• Crusader Kings III Available Now!

    The realm rejoices as Paradox Interactive announces the launch of Crusader Kings III, the latest entry in the publisher’s grand strategy role-playing game franchise. Advisors may now jockey for positions of influence and adversaries should save their schemes for another day, because on this day Crusader Kings III can be purchased on Steam, the Paradox Store, and other major online retailers.


    Real Strategy Requires Cunning

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First Lieutenant
Apr 11, 2005
237
0
After reading and enjoying many AARs I finally decided to write one myself. As this is going to be my first AAR I’ll keep it in a simple, semi-narrative log style. Maybe some game events will inspire me to adopt a character driven plot… .

Why Savoy? In my opinion, it is small enough to be challenging, but offers good opportunities (2 state cultures, rich neighbours). Last but not least I like the country and the people and think they should have done better in history.

The setting:

- EU2 1.08 with EEP 1.04
- Difficulty Hard / Aggressiveness Coward
- no reloading, no cheating, no event scripting
- I didn’t read the event file (just my own historical knowledge)

My goals:

- keep France as small as possible
- always maintain good relations with Spain, Burgundy and Austria
- get as much out of the Hundred Years War as possible
- control Italy at the end of the game

I hope it’s going to be a story worth reading… .
 

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First Lieutenant
Apr 11, 2005
237
0
Part I

Part I


th_180_savoyHelm.jpg
pomp helmet of the first Duke of Savoy​


It is the year 1419 anno domini. Amedee VIII is the first to bear the title Duke of Savoy, ruling over a small but wealthy state in a corner of central Europe. The Hundred Years War is raging in France. Death, destruction and opportunities are everywhere.

To ensure the safety of the Savoien lands has always been the primary goal of wise Duke Amedee. As there is nothing stronger and safer as the bounds of blood, we established royal ties to our good neighbours of Burgundy in early March. Unfortunately, they fought together with England and some northern allies against France and its vassals. We felt compelled to honour our familiar responsibility and joined arms with Burgundy and England in June, sending our troops to the French Dauphinee soon thereafter. The siege of Grenoble was a hard one and lasted almost one year, but on the 4th of July 1420 the city fell, and we controlled the whole province.
In the meantime, mercenaries in the service of the Duke of the Provence had invaded Piemont and two attempts of our returning troops to liberate besieged Turino were driven off. So we decided to retaliate and invaded Provence during the spring of 1421. This decision proved to be very wise, as our Burgundian allies bet the enemy force in Piemont. The fleeing mercenaries were easily annihilated by our reinforcements. With their troops gone and our fleet controlling the sea (after defeating the few ships Provence sent against them) the citizens of Marseille surrendered on the 13th of July. As Provence had lost their northern territories of Maine to Brittany one year ago, they now begged for peace, which was granted two months later – Maine remained with Brittany. With our southern border secured we moved our troops to the rich province of Languedoc, of which we gained total control during April 1422. The following fast autumn campaign led to the fell of the city and region of Lyon on New Year’s Day of 1423.
Beaten on all sides, France signed a white peace with Burgundy in October and finally on the 24th of December (Christmas) with England – France ceded Paris and the Ile de France to England and almost all of southern France to Savoy.

But with greater power came greater responsibility: heretics, who could prosper under the weak rule of the French kings, agitated against our just rule and provoked a rebellion of the peasantry in Dauphinee in 1424 – it took almost two years and the live of the Count d`Auberay (who was assassinated by some fanatics) to bring them to justice and to retake the city of Grenoble.

But peace was short lived at best. England, seeing the weakness of France (which had lost Guyenne to Aragon) declared war on France on New Year’s Day of 1429, and we honoured our alliance. Repeating our campaign 8 years ago we invaded Provence, besieged Marseille and annexed the whole Duchy in April. But again enemy troops from Auvergne and Bourbounais brought war to our homelands and again we couldn’t defeat them. As this time no allies came to our help, we had to ask France for a separate peace, paying over 200 pounds of gold as retribution, leaving our treasury complete empty. We even had to sell our fleet to the bankers of Genoa to avoid being in their debt.

