Things you discovered that weren't obvious

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Jays298

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Mar 21, 2011
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So I think I have three playthroughs on 2.0 and a few on the previous edition.

And I just discovered how "attaching" works for units. Like I saw the button ages ago but only thought it was for AI because it wasn't obvious how it was used. But it seems smart to attach levies to legions...

As well as how having multiples of a trade good increases the bonus? I'm still not even sure if that's the case, like having 5 wines in a provence gives 5x the bonus?

And "control range" I didn't even know this existed much less how this worked. For instance the Punic tree for Rome wants you to kick the Carthage out of Iberia before taking Carthago. But that can't happen without the foresight to take annex ports to extend "control" range.

What have you discovered about how the game works that wasn't obvious or clear to you to begin with?
 
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Governors finesse and loyalty affect the governor policy effort.

Force march is very important in war to avoid battles and take only the ones you want.

Breakthroughs are more important to get inventions than research efficiency, specially if you have penalties on advanced tech.

Smear reputation of characters from one party will improve your support from the other two parties.

National ideas are unlocked by tech level and changing them depending on the circumstances is better than setting up and then forgetting them.

Civilization is very powerful but forgotten modifier, its bonus summarized in the territory small bar. You always want to max it out (unless you are a tribe).

Power base is mainly function of family prestige and prestige is accrued by having jobs. One player can deny power base to all families but one by only using characters from one family for jobs. This is useful for kingdoms as the king and head of the royal family will always be loyal. For other governments, looking at the family prestige and trying to give jobs to characters from families with less prestige will level the power base of all heads of families.

Heads of families have no senate power if they hold a governorship, denying their influence to increase the seats of their party. By giving them a small governorship you can control their loyalty and have a majority of your preferred party.

Some culture have special technologies that change the tech three. By integrating them and using a cultural decision, you can unlock those branches (to confirm in vanilla).

Cultural decisions for integrated cultures allow for special interactions with characters.
 
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You need a specific law to have more than one legion (that’s relatively obvious, depending on where you play).

Religious ideas are interesting - there’s stuff like canons and centralized priesthoods.

You can give land to pirates in an event.
 
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Governors finesse and loyalty affect the governor policy effort.

Force march is very important in war to avoid battles and take only the ones you want.

Breakthroughs are more important to get inventions than research efficiency, specially if you have penalties on advanced tech.

Scorning characters from one party will improve your support from the other two parties.

National ideas are unlocked by tech level and changing them depending on the circumstances is better than setting up and then forgetting them.

Civilization is very powerful but forgotten modifier, its bonus summarized in the territory small bar. You always want to max it out (unless you are a tribe).

Power base is mainly function of family prestige and prestige is accrued by having jobs. One player can deny power base to all families but one by only using characters from one family for jobs. This is useful for kingdoms as the king and head of the royal family will always be loyal. For other governments, looking at the family prestige and trying to give jobs to characters from families with less prestige will level the power base of all heads of families.

Heads of families have no senate power if they hold a governorship, denying their influence to increase the seats of their party. By giving them a small governorship you can control their loyalty and have a majority of your preferred party.

Some culture have special technologies that change the tech three. By integrating them and using a cultural decision, you can unlock those branches (to confirm).

Cultural decisions for integrated cultures allow for special interactions with characters.

Really smart about making a problem character or head of family a governor.

That might also help if you're trying to change the power balance in the Senate maybe, which I've noticed can get skewed over time.
 
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A note about problem characters, to build off what's been said here: an office is an office, whether it's the governorship of all Magna Graecia or the single territory colonized out in the Dacian / Pannonian lands. This means if you need to fill your quota for Great Family offices, and all you have are corrupt/disloyal/bad trait/low stat members left, shunting them off to those provinces and using your best, most loyal characters for the powerful governorships will keep the families happy while not actually giving them appreciable power. Plus, if their bad governorship leads to a revolt, it's not like those provinces will be much of a challenge.
 
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A note about problem characters, to build off what's been said here: an office is an office, whether it's the governorship of all Magna Graecia or the single territory colonized out in the Dacian / Pannonian lands. This means if you need to fill your quota for Great Family offices, and all you have are corrupt/disloyal/bad trait/low stat members left, shunting them off to those provinces and using your best, most loyal characters for the powerful governorships will keep the families happy while not actually giving them appreciable power. Plus, if their bad governorship leads to a revolt, it's not like those provinces will be much of a challenge.
Admiralship of single Liburne is also an office...
 
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Some culture have special technologies that change the tech three. By integrating them and using a cultural decision, you can unlock those branches (to confirm in vanilla).
Whaaaaaat???
1.700 hours in and still learning something new.

So basically get a Gothic tribe, integrate Punics and Arabians = Profit!!! Super merchant empire.

Nice idea for a next run.
 
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Whaaaaaat???
1.700 hours in and still learning something new.

So basically get a Gothic tribe, integrate Punics and Arabians = Profit!!! Super merchant empire.

Nice idea for a next run.
I have confirmed in vanilla that this is the case, in fact this shows in the wiki.
1691151480621.png


This is also the case in HMO mod where unique inventions have been created by @olivenkranz and @Ukhan2 . Like:

1691151802923.png
1691151811499.png


I am sure that Invictus has created more for other cultures as well.

Happy integrating!
 
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Just learned that Levies map mode allows you to choose what province the levies spawn in. That is really cool.
You can also spawn your levies on top of a barbarian armies to quickly deal with them if they haven't taken control of the territory yet. Otherwise you need to wait until they have moved to a territory that you still control to spawn your levies there.

I have never tried it but I assume that you can do that to enemy armies as well incase you are suddenly attacked by the AI.
 
Barbarians add pops to your settlements when they complete a siege with 1 POP each time that decreases the stack of barbarians 1 cohort (500men) until they disappear.

Allowing barbarians to populate your territories is the best option IMHO as you only lose some civ value temporary after the siege, with no gold stolen or pops killed.

PS: hat tip to @olivenkranz for this one
 
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I would like to add that if you send a fleet to a sea zone then an army can march through that sea zone.
Provided you have enough ships in the fleet.
I first found that when playing as Rome and ordered the wrong army to attack a territory in Corsica.
 
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I would like to add that if you send a fleet to a sea zone then an army can march through that sea zone.
Provided you have enough ships in the fleet.
I first found that when playing as Rome and ordered the wrong army to attack a territory in Corsica.
This thing happen to in EU4 if i remember.
 
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