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TheHyphenated1

Weltkriegschaftler
Mar 1, 2008
1.151
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Ironhewer - Thank you! And thank you for your continued and consistent encouragement! We shall very soon see more about the French effort to isolate the Manuron particle :p .

KLorberau - Painted your own Papa has done it! banner, have you ;) ? Congratulations on the 26 years, by the way.

stnylan - Yes he is. As Ironhewer hopes, though, the bandwagon has a faulty axle and failed brakes.

Slaughts - Thank you very much! I'm glad to have you as a reader (and the first new commentAAR in some time :) ). As to research, I take it you mean technological research? On that front, nothing new yet as only a few months have elapsed, but general research is focusing on modernization of the Heer.
 

TheHyphenated1

Weltkriegschaftler
Mar 1, 2008
1.151
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Chapter II: Part XXI

Chapter II: The Gambit of the West

Part XXI


April 17, 1936

Balancing a mountainous stack of folders in his hands, the young corporal only saw Field Marshal von Blomberg when it was too late. The two collided as the former War Minister rounded a corner, sending both men sprawling onto the marble floor.

“I am greatly sorry, Herr --” the corporal’s eyes widened as he saw the crossed batons on von Blomberg’s shoulder boards, “Herr Generalfeldmarschall.” He struggled to his feet amidst a pile of papers, and seemed to hesitate for a moment. He first saluted, then offered a hand to help the older man to his feet.

“Kurt, Kurt!” von Blomberg’s adjutant, Major Kurt Lemm, opened a door off the hallway and ran over. “Kurt, please assist this corporal in gathering his things.”

“Thank you, Herr Generalfeldmarshall.” The corporal saluted again.

“It was partially my fault as well. Do not be troubled.” von Blomberg stepped over the scattered files and walked quickly toward the door at the end of the long hallway.

Headquarters, Heeresgruppe A (Nord), occupying most of the west wing of the Royal Palace of Brussels, had become a beehive of activity in recent days. HQHGAN, as it was known, formed the nerve center of the army group command -- known in turn as HGr.KdoAN -- which was responsible for the 420,000 men fighting between Bastogne and the Channel.

Having been suspended from his duties as War Minister while under investigation in connection with the Reinickendorf Circle plot, von Blomberg had been transferred to the reserve list indefinitely. When war had broken out, however, Acting War Minister von Küchler had interceded with the Führer on his behalf, leading to his appointment as Commander-in-Chief, HGr.KdoAN. This left von Blomberg, still a Field Marshal, in the odd position of being nominally subordinate to General von Rundstedt, who was the overall commander of Heeresgruppe A, which consisted of both the HGr.KdoAN and the HGr.KdoAB[ayern], under General Liebmann.

Much to the Field Marshal’s relief, von Rundstedt had promptly telephoned him in the hope of averting any personal hard feelings. von Blomberg had assured him that none existed, and that he held out hope for a speedy exoneration. He had not been allowed much time to dwell on his condition, however. With French armies pressing the attack in the north, he had been thoroughly absorbed with the prosecution of the campaign.

He had been the first to authorize Hausser’s drive to Paris, and was now working to ensure that II Armeekorps was not trapped and destroyed there.

To that end, he had been hurrying to a noon meeting to decide on a course of action -- when he had collided with the unfortunate corporal in the hallway. Now, the over-private at the door saluted and opened it for von Blomberg.

He entered the royal dining room-turned conference hall to find three of the other four men already seated to one end of a long table -- General von Fritsch, Commander-in-Chief of OKH; General von Rundstedt, overall Commander-in-Chief of Heeresgruppe A; General Göring, Commander-in-Chief of the Luftwaffe.

The men exchanged brief greetings, and von Blomberg took a seat.

“Should we wait?” Göring tapped his pen against the table impatiently.

He was met by three affirmatives. And so, the generals waited, mostly in silence. After several minutes, von Blomberg caught the sounds of bounding footfalls in the hallway, the over-private’s boots clicking as he snapped to attention, labored breathing, and at last the creaking of the opening door.