To strengthen the state after these exhausting years, Duke Amedee totally reformed law and constitution in 1430, consolidating his realm.
In 1431 peace returned to the rest of France too, leaving England in the control of Normandie and Orleans.
The following years were prosperous. Duke Amedee VIII decided to spent his last years serving God in January 1434, leaving the throne and a powerful state to his son Louis I. As his father would have, he honoured our alliance again, when Burgundy declared war upon an alliance of northern German states in February of the same year. Within the next 4 years these German states fell to either Burgundy or England. As this war far from home was expensive, but without gain we greeted the next war of Burgundy – this time against Cologne and the Palatinate in 1439– with almost no enthusiasm. When England declared war upon Scotland (which is rumoured to be somewhere near the end of the known world) we left this bloodthirsty alliance, negotiating peace with Cologne only a few days later. We had enough of adventures in the north and refocused on our neighbouring countries, establishing ties of blood with France and Castille (which had gained control over Aragon after their disastrous war against the northern African states).
When Amedee VIII was elected (Anti) Pope Felix VI on 24th of November 1439 our relations to the other European states greatly improved. As the new Pope was fund of the art of cartography we soon bought and traded maps from Cyprus to Norway – even the Portuguese shared their secret knowledge of the African coasts with us and in March 1440 we granted some merchants from Turino the right to establish a trading post in the region of Louga.
As the second war between Burgundy and France ended in 1444 (England lost Normandie and Orleans) we decided to join the alliance of France and Castille and fought two short wars against the rebels of Guyenne and Catalonia with them. After only 4 years our settlement in Louga had developed to a real colony and the citizens of Marseille (still ashamed we had to sell our fleet to liberate them) built 5 mighty warships to help us expand this new province.
The long war we fought against Naples since 1447 triggered a political crisis in 1451, which led to peace a few days later. As this was treason in the eyes of the French king he banned us from the alliance with France and Castille.

But even without war Savoy was growing: 1452 Louga was declared a regular province of the Duchy of Savoy - all of the numerous but peaceful natives had adopted our culture and religion, and it took only two years for them to collect 100 pounds of gold as a gift for our great and wise Duke.
The following ten years were peaceful and prosperous. Many reforms were made during these years (our chancellor, the bishop of Lyon, proved to be a really excellent minister). When Amedee IX rose to the throne in 1465 some opposing nobles, allied with some dubious foreign power, tried to overthrow his just rule. This experience, the young Duke had to make, was the end of our isolation. He soon focused his attention on the warring Italian city states and joined the alliance of Tuscany, Modena and Papal States. The war these states were fighting against Hungary and Croatia was far away and therefore didn’t bother us too much.

The first days of 1472 not only saw the war between England and Burgundy over the Dutch territories, but also the death of our young Duke. His son Philibert I was still a child and the regent, Duchess Anne, was weak. History is cyclic, and the civil war was inevitable. After two bloody years peace returned to Savoy - and Burgundy controlled all of the Low Countries.
Finally a white peace was signed between Tuscany and Hungary in 1476.

It is the year 1479. Philibert I is Duke of Savoy. With new fortresses in Savoy and Piemont guarding our homeland, a filled treasury and strong allies, the young Duke is planning his next moves: the people of Roussilion, Sardinia and Sicily suffer under Muslim tyranny and the citizens of Milano pray for liberation from the Germans of the Palatinate.
Opportunities arise. It is a time for advisors. And then… .
 
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First Lieutenant
Apr 11, 2005
237
0
Screenshots are coming soon.

As this is the first forum I participate, I'll need some time for the classical try and error lerning curve (and today is an error lecture).
 

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Field Marshal
Mar 6, 2003
3.699
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Congratulations on your fine start, in game and in story. I played a very enjoyable campaign as Savoy recently myself. Do you intend to eliminate France completely, or just keep it weak? And what about colonies -- will Louga just be the start of a grand colonial empire, or will you limit yourself to a small area? I'm asking these out of curiosity just to compare your game style and goals to mine.

In my game a critical gain I made was a decisive victory over Aragon around 1500 in which I gained Sardinia and Sicily, removing them completely from Italy. But in your game it seems that Algiers et al have accomplished that already? :eek: And they took Roussilon too?

Savoy gets some good monarchs and great leaders, too. But it is a bit odd in the early 1500s when Bayard fights against himself :wacko: as represented in both the French and Savoyard armies.

Good luck as you continue.
 

