Unsure what some buildings represent...

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Calanon

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May 31, 2013
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Now economic and infrastructure history is not my strong suit and some of this may be me being dumb but I am confused at exactly what some buildings represent in EU4. Obviously there is a level of abstraction - of course a Christian province is going to have a great many churches but some I am just not sure about.

Speaking of churches and other temples - why is it the temple building that gives tax increase? Yes the Church historically had a tithe but this was for Church revenue rather than to a country's government.

Impressment offices - yes the British Royal Navy utilised impressment to recruit sailors to crew her ships but did the press gangs actually operate out of offices? And as far as I understand impressment was mostly a British thing. Is literally just representing that? Could it be renamed to fit other countries better?

Soldier's households - what is the difference between this and a barracks?

State house - as far as I'm aware a state house in real life is the primary building for a head of state, but you can have many in EU4. This is what I am most confused about.

Furnace - why is a furnace the building for coal? Surely to increase goods produced it would be a coal mine?

Mill - I am unsure why mills are the building for gemstones, Chinaware and glassware.

Trade station - how come cloves, spices and possibly incence are associated with this rather than plantations?
 
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Trade station - how come cloves, spices and possibly incence are associated with this rather than plantations?

Game balance. Plantations and Trade Stations are already tied for the most applicable trade goods with 6 each. By moving those three trade goods to Plantations they would eclipse every other manufactory by a significant degree in terms of sheer applicability.

Mill - I am unsure why mills are the building for gemstones, Chinaware and glassware.


Now techically milling only arose at the very end of Eu4s timeframe, but then again the best way to produce the energy to produce the spinning needed to produce stuff in bulk was to use a watermill.
 
Furnace - why is a furnace the building for coal? Surely to increase goods produced it would be a coal mine?
The furnace doesn't increase the goods produced of the coal province like the other manufactories. Instead it gives +5% goods produced in all your provinces. I think it is meant to represent the industrial revolution and its effects on the whole economy. Just producing more coal in a coal mine would not have this effect if you don't use the coal in industrial processes.
 
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My guess is that the church tax thing represents stuff such as the church keeping records of births and such, so with more information about population, it's easier to tax people. Also, educated clergymen being able to work in the beauracracy.
 
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Now economic and infrastructure history is not my strong suit and some of this may be me being dumb but I am confused at exactly what some buildings represent in EU4. Obviously there is a level of abstraction - of course a Christian province is going to have a great many churches but some I am just not sure about.

Speaking of churches and other temples - why is it the temple building that gives tax increase? Yes the Church historically had a tithe but this was for Church revenue rather than to a country's government.
Because religion is tied to adm which is the tax dev
Impressment offices - yes the British Royal Navy utilised impressment to recruit sailors to crew her ships but did the press gangs actually operate out of offices? And as far as I understand impressment was mostly a British thing. Is literally just representing that? Could it be renamed to fit other countries better?
Impressment is emergency, this is routine. What other names could be suitable?
Soldier's households - what is the difference between this and a barracks?
Billeting vs keeping them in barracks
State house - as far as I'm aware a state house in real life is the primary building for a head of state, but you can have many in EU4. This is what I am most confused about.
the seat of local governance for the region
Furnace - why is a furnace the building for coal? Surely to increase goods produced it would be a coal mine?
because you burn coal in a furnace, with the heat of the furnance letting you produce other products faster
Mill - I am unsure why mills are the building for gemstones, Chinaware and glassware.
you mill gemstones, chinaware is pottery so mill could be grounding the clay up
Trade station - how come cloves, spices and possibly incence are associated with this rather than plantations?
Because not all are grown on plantations but instead harvested and then stored in depots
 
Because religion is tied to adm which is the tax dev
I don't think that really explains what it "represents", though.
because you burn coal in a furnace, with the heat of the furnance letting you produce other products faster
I'm not disagreeing with you, but I love the mental image of a heating system causing the sudden multiplication of cows.
 
I'm not disagreeing with you, but I love the mental image of a heating system causing the sudden multiplication of cows
It's not that hard to imagine though. You don't need a steampunk fantasy of mechanized slaughterhouses, but rising industrial productivity can drive up wages which increases spending power, which increases demand which increases the need for cow multiplication, and we're suddenly in Vicky 3 territory :D
 
The furnace doesn't increase the goods produced of the coal province like the other manufactories. Instead it gives +5% goods produced in all your provinces. I think it is meant to represent the industrial revolution and its effects on the whole economy. Just producing more coal in a coal mine would not have this effect if you don't use the coal in industrial processes.
4,000+ hours and becoming an Economical Hegemon in almost every run, but that's something new to me!
 
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