Acting Generalmajor Bayerlein hurried into the room, his face shining with sweat. He nodded apologies and set his briefcase down between von Fritsch and Göring. Though technically quite junior to the other four, Bayerlein wielded tremendous influence as de facto Chief of the Grand General Staff -- a position which General von Amsberg had carried out ineffectually at best.

“Firstly, and on a personal note,” von Fritsch said, when Bayerlein was seated, “I visited Generalleutnant von Weichs in the hospital on my way from Berlin. He is awake and doing considerably better.” After his injury defending the Paris supply corridor, von Weichs had undergone surgery in Brussels, and was reportedly recovering well and in stable condition.

The generals voiced expressions of relief.

“Secondly,” the OKH chief continued, “Acting Field Marshal von Küchler has delegated to me full responsibility for the War Ministry’s decision here, for reasons of expediency. What we decide will go directly to the Führer, and thence immediately to Hausser and any other relevant commands. Understood, gentlemen?”

They nodded.

“My position,” von Blomberg started, “is that Hausser should stay exactly where he is.”

von Fritsch frowned. “He is vulnerable there. I believe Hausser should withdraw from the city center, taking up better positions north of Paris.”

“If he withdraws at all,” von Rundstedt countered, “it must be back to VI Armeekorps.”

“I do not see why,” von Fritsch said, “Hausser should lose all his hard-won ground when he can be relieved.”

“How soon can relief reach the city?” von Rundstedt glanced about the table.

von Blomberg caught the general’s attention. “Forward detachments of VI Armeekorps can reach Paris by tomorrow night.”

von Rundstedt shook his head. “That will be too late. 1. Panzer cannot keep the corridor open past tonight.” Nehring’s 1. Panzer-Division had been locked in heavy fighting for more than twenty-four hours, successfully repelling five French divisions that had been attacking piecemeal along the length of Hausser’s Paris-Cambrai supply line. At its narrowest near Jussy, the corridor had been pinched to a mere 3000 meters wide.

It was a fair point. Still, von Blomberg reckoned, the collapse of the corridor did not necessarily equate to disaster. “How long could Hausser hold out in a siege?”

“Effectively, he could not hold out at all,” Bayerlein said. “The city is not very defensible, and II Armeekorps is so low on fuel that even in a defensive battle would exhaust its reserves very quickly. The same is true of ammunition and rations. And, with French armies fighting into Paris, the city’s police would certainly rise up.”

Göring was listening with uncharacteristic interest. “What of the city’s art treasures? Can those not be used as bargaining chips?”

“Think now, General,” von Rundstedt chided. “Such a move would destroy the sympathy the world holds for Germany.”

“Can anything of greatest value at least be removed to Germany by the retreating soldiers?”

“I would advise against it, General.”

The Luftwaffe chief glowered. “We’re in a bad position, then, aren’t we?”

“I should like to think not,” von Rundstedt said. “In speaking of that I am reminded -- what can the Luftwaffe do to help the situation?”

“I can’t say with certainty. We have badly mauled the Royal Air Force over Belgium and the Rhineland in the past five days, but my planes are stretched to the limit in a defensive capacity -- which is as the Füher has dictated. With Hausser’s corridor coming under air attack from the French, we will be hard-pressed to protect him. Right now, I can make no guarantees.”

von Rundstedt scowled but did not pursue the matter further.

“What is Hausser’s numerical strength right now?” Bayerlein was quickly scribbling notes that stretched over several untidy pages.

von Rundstedt glanced over his papers. “Officially, II Armeekorps entered France with 53,654 men.”

Bayerlein thanked him. “So we have three armored divisions to eleven known French divisions in Picardie and Île de France.”

“What does that equal in numbers of men?” asked Göring.

“We do not know for certain, but the General Staff estimates somewhere between 100,000 and 200,000 men, depending on the fighting strength of each division. From what Abwehr reports I have seen, I think closer to the greater figure.”

“So four to one. According one of the papers you gave us, Nehring fought off greater odds than that. I think considering Hausser’s genius he can do the same or better.”

“Perhaps,” said Bayerlein, “but the numbers do not tell the whole story. The French tanks -- which are only now coming to bear -- are much heavier than our own, and as such Nehring’s men have great difficulty stopping their attacks on the corridor.”

“How many armored vehicles have we lost?”