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First Lieutenant
Apr 11, 2005
237
0
Here the promised screenshot


savoymap1479.jpg

Europe 1479


jwolf:
At first I want to thank you for your kind words; I’m glad someone read it ;-).

At the moment France is no threat, and further conquest of French territories would mean war with Burgundy, Helvetia and Bourbonnais. I’m more concerned about Austria: they had a good start annexing Bavaria and Salzburg, and after they inherit Tyrol they’re just one step away from Italy. Building a colonial empire is not my primary goal, but I take what I can get (trading maps with Portugal or Spain should be possible). Sardinia is definitely the primary target at the moment.

Aragon lost Gerona and Roussillion to Tlemcen and all islands to Tunisia about 1450 – the remains were annexed by Spain a few years later.

I’ve three principles when it comes to EU2. First, I never do anything just because of game mechanical effects if it has no historical sense (like declaring war on China just to get out of an alliance). Second, I adopt my actions to the actual monarch (one with DIP 1 and MIL 8 is going to conquer anything around, one with ADM 8 concentrates on infrastructures and domestic settings). Third, I try to stay below a certain number of Bad Boy points (12 for most European nations like Savoy). That’s sometimes just a kind of second best solution, but I like it this way.


Next update will be online this weekend.
 
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First Lieutenant
Apr 11, 2005
237
0
Part II

Part II


th_cd4_savoywappen.jpg
actual coat of arms of House Savoy​


On the 14th of April 1482 Charle I, who will be called The Warrior, became Duke of Savoy. One of the first decisions he had to decide on, was a petition of redress presented by the citizens of Turino. Although Charle was not interested in administrative matters, he had a strong sense for justice and accepted the petition, underestimating the trouble this would cause. The unrest didn’t smooth down and caused a political crisis in spring 1485. But the Duke was strong, and only few months later the situation stabilized and his good politics did pay.

But foreign politics proved to be even more difficult. In March 1487 our alliance with the Pope, Modena and Tuscany expired – and Tuscany rejected our proposal to renew it under our leadership. Even worse, only a few days later, Tuscany provoked the Pope to declared war on them. Seeing this aggression against the Holy Father, we joined arms with him and Modena immediately. But Tuscany defeated the troops the Pope and Modena sent against them, and then invaded Marche. Now we had to intervene. A treaty with Genoa allowed us military access through their territories – our troops arrived in Firenze in June. After one year of fighting we controlled the whole province. As Modena had destroyed the remaining enemy troops, Tuscany begged for peace. But in view of the unquestionable insanity the leaders of Tuscany had displayed during the last year, Charle decided to declare himself Duke of Tuscany and incorporated Firenze in our own realm.
Seeing the chance of a complete reorganization of central Italy, the Pope declared war on Siena two month later. And again we could see history repeating itself: Siena destroyed the Papal troops and besieged Roma, while we were besieging Siena. We successfully assaulted the strong fortifications in February 1489 –Siena shared the fate of Tuscany and became part of the Savoien lands. Duke Charle was wounded leading the final assault and died several days later on the 17th of March.

The situation was more, than his heir, Charles II, could handle. He failed to talk the Pope out of a campaign to regain Spanish Apulia. The war with Spain started on the 7th of October and was fought without mercy. The fighting went on for over 4 years in Italy, and then Spanish troops invaded Languedoc, bringing the war to our French territories. This was the moment, France and Auvergne had waited for. They declared war on us in February 1493. Attacked on all sides Duke Charle started to negotiate peace with Spain – a formal treaty was signed one month later, after we had paid a horrendous sum as retribution for lost Spanish possessions in Firenze and Siena (over 350 pounds of gold were shipped to Madrid). During this troubled time good news arrived from the people of Sicily, who had overthrown the Muslim tyranny of Tunisia. In a gesture of real Grandessa, Duke Charles sent them our last money to fight the Heathen forces. We were able to defeat Auvergne with our last ounce of strength in March 1494 – as they saw the consequences of following France, they accepted to be or vassals in the future. Peace with France and Scotland was signed 2 weeks later. The Pope accepted peace with Spain in April, ceding Marche to the king in Madrid.

1494, the year of peace, was a year of exceptional harvests too. New vineyards and vine cellars were built in Provence and Firenze. Duke Charle, who was tired of martial matters, made General Bayard commanding marshal of our forces (a soldier who had distinguished himself in many battles). This position was confirmed by Philippe II, who followed his father on the throne in 1496, and Philibert II, who became Duke in November 1497, after his older brother was killed in a hunting accident.

