim powers, Barcelona managed to stay independent through the entirety of Fernando's reign. Aragon, meanwhile, was peacefully absorbed in its entirety by Leon. Navarra, too, remained independent, but would soon have to make concessions to an increasingly aggressive French throne.
    Last edited by Zealuu; 04-05-2012 at 20:34.
    My CK2 AARs:
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    That...went to 1300s very fast? Or did you typo all of those times and mean 113X?

    Otherwise a very enjoyable start to the AAR, I look forward to seeing what you do with it.
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  4. #4
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    Thanks for pointing that out, it was supposed to say 1134, we're still way off the 1300s even in the game.
    My CK2 AARs:
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  5. #5
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    Chapter 3: The middle years of the 12th century
    The middle years of the 12th century saw the ascension of King Felipe I, later known as “The Blessed”. Both during his reign and by most historical accounts he was considered a great reformer, builder and administrator – but an exceedingly poor commander. As the chapter will show, his personal skills in battle may well have been dubious at best, but his talent for management and overall aggressiveness still allowed him to make substantial territorial gains during his reign.

    King Felipe's Crusades, 1334-1142
    Immediately confirming the suspicions of many vassals, King Felipe went ahead with the Crusade, leading his armies to several spectacular defeats at the hands of Caliph Salim during the brief campaign of 1134. While gifted in the arts of statesmanship and administration, King Felipe is said to have been more or less completely bereft the military acumen of his predecessors. Upon his ascension to the throne, his two late wives – he was now twice a widower – had failed to produce any heirs. In 1135, however, he married the 16-year old Sybille of Asperger, by many thought to have been a significant part of the power behind the throne over the course of Felipe's reign. A purported genius, she was immensely talented in every field – a likely reason why Felipe, who himself held three – soon to be four - Royal Crowns, insisted on marrying the daughter of a virtually unknown German Baron.


    Pictured: Sybille von Asperger, aged 17

    The early years of Felipe's reign thus marked an uncharacteristically peaceful period for Leon, as the armies needed to be restored and restocked after the disaster outside Jerusalem. Simultanously with this restoration of might, the economy and infrastructure of Leon underwent what can only be characterized as a boom, likely attributable to the joint minds of Felipe and Sybille. Alongside a vastly increased amount of traded goods, the inhabitants of Leon saw numerous roads paved, reparations made to old castles and fortifications, and expertly engineered sewage systems making the great cities infinitely more habitable. Furthermore, the great castle of Leon attained much of its current proportions during this period. The greatest domestic project of the era, however, would only commence much later: Work on the University of Villablino finally began as late as in 1157.


    Pictured: Castle of Leon, inner keep – as seen today

    In 1136, pressure from the Pope coerced Felipe to again commit forces to the Crusade. This time, he brought a much smaller contingent – and, knowing his limitations, passed de facto command to men more capable. He remained with the army as an observer, hoping perhaps to learn how to avert future disasters should be required to command again. While besieging Jerusalem itself, a much larger Muslim army fell upon the Iberians, who were again defeated, but not broken. The small Iberian army then spent several years roaming the Levant, destroying scattered Muslim forces and aiding in formidable combined sieges. In 1138, deciding their military had recovered sufficiently, King Felipe raised the remainder of his – now gargantuan – army and sailed yet again for the Near East.

    At the Battle of Ascalon, 12000 Iberians aided by some 1200 additional Christian troops, clashed with a similarly-sized Muslim force. The resulting Christian victory sealed the fate of the Second Crusade. In 1141 the Muslim armies were spent, and the joint siege of King Orthon I of France and King Felipe finally meant Christians controlled the principality of Jerusalem. The fact that Pope Callixtus then gave the French King mandate of the newly founded Kingdom of Jerusalem, was seen as a slight by the nobles of Leon. They were keen to remind any who would listen that without their contribution at Ascalon and during the siege of Jerusalem itself, the Christian armies likely would have lost. Vassal relations between Leon and France cooled considerably following this. The gentle Felipe, however, seemed to hold no such grudge, instead publicly congratulating and praising King Otho I for his successful defence of Christendom.