“I do not have that number, General Göring, but Hausser reports that he only has two thirds of his fighting strength remaining. Thus, roughly four hundred armored vehicles of one kind or another have been incapacitated by either fuel shortage, breakdown or enemy action.”

“I see. How many French tanks did our own vehicles destroy in return for their losses?”

Bayerlein replied perhaps louder than he intended. “Probably none! The Panzer Is are only intended to combat infantry. We must use anti-tank guns to disable all but the lightest of the French tanks.”

Checking his watch, von Fritsch rapped the table with his knuckles. “So we agree that things are difficult for II Armeekorps. What we are here for, however, is to decide whether to pull out of Paris. And, if the decision is to be made, it must be made now, while Hausser still has time to organize an orderly withdrawal if that is our decision.”

There was silence.

“Gentlemen?”

von Blomberg sighed. “What does Hausser now wish to do?”

Bayerlein answered. “As of eleven, he wishes to hold in Paris. Without air support or artillery, which Lebrun says the French will not use, they would be forced to fight for the city street by street, which they would also be unwilling to do. They would then be left with the option of siege, as the Field Marshal asked about. On that point, Hausser thinks he can hold Paris until relieved. Nonetheless, it is only we that have the full picture of the campaign, and I do not believe the decision should be made based on any single man’s personal wishes.”

“Agreed,” said von Fritsch. “After hearing everything, I support pulling II Armeekorps back to VI Armeekorps’ positions at once, allowing for the recapture of Paris by a larger force soon.”

“My thoughts exactly,” Bayerlein said, nodding. “General von Rundstedt?”

“What I fear,” von Rundstedt said, “is that if we are forced out of Paris once we shall not be able to return. Nonetheless, I support a withdrawal.”

“Very well! There is a majority.” Göring began to slide his chair backward, but von Fritsch stopped him with a look.

“Field Marshal?”

von Blomberg pondered. “Though I support the opinion of Generalleutnant Hausser, and have personal reservations about losing the ground he has gained, I consent to withdrawal. Nonetheless, I shall order VI Armeekorps to proceed forward with even greater speed.”

“It is decided, then.” von Fritsch straightened his papers. “I shall cable the Führer immediately for approval.”

“Very well,” Bayerlein said, “but take care not to mention Hausser’s personal opinion. I am sure that he would insist on doing whatever his conqueror thinks.”

The OKH chief nodded, and departed from the room after instructing the others to remain where they were.

He returned fifteen minutes later. “The Führer accepted the withdrawal with reluctance. Hausser is to abandon Paris.”

von Blomberg and the others waited for Hausser’s confirmation, which was received at 1250 hours.

Afterward, he remained in the building, attending to paperwork in the office that had been set up for him, while waiting for word on the withdrawal. By late afternoon, radio reports reached HQHGAN that Général de division Pierre-Georges Arlabosse had entered central Paris. General Gamelin arrived in the city just before nightfall. Albert Lebrun was to come on the air next, but von Blomberg turned the radio off and quietly returned to his hotel.
 
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Kurt_Steiner

Katalaanse Burger en Terroriste
Feb 12, 2005
20.045
638
Well... tha problem with the Panzers begins to be annoying... We needed heavier tanks at once... if possible.

About Paris... don't worry. We'll return, and it will be for staying there forever. :D
 

Ironhewer

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Ah, good ole' Goering, over 50,000 men are about to surrounded and cut off, the French are driving towards Munich, Germany's Panzers are outmatched and all he can think of is looting the Louvre.

Viv la France!

A most excellent update.
 

stnylan

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I also thought this captured Goering quite well.

I can't help but think they are possibly making a mistake. Capturing Paris was a great coup. Losing it though wipes away most of the advantage from that bold stroke.
 

unmerged(46967)

American Fascist
Jul 31, 2005
572
0
That certainly does sound like Goering, knowing how much he fancied the art treasures of other countries IRL.