Philibert was a pragmatic thinker who saw the damage, the actions of Charle the Warrior had done to our reputation in the Christian world. In the following years he improved our relations with Bourbonnais, Auvergne, Modena, Genoa and especially Spain through numerous gift (Spain even renewed their royal ties with us in 1502), his ambassadors travelled as far as Ethiopia, returning with maps of Eastern Africa, and our merchants achieved great influence in the Ligurian markets. Although a man of peace, Duke Philibert initiated several fortification programs on our western border. In the meantime, war was raging in Germany: Austria, at war with all of its neighbours, lost all the provinces they inherited from Tyrol to the Palatinate, transforming their rule over Lombardia from a disturbance to a threat.

When Philibert died in September 1504, the whole Duchy mourned for him. The next Duke of Savoy, Charle III, was a man with strict principles (he was called The Good in his later days): he followed the Pope in a war against Poland, Bohemia and Brandenburg in August (the Polish king wanted the right to appoint bishops himself) and refused to grant the cities old rights in November (the cities bowed to his strength and sent a gift of 200 pounds of gold as regret in the following year). The conflict between the Pope and Poland lasted till summer 1506, when a white peace was signed.

savoyitaly1512.jpg

Italy 1512

Charle ruled with an iron hand and brought order and justice to the land in the following years. Impressed by this strength of will, our old allies in Modena decided to learn from this great man and became our vassals in late 1512. One year later, a treaty of eternal friendship was signed and gifts were exchanged (they got a book of law; we got 200 pounds of gold).

Then, in October 1518, Venice annexed our cousins in Mantua. Only 4 months later Burgundy did the same with our friends of Bourbonnais. After they incorporated Helvetia into their realm in June, they now encircled us almost completely. When Charle then heard of the heretics, who called themselves Protestants, bringing chaos all over northern Germany, he decided to act and to restore at least some of the injustice of the last years. Troops were raised, and on the 15th of June 1520 we declared war on Venice together with the Pope and Modena. Our troops stormed Mantua in the first days of 1521, and the Papal troops captured Venice itself 4 months later. When Modena sent its forces down the Adria, Venice gave Mantua in our hands and paid 150 pounds of gold as retribution.

One year later, Bohemia took the Protestant confession, causing a political crisis in Austria, which became a vassal of Spain thereafter. As good Christians, we gave some of the Austrian refugees new land to claim and settle in Provence, where they lived in peace and prospered for the next ten years like the whole Duchy.

When our alliance expired in 1532 we tried to renew it, but the new Pope rejected our proposal. Instead, we asked our vassals Auvergne, but after noticing they almost had now troops, Charle decided to rule the Cevennes as one of our provinces from now on.
Two years later the people of Sardinia rebelled against Tunisia, but were beaten by the overwhelming Muslim forces. But Duke Charle wasn’t the kind of man to tolerate cruelty and injustice. The fleet was gathered, and in May 1535 we invaded Sardinia, which we controlled after only 6 months of fighting. As our alliance’s fleet dominated the seas around the island, Tunisia had to accept our rule before the first year of the war was over. Without hesitating we confiscated the properties of the Muslim nobles (sending them as a gift to the Pope), and brought monks from Piemont to return Sardinia to the True Faith. But only 8 months later they rebelled, and the missionaries were driven away – 2 years later the Pope granted us the right of a crusade and they were converted by the sword!
But in the meantime Genoa, feeling surrounded and angered by our economic dominance in the region, declared war on us in January 1537. They moved into Piemont and we were unable to stop them. Fights between brothers are always the bloodiest ones, and this war against Genoa was no exception. It took 5 years to stop them, regain our lost territories and bringing the war back to Genoa. The 150 pounds of gold Genoa paid in 1542 were ridiculous compared to what this long war had cost us.