    Second Great Iberian War 1142 – 1157
    In the aftermath of the Second Crusade, Felipe assumed – for the most part correctly – that the armies of the Iberian Muslims were at an all-time low after having committed to continuation of Muslim rule in Jerusalem, and then losing large numbers of men during the closing months. Furthermore, the Moors in particular were militarily strained due to a long-winded conflict with the Holy Roman Empire over Sardinia.

    In 1142, Felipe launched a lightning invasion, rapidly securing the entirety of Sevilla, leaving Beja Mauretania and Cordoba isolated from one another. Ending moorish control of the Strait of Gibraltar was also a priority, and the northern part of the Strait was secured shortly after, extending the reach of the eastern provinces.



    Approximate de facto borders during the early years of the war, 1142-43

    In 1143, Felipe knowingly escalates the war, invading what remains of The Cordoban Emirate. As with the previous Great Iberian War, the surrounding Muslim powers – Beja, Mauretania, Mallorca and Tunis – all rush to preserve Cordoba. This time, however, it is safe to assume that the Leonnese monarch had counted on their involvement. Posting armies both on the eastern seaboard, and the newly conquered Strait of Gibraltar, Felipe was able to deny the majority of the Moorish as well as the entire Mallorcan and Tunisian armies the ease of access they were used to. In the previous war, they had used this to combine their forces – now, they were unable to rendezvous with the embattled Bejan and Cordobans. Instead of facing a combined, enormous Muslim army, the always slightly larger Iberian armies systematically trapped, engaged and destroyed Muslim forces, both in Iberia proper and as they attempted to land on the beaches.

    By 1148, the Emirate of Cordoba for all purposes ceases to exist, as the last of its strongholds are beset by Christians, and the Emir and his remaining subjects flee westward. This had something of a floodgate-effect on the Muslim rulers still in the field. The Mallorcan Emir ceded half his lands – the entire Island of Mallorca, leaving him only with Menorca – in return for peace the same year, while the armies of Tunis simply pulled out and left the Moors and Beja, now vastly outnumbered, to their own devices.



    The approximate borders of Leon during 1148

    The result, perhaps, was a predictable one: After a protracted period that saw few battles but many lengthy sieges, Mauretania brokered a peace in 1154, where they were forced to leave Iberia behind entirely. While the Moors would continue to exert a certain influence over Iberia by virtue of their strong, North-African position, this marked the end of Moorish territory in Iberia. Finally, in 1157 the war ended as the Beja emirate surrendered on extremely unfavourable terms. Their military utterly broken, they were left with no choice but to accept being split into merely two severely isolated Sheikdoms.


    Final borders of Leon at the end of the war, 1157

    The end of Muslim Iberia, 1157 – 1173
    With Muslim rule all but ended in Iberia, it is surprising that Felipe's reputation as a “El Rey Tierno” - “The Gentle King” – builder and administrator first, warrior second if at all – continued to live on. It is arguable that his successes in war came about chiefly as a result of the foundations laid by his father and grandfather. The economic and military power of Leon was at an all-time high by the time Felipe ascended the throne 1133. However, after emerging victorious from a major a war lasting for a total of 15 years, resulting in some of the most significant territorial gains yet for Leon, the great myth of King Felipe's supposed lack of military talent must be seen as precisely that: A myth. Despite his brilliant outmanoeuvring of Tunis and Mauretania during the war, his disastrous first Crusade seems to forever have seale his reputation as a middling commander – and by extension, not a “true” warrior King. A middling commander he may well have been, but his talent for strategy was decidedly not wasted in the large-scale conflicts of the Second Great War, despite his rarely taking the field himself. Precisely how much of the overarching strategy that can be attributed to his Queen, remains near unanswerable – she is not known to have kept a journal, preferring instead to memorize anything of note.

    After the Second Great War, Leon again underwent a period of peace and growing prosperity, and it is assumed that it is during this time King Felipe began to concern himself with the matter of his succession. It were not only in mind and spirit that Felipe and Sybille had found another one – over the course of their marriage, they produced no fewer than eight children, five of which were male. Wanting to avoid a disruptive succession war, it is assumed that Felipe – under advisement from his wife – took several measures to ascertain the succession of his choice.