As far as Paris is concerned, I see the military situation outweighing the strategic one. If Hausser was told to stay, I can see it becoming another Stalingrad early in the game and since the force is indeed smaller than Paulus's Sixth Army, I don't think Hausser could've held much longer. That would've been a worse situation as far as propaganda is concerned.
 

unmerged(61356)

General
Sep 30, 2006
2.431
0
I have finally gotten myself caught up with your excellent story. The characters are well written as well as intriguing, and the narrative is excellent. My praise for all aspects of this AAR could go on, but I'll sum it up this way: Best AAR on the forum in my opinion.

As for the last update: I'm surprised that Hitler agreed to the retreat. An uncharacteristic move on his part. Germany could go far if Hitler continues to approach the war from a rational perspective.
 

diziziz

Second Lieutenant
Jan 28, 2008
157
0
In response to Part XX, I wonder how the Italian troops will react when they find out that Mussolini simply copied the entire speech from Hitler.
 

TheHyphenated1

Weltkriegschaftler
Mar 1, 2008
1.151
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Kurt_Steiner - Better panzers are currently in design. They cannot arrive soon enough!

Ironhewer - Thank you! Goering certainly gets on the nerves of the old officer corps with remarks like that.

stnylan - Thank you! There is definitely a strong argument in that direction, as was voiced by von Rundstedt and von Blomberg in the meeting. Nonetheless, they felt the risk of losing the entire Panzerwaffe to be too great.

Slaughts - Well put. In addition, Hausser's II Armeekorps is proportionally much more important to the Wehrmacht than the Sixth Army in 1942-3.

Hardraade - Aha! Thank you one hundred times over. Given the crowded field, I'm truly honored at the distinction, sir! As to Hitler's acquiescence, that is based on his lack of quack intervention, his elation over the triumph of the day before, and a very creative cable by von Fritsch, as we shall see ;) .

diziziz - Given what historical precedent there is, I'd say probably not too badly ;) .
 

unmerged(61356)

General
Sep 30, 2006
2.431
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TheHyphenated1 said:
Hardraade - Aha! Thank you one hundred times over. Given the crowded field, I'm truly honored at the distinction, sir! As to Hitler's acquiescence, that is based on his lack of quack intervention, his elation over the triumph of the day before, and a very creative cable by von Fritsch, as we shall see ;) .

When I read of the death of Dr. Morell in the opening posts, the first thing I thought was that it could only have a positive effect on Hitler's health and mental state. I find myself very curious about that cable now. ;)
 

TheHyphenated1

Weltkriegschaftler
Mar 1, 2008
1.151
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canonizedthehyphenated1.png


I've been canonized -- and I'm not even dead yet!

canonized, author of Timelines: What if Spain Failed to Control the World?, interviewed me on the latest segment of You've Been Canonized.

In our interview, we have a good chat about me, Timelines and Weltkriegschaft (in that order, too). He even convinced me to let slip a few exclusive teasers about Weltkriegschaft, so I encourage you to take a look and see the interview for yourself!​
 

unmerged(94576)

Second Lieutenant
Mar 12, 2008
141
0
Downfall, huh?

Are you hinting at the obvious?
 

TheHyphenated1

Weltkriegschaftler
Mar 1, 2008
1.151
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Hello All,

I unexpectedly had to go out of town, but am now back in action. Parts XXII and XXIII can be expected very soon.

In the meanwhile for those interested, I have a quiz to see how you're keeping track of events so far. The reader with the most correct answers (and who replied first, in case of a tie) wins an honorary Iron Cross 1st Class! See what you can recall from memory. Those who cheat will be turned over to the proper Reich authorities ;) .


1. Johann Mahler serves in the...

a) 33. Infanterie-Division
b) 13. Infanterie-Division
c) 2. Panzer-Division
d) Leibstandarte-SS Adolf Hitler


2. Oberst Kurt Student planned and orchestrated a daring mission to capture...

a) The Maginot Line
b) The Hague
c) Fort Eben-Emael
d) Belgian hearts and minds


3. The Reinickendorf Circle met in the Berlin borough of…

a) Reinickendorf
b) Tiergarten
c) Aldersgate
d) Berchtesgaden


4. Ernst Trommler is an under-editor for the…

a) Daily Telegraph
b) Der Stürmer
c) Times of London
d) Völkischer Beobachter


5. Victor Reinert watched the progress of Operation Chopin from a window of the…

a) Hotel Alexander
b) Hôtel de Crillon
c) Hotel Tallyrand
d) car he was driving


6. Per the terms of the Belgian surrender, King Leopold was exiled to…
a) Albertville
b) Léopoldville
c) St. Helena
d) Corfu