But some things can’t be bought, they must be earned – the loyalty of great men. Such a man was a young captain called Placentia, who was an expert in scouting enemy territories. This talented man was sent on a secret mission by Duke Charle himself. Accompanied only by few trusted man he boarded ships in Marseille, avoided the Genoese fleet and sailed to Louga. Now his true mission began: he took land of the Portuguese Cape Verde Island on the 4th of April 1538, and then set sail for Nuevo Espana. His expedition arrived at the deserted island of Barbados one year later. On New Years Eve 1540 we had established a small colony there and discovered the nearby islands of Trinidad and Tobago, which were colonised soon thereafter. Guadeloupe, Dominiqua and Antigua followed until 1545. Then Placentia, Knight of Savoy and Count of Barbados died of exhaustion.

savoycolonies1546.jpg

Our colonies

But European affairs developed too in these years. After the war with Genoa was over, the Pope rejoined our glorious alliance (the assassination of our ambassador in Roma by an unknown and therefore unpunished power could not prevent this). After a boundary dispute with Burgundy, the people of Lyon extended the fortifications of their cities – even before Duke Charle could give the order himself. After a rebellion of the old noble families in 1546, Genoa was no longer a vassal of Spain, and joined our alliance due to our old family ties.

Then, in April 147, the latest Protestant heresy reached our lands: out of Geneva this radical movement – the Reformed, as they called themselves – spread to Scotland, the Low Lands and south western France. Immediately troops and Jesuit missionaries were sent to those provinces confessing to this strange and dangerous kind of faith – the good Catholics of our Italian domains gave 200 pounds of gold for this noble mission. On Christmas 1500 the Pope declared a crusade against the Heretics of Languedoc, and Prince Emmanuel Philibert returned their souls to the Holy Catholics Church with his sword – after he completed this campaign, he took command over our troops guarding the Jesuits in Dauphine. In 1552 our colony on Barbados was acknowledged as province of the realm, and the settlement of the other islands was in progress.

When Duke Charle died during the first days of 1553 the Pope himself crowned Emanuel Philibert Archduke of Savoy and – as reward for his deeds for the True Faith – King of Sardinia. The new Duke renewed our alliance with Genoa and the Papal State in February; Modena, however, became part of the Duchy of Savoy.

It is the year of our Lord 1554. Emmanuel Philibert I, Archduke of Savoy, Duke of Provence, Tuscany and Modena, Margrave of Mantua and Piemont, Count of Siena, Knight of the Holy Legion, rules over our great nation. May his reign be long and successful… .
 
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Field Marshal
Mar 6, 2003
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Good progress with Savoy! Sounds like you had a real tough fight during the 1490s against both Spain and France -- you did well to come out of it as well as you did. Your conversions seem to have gone well, too. I liked your interpretations of the random events, for example, your murdered ambassador in Rome. I am wondering how you will position Savoy in relation to Burgundy and France. Should be interesting.
 

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First Lieutenant
Apr 11, 2005
237
0
jwolf:
France is unimportant: I'm sure Burgundy, Britanny and maybe Spain will take care of it. Burgundy is a real problem. At the moment I can't see how to beat them - I'll focus on Italy instead (I'll try to get Lombardia soon - it is rich and a land connection to Mantua). Burgundy started like a rocket, but it will fall sooner or later: they made no concessions in the Dutch liberty events (revolt risk 21% in Flanders), almost entire Europe hates them (half of them with a CB), they have no allies but a BB of 23. I'll just have to wait for a good moment. I have a great monarch / leader and I intend to use him... .

Other problems:
- how to get provinces from Papal States and later annex the whole thing
- how to get rid of Genoa and later annex the whole thing (20k troops on Corsica and level 3 fortress)
- how to get CBs against interesting nations (didn't have one for 25 years before Venice annexed Mantua)
- what to do with my inflation of 13%
- what is the best alliance to join (Austria?)
- when to fight over Marche and Apulia against Spain (now or later)
Good advisors are always welcome.

As I don`t have to work the next days - and therefor have time to play until 1619 - we'll know on wednesday or thursday.
 

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Duke Valentino
Mar 23, 2003
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The Suebian said:
- how to get provinces from Papal States and later annex the whole thing

Really the only way to do that is to force-vassalize and later diplo-annex them. If they get annexed by someone else, that's even better because all catholics get a permanent CB on anyone who occupies the Holy See. But any way you slice it, staying in alliance with the Pope doesn't really get you that big an advantage because A- it's a dead end alliance (no possibility of diplo-vassalization), B- the Papal States are usually militarily inept, C- you get a free CB on anybody fighting them anyway.