    By the 1170s, Leon still practised free investiture. To remove them from the line of succession, Felipe proceeded to install two of his younger sons as bishops in the bishoprics of the newly conquered western reaches. His eldest – and possibly least capable – son died at the age of 27, shortly followed by his infant sons, leaving two possible heirs: The martially capable Felipe, and the scholarly Álvar. To ensure that neither could easily usurp the other, Felipe carefully apportioned power within the realm when dividing newly conquered lands, seeking to maintain an even balance amongst the internal powers. Felipe remained the appointed heir and established intimate ties with the army, with Álvar was intended for an administrative role. A struggle was perhaps inevitable, but would not become political reality for years yet – the rule under Felipe I remained stable, even as he tightened control with his vassals' individual freedoms.

    A brief French incursion resulted in half of Navarra being ceded to France, rendering the actual Kingdom of Navarra little more than a glorified principality.

    In 1173 the definitive end of Muslim rule in Iberia arrives, as the two remaining Beja sheikdoms seemingly accept the inevitable, and are absorbed into Leon after only minor military posturing from Leon. With the Muslims gone from Iberia, the Pope himself – despite being displeased with the state of Investiture across Leon – graced King Felipe with a visit, personally blessing him for his service to the Cross, earning him his most common epithet: “The Blessed”.



    Iberia, as it stood after the annexations of 1173


    The internal power blocs of united Leon, approximately 1173

    In summation
    King Felipe I's continuing reputation as a “gentle” king is almost certainly undeserved, given his decidedly ungentle approach to the Muslim presence in Iberia, and his Crusading fervour. Yet he remains in the eyes of many a King whose foremost work was the robust internal reforms and projects, which formed a remarkably solid economic foundation, allowing Leon to prosper rapidly. His work completed that of his father and grandfather, and meant that Iberia approached the end of the 12th century wholly united, as a major European power, every part the rival of – amongst others – France.
    Last edited by Zealuu; 05-05-2012 at 01:26.
    My CK2 AARs:
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    Leon: A Treatise on the Medieval History of Iberia (Historybook)

  6. #6
    I very much enjoyed both the style of this AAR and its content.


    Nice work.

  7. #7
    Major Lafayette53's Avatar
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    This is a pretty awesome AAR

  8. #8
    First Lieutenant Zealuu's Avatar
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    Thanks for the feedback, guys. Glad you like it!

    I need to play the game a little more before I can publish chapter four, but we're getting there.
    My CK2 AARs:
    Bergenhus: A Song of Mostly Ice (Narrative, not AGoT-based - Character writer of the week 23/7-12)
    Leon: A Treatise on the Medieval History of Iberia (Historybook)

  9. #9
    Lady of the North Star Demi Moderator Saithis's Avatar
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    Well done, the peninsula is nearly united. Felipe's reputation may belie the truth, but either way he's kicked the muslims out of Iberia well ahead of schedule and there's plenty of time left for the Greater Spanish Kingdom to do whatever it damn well pleases - and I doubt many of her opponents will be able to get in the way of that.
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  10. #10
    First Lieutenant Zealuu's Avatar
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    It looks like I might have to put this on hiatus until the next patch, because every time the save game reaches the date June 21 1189, I get a CTD. I've even tried to start as another character from that save to see if I could pass the magical date, but, eh, no cigar.

    They know about the issue, so I guess I just have to wait for the next patch. I bought the game on Steam, so I can't just roll back to 1.05d: http://forum.paradoxplaza.com/forum/...1#post13784917

    Now I just have to hope it doesn't mess up my other AAR too. ;_;
    Last edited by Zealuu; 08-05-2012 at 15:31.
    My CK2 AARs:
    Bergenhus: A Song of Mostly Ice (Narrative, not AGoT-based - Character writer of the week 23/7-12)
    Leon: A Treatise on the Medieval History of Iberia (Historybook)

  11. #11
    Recruit AncalagonBlack's Avatar
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    Duchies...not...right *twitch*

  12. #12
    This does seem a lot like a textbook, I like it. Damn well written, subscribed.

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