7. Hitler plans to recreate Berlin as Welthauptstadt Germania, which is to be largely designed by…

a) Frank Lloyd Wright
b) Sepp Dietrich
c) Albert Speer
d) Walter Friedmann


8. During the March 17th Heldengedenktag ceremonies, Hitler presented his divisions with…

a) Golden eagles
b) Silver signet rings
c) Golden fasces
d) Artwork looted from Paris


9. Helen Krause’s father heads the…

a) Abwehr
b) Office of the Four Year Plan
c) Schutzstaffel
d) Ölproduktionamt


10. The Abwehr’s most highly-placed spy in France is code-named...

a) Der Grofaz
b) Schweinswal
c) Kummer
d) Adler
 

unmerged(46967)

American Fascist
Jul 31, 2005
572
0
1. C
2. C
3. C
4. B
5. C
6. B
7. C
8. A
9. D
10. D
 

unmerged(94576)

Second Lieutenant
Mar 12, 2008
141
0
1. a
2. c
3. a
4. d
5. a
6. b
7. c
8. a
9. d
10. c
 

TheHyphenated1

Weltkriegschaftler
Mar 1, 2008
1.151
0
Hardraade - Next update has some answers, and is going up now.

SeleucidRex - All hints are to be taken as is. Think though -- would I really give away the ending with something obvious like that?


Quiz Answers:

1. A, 2. C ,3. A, 4. D, 5. C, 6. B, 7. C, 8. A, 9. D, 10. B

Congratulations to SeleucidRex on 8/10! Slaughts did well also. Enjoy the honorary Iron Cross, SeleucidRex :D .


Part XXII going up now.
 
Last edited:

TheHyphenated1

Weltkriegschaftler
Mar 1, 2008
1.151
0
Chapter II: Part XXII

Chapter II: The Gambit of the West

Part XXII


April 22, 1936

“Thank you for the ride, Hauptmann Bauer.”

“Good luck.”

Cristoph Scholl climbed from the sidecar of the captain’s motorcycle. Along with several members of the Führer’s staff, he had come by car from his hotel on the Brienner Strasse. They had found the road to Karlsfeld choked with trucks and SS personnel. Apparently, one of the officers had told them, the Führer’s headquarters was being evacuated. It was six twenty-five in the morning, and Scholl was expected to be at Hitler’s side in just minutes. Overhearing of his plight, the passing Hauptmann Bauer had offered him a ride along the shoulder of the road.

Now, men were swarming about the trucks, loading furniture and equipment that was being passed out of the Engmann St. Louis warehouse basement. Scholl blinked off his sleepiness. He had to find the Führer.

A wail overhead drew all eyes skyward. Several seconds later, a dull thud shook the ground. Loading of the trucks resumed immediately. The city had been sporadically shelled by French long range artillery, and looking southeast toward the city center, Scholl saw several plumes of gray smoke drifting into the overcast sky.

Scholl hurried down the concrete ramp to the basement entrance, squeezing himself past two Luftwaffe staffers walking a heavy desk up towards a waiting truck bed.

As his eyes adjusted to the dim light within, he found the huge room nearly empty. Near the center, the Führer’s immediate staff still worked diligently as the headquarters was being dismantled around them. Scholl presented himself to Standartenführer Junge. “Where is the Führer?”

“Outside, talking to Obergruppenführer Dietrich. The Führer must decide where to go.”

“He is giving up Munich, then?”

“I believe so.”

Scholl swallowed. In the short time that he had come to know Germany’s Führer, he had come to appreciate his almost fanatical love for the German soil. Each square meter lost -- especially ground so dear to him as Munich’s -- wounded him deeply.

The day before, Hitler had had a second outburst when he learned that Augsburg had fallen despite stout resistance in the forests to the west of the city. Fortunately that time, someone had been able to reach Bayerlein, who telephoned the Führer, promising to appear the next day at his headquarters to personally restore the situation.

It would need a great deal of restoration.