- how to get rid of Genoa and later annex the whole thing (20k troops on Corsica and level 3 fortress)

The one-province mountainous islands in the Mediterranean are nearly untakeable except by brutal assault. If you can control the Ligurian sea, you can repeatedly attack them with overwhelming forces until you cover Corsica, at which point you can dump 100 cannons or so and try an assault.

- how to get CBs against interesting nations (didn't have one for 25 years before Venice annexed Mantua)

CBs are random and hard to get. One thing is that, with the way Savoy is positioned, your stability costs are more than likely quite low and you could just eat the stab hit from declaring war without a CB, if you really wanted to.

- what to do with my inflation of 13%

Don't sweat 13%, that's no big deal.

- what is the best alliance to join (Austria?)

Depends on your situation. Austria is a good choice a lot of the time because they are usually very strong. Since I typically do almost all my fighting regardless of my alliances, I tend to build my own.

- when to fight over Marche and Apulia against Spain (now or later)

Whichever way makes it easiest for you to beat them down.
 

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Colonel
Aug 27, 2004
953
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The Suebian great AAR, lots of progress.
I think you are in a really strong position, but I would focus on bridging the gap between you and your territories.

Who are the Palatinate allied to?
If you can take Lombarde then you will get a big cash bonus from the connection to your capital.

Does Genoa have one COT or two, if it has only one I would try to Diplo annex them. With the rulers that you have it shouldn't be too hard.
 

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First Lieutenant
Apr 11, 2005
237
0
Part III

Part III


savoyep1st.jpg
Emmanuel Philibert I “Iron Head”​


The enthronisation of Emmanuel Philibert as Duke of Greater Savoy was accompanied by a wave of obstruction unknown in Savoien history: at first, the peasants of Lyon rebelled without being provoked (one of the first laws of the new Duke even strengthened the rights of the serfs), then the heretics of the Cevennes rose against our attempt to regain their souls for the Catholic Faith and, in November 1554, some treacherous nobles tried to overthrow the Dukes rule with the help of Burgundy. But it was in these early days of his reign, that Emmanuel Philibert earned himself the name “Iron Head”: he made no concessions and brought all rebels – nobles, priests and peasants alike – to justice, and soon peace was restored throughout the realm When rebels took control of Genoa in March 1555, the Duke himself led the troops we sent to help our allies. After liberating the city and restoring law and order, the senate of Genoa decided to place itself under our protection – and Genoa was a vassal of Greater Savoy from this day on.

The following years saw several revolts (Sardinia 1557 and 1563, Cevennes 1558, Mantua 1561), but none of them lasted for long. It was a time of peace, the land prospered and the positive effects of a good government could be seen everywhere (especially in 1561). Although we managed to regain the Cevennes for the True Faith in April 1562 – thus being an all Catholic nation again – the Pope refused to renew our military alliance in December of the same year and even the greatest gifts couldn’t change his mind.
Nevertheless, Duke Emmanuel Philibert decided to focus on our Italian affairs and moved our capitol to Turino in February 1563. The new palace with its fine arts galleries was completed two years later and the Duke took residence there immediately.
With the help of the former Duke of Modena (who was one of the greatest ministers Savoy ever had), the government was totally reformed in June 1565. One of the central points of these reforms was the incorporation of Genoa in our realm: as the city state was suffering under continuing political crisis for several years, the senate accepted our proposal in August (some senators received very generous compensations). To counter a nationalistic revolt, the strong Genoese army was moved from Corsica to Lyon.

For two generation Burgundy had been a constant threat for our French possessions. But now the rulers in Brussels had more problems than they could handle: the Dutch provinces were in open rebellion and had founded the nation of the free Netherlands, the Huguenots of southern France tired to do the same, and the war against Lorraine and its allies was long and bloody. It was the perfect time for all who wanted to settle old grudges with Burgundy. Diplomats crossed Europe from east to west, and in March 1568 a new alliance between Spain, Austria and Savoy was announced.
Only one week later our troops moved into Bourgogne, Auvergne and Franche Comte. We met almost no resistance and besieged the strong fortresses without further disturbance. We soon controlled Auvergne, but as the fortifications of Dijon were strong and the winter was hard, the siege of Bourgogne took the whole year of 1569 and further into 1570. Then, Austria declared war on the Palatinate. As Burgundy was considerably weakened (the Netherlands had become an established nation, the Huguenots of Guyenne were independent, and Lorraine controlled Nivernais) we were satisfied (for the moment): Burgundy ceded Navarra to Spain, we gained Auvergne and 250 pounds of gold.
The money gained this way was immediately used to convince some German lords to grant our troops free access through their domains - our troops reached Heidelberg 3 months later, defeated the weak garrison and besieged the city. In the meantime, the Duke returned to Piemont, gathered new troops and led them to Milano. One year later, the Palatinate had lost control over all their territories. In the peace of February 1572 they returned Tyrol to Austria, and Lombardia became part of Savoy.

Just one month after Emmanuel Philibert had returned to Turino a secret message from the Emperor arrived: the Pope and the Hungarian king (together with some minor German lords) obviously planned to oppose Habsburg dominance in the Reich – the one and only thing the Emperor couldn’t tolerate. With a heavy heart the Duke assured our loyalty. When Austria declared war on the Pope in November 1573 our troops were prepared - Romagna and Roma were taken by a coup de main. Although the Pope was furious (and threatened to excommunicate Duke Emmanuel Philibert) he had to admit, that he preferred disciplined Savoien troops to German and Spanish mercenaries (like the ones sacking Naples). Now we had to wait for Austria to settle their affairs in Germany. The Pope conspired against us from his private chambers in the Vatican, inspiring some fanatics in Liguria and Lombardia to short lived revolts in 1575 (and again one of our most important officials, the governor of Milano, was assassinated). But Duke “Iron Head” made no concessions and our troops stayed.
When Austria signed peace with Hungary in May 1576 (after defeating several minor German states) it was by common consent, that we received control of Romagna from the Pope (his involvement in earthly affairs had to be stopped).
One year later, we had another call to the arms from Austria – this time against the remnant of the French kingdom and Portugal. Again we followed the Emperor (but didn’t send troops); Spain had ties of blood to both nations and broke the alliance with their Austrian cousins. When Austria annexed France in 1579 (and after some fighting in northern Africa) we signed a separate peace with Portugal and returned to status quo.

Duke Emmanuel Philibert used the following year to settle the nations’ economy. He cracked down on corrupt officials and regained some privileges of the old cities for the crown. The Genoese bankers proved to be good advisors (one of them even was promoted royal economist). The exceptional harvests of 1579, the continuing economical growth and the work of our economists led to an increased trust in our currency, almost removing inflation till the end of the year.

When Emmanuel Philibert died on the 4th of March 1580, national mourning lasted 2 weeks. He won Genoa, Corsica, Auvergne, Lombardia and Romagna for the Savoien crown. Burgundy no longer was an overwhelming threat, and our relations with the other Catholic nations had considerably improved under his reign. He reformed the state, making the power of the Duke almost absolute. His son, Charle Emmanuel I, had to prove he was a worthy successor.

The first test of his abilities came, when Austria declared war on Brandenburg (leading an alliance of almost all Protestant German minors) in November 1582 – and on Würzburg (leading the Catholic nations of the Reich) just 3 months later. Although we honoured our contractual responsibilities, the young Duke was wise enough not to send troops this far from home (we still remember the campaign in Oldenburg almost 150 years ago). The enemy, Duke Charle Emmanuel was fighting during his first years on the throne, was a much closer one: lacking law-abidingness, waste and Protestantism.
Within the next few years, he withdrew the right to administer justice from the local nobles, promoting ducal judges instead in every province of his realm (and Tax collectors were sent even to our West Indian colonies). At the same time, merchants of the North African states together with those from Protestant Germany were banished from the Ligurian markets, thus realizing the mercantilist doctrine of our economists (again a ducal economist was promoted in 1592).

As the German wars had ended in 1587, the Savoien people lived in peace under the severe, but always paternal dominion of its Duke. Then, on the 24th of August 1598, Austria declared war on Burgundy. As we had reinforced our troops on the northern border farsighted way, we immediately took action, invading Limousin, Bourgogne and Franche Comte at the same time – Burgundy was totally surprised (most of their troops were fighting the Netherlands and Huguenots) and their resistance was weak. Just one year later, the peace of Geneva was signed: Austria regained the Swiss territories, Limousin and Franche Comte came under