HGr.KdoAB, under General Liebmann, was desperately trying to slow the French drive toward Munich.

Though it commanded eighteen divisions of varying combat readiness, most of these were in disarray several days away from the city. Only two divisions of any effectiveness stood in the path of the French advance.

The French advance was led by the 4ème Armée -- comprised of five infantry divisions and one of cavalry.

On April twentieth at Pforzheim, the cavalry had been badly bloodied when it attempted to assault a German infantry battalion without assistance. Even though the battalion had been eventually forced back, more than a thousand horses and men lay dead on the field.

Liebmann had fared more poorly, however, against the French infantry -- which was supported by horse-drawn artillery. The speed of the French advance had left little time for Liebmann’s men to prepare defensive positions, leaving them unable to slow the enemy for more than a few hours at a time.

After the fall of Augsburg, Liebmann had retreated eastward, ordering his men to entrench some 15 kilometers from Karlsfeld in the hope of at last arresting the progress of Blanc’s 4ème Armée. This had brought Munich and its outskirts well into the range of French artillery, which had inflicted enough damage to cause the Führer to apparently consider leaving.

Returning to the outside of the warehouse, Scholl found Hitler standing next to his personal limousine, engaged in conversation with Leibstandarte-SS commander Josef "Sepp" Dietrich. Dietrich was a compact, rough-looking man who commanded the fearful respect of all those under him. He had been a butcher in the old days, Scholl had heard, and dark whispers following the Night of the Long Knives held that he remained one.

“Heil!” Scholl approached when neither man was speaking.

“Cristoph, I am glad to see that you got through.” The Führer squeezed his shoulder. “I have just decided that I shall go to Berchtesgaden. I would have liked to stay in Munich, but if Munich is surrounded, I would no longer be able to lead Germany. Nonetheless, we will remain in the south, and thereby rally the German People to resistance.”

“Yes, Mein Führer.”

“You may travel in my car, as I may have need of you.”

Scholl soon found himself in the back of the Mercedes-Benz 770, along with Dietrich and their Führer. From the car, they could hear a large artillery barrage pound the German positions west of Munich -- and die down several minutes later.

Standartenführer Junge was at the window. “Mein Führer, the convoy is ready to depart. The observers report that it is safe to go now, as the barrage has ended.”

“Thank you. I shall see you in Berchtesgaden.”

Junge saluted, and the limousine began to roll toward its place in the convoy.

Scholl settled into the comfortable black leather seat. The Führer had been the happiest he had ever seen him the day he received news of Hausser’s drive to Paris. He had anguished over the prospect of Hausser leaving it the very next day, but had declared himself willing to trust Hausser’s own judgment. So much had happened in so little time.

Reaching into his trouser pocket, Scholl felt the folded telegram still there from days before. He pulled it out and reread it, imagining Hitler’s first surprised reading of it on the seventeenth.



Secret
1230 April 17, 1936

Mein Führer,

The commanders met today at Headquarters, Heeresgruppe A (North) to decide upon a course of action for II Armeekorps. At least 11 divisions, some of them armored, are threatening to cut off GLT Hausser’s 3 divisions in Paris. The French tanks are far heavier than our own, and can only be defeated by artillery, armor and infantry working together. It is impossible for VI Armeekorps to reach Paris before II Armeekorps risks annihilation. Because the loss of nearly the entire Panzerwaffe would devastate the war effort, this must be averted at all costs. Upon asking the opinion of GLT Hausser, he suggested that II Armeekorps move to join VI Armeekorps so that the combined force can decisively destroy the enemy army and advance with overwhelming force. The commanders were initially hesitant, but Hausser’s clear strategic analysis and excellent understanding of his own situation convinced us the support this proposed maneuver. Please cable back with your approval immediately, so as to allow GLT Hausser time to execute his operation before nightfall.

v. Fritsch




As the convoy made its way into the heart of Munich, it came to a stop along the Brienner Strasse. Hitler and Dietrich slipped out of the limousine and down the sidewalk, surrounded by soldiers from the trucks. Scholl shifted in his seat to see them out his window. They were at the so-called Brown House, the headquarters of the Nazi Party. Scholl had seen the brown brick edifice many times in photographs, and passed it on the street every day when he left his hotel, but had never been inside. Now, he saw the Führer at the entrance, speaking to a man in Party uniform whom he did not recognize. The doors of the Brown House were opened, and four SS men carried out a long wooden crate. Scholl could see Hitler give the men instructions -- he seemed to Scholl to be cautioning them to be careful with the crate -- as they loaded it onto the bed of the truck in front of the limousine.

Original_Braunes_Haus2.jpg

The Brown House was the longtime headquarters of the Nazi Party.


With Dietrich, Hitler and the crate back in their respective vehicles, the convoy started up again, winding through the city toward the Autobahn towards Berchtesgaden. The historic buildings of Munich’s famed city center had faded into apartment buildings and tree-lined neighborhoods when the convoy again lurched to a stop.

thumb.gif

Adolf Hitler’s convoy making its way out of Munich.


Scholl heard the roar of a motorcycle engine, and Hauptmann Bauer pulled up alongside the limousine. In the sidecar was Fritz Bayerlein.

Hitler’s Favorite climbed from the sidecar, thanking the captain just as Scholl had himself earlier, and appeared at the Führer’s window. “I am here as promised, Mein Führer.”

Visibly animated by the Acting Generalmajor’s presence, Hitler greeted Bayerlein warmly and invited him into the limousine. Taking his seat, Bayerlein spoke frankly and directly.

“I hear that you are leaving for the Berghof, and I am troubled by this, Führer. You have summoned me to turn around the situation in Bavaria, and I tell you that you must remain with the commanders of the Heer in the north.”

“I do not think I can do that, Bayerlein.”

“I must insist that you go north, away from the path of Blanc’s army.” His tone was calm, but only a handful of men in the Reich would dare speak to the Führer so.

“Such a thing would be seen as abandonment of the Bavarians. I must help them resist.” Hitler looked to Dietrich, who was sitting across from him, for encouragement, but Bayerlein pressed on.

“If you are trapped in the south, Mein Führer, the war will be lost. Come north with me to Army Group Headquarters at Regensburg, and from there we can prepare to retake Munich and Bavaria.”

“How could they countenance such a betrayal? How could I…”

“Mein Führer, I myself am a Bavarian. I love this land as much as you do, but I would sooner lose it for a month to retake it permanently, than to hold it for a month to lose it permanently.”

“My Bayerlein, what shall we do to retake it?”

“At my urging, General von Rundstedt has ordered Generalleutnant Hausser from the north to our defense.” At this, Scholl felt the convoy begin to move again.

“Hausser?” The Führer’s eyes brightened.

Sensing an opportunity to sway him, Bayerlein drew a paper map from his breast pocket and recounted the situation in the north for Hitler, Scholl and Dietrich.

He explained that Hausser’s regrouped II Armeekorps had moved eastward, taking Sedan that morning -- thereby trapping four French divisions in eastern Belgium.

von Blomberg’s forces -- VI Armeekorps and its constituent XI Armeekorps -- now controlled a relatively stable front running from the Channel at Fécamp to the borders of Luxembourg. The French pocket around Calais had been evacuated just before VI Armeekorps blocked its retreat, but the evacuated units would be in no position to fight for some time. This left the 7ème Armée blocking von Blomberg’s drive along the coast, the 9ème Armée opposite his center, and a number of reserve divisions congealing along his left.

As Bayerlein spoke, the Knight’s Cross hanging from his neck tinkled softly as the 770 alternately braked and accelerated with the rest of the convoy. Scholl felt himself drifting off to sleep. He fancied he heard Hitler say, “Regensburg it is.” Soon, he felt the convoy slow and turn to the north, then sleep finally took him.
 
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unmerged(46967)

American Fascist
Jul 31, 2005
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I'm guessing whats inside the crate is the infamous Blood Banner from their early Beer Hall Putsch.
 

Kurt_Steiner

Katalaanse Burger en Terroriste
Feb 12, 2005
20.045
638
I think so... it's the flag.

Advancing so deep in Germany the French are risking themselves to be trapped into a nice Kessel...
 

stnylan

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So they have managed to persuade Hitler to follow some common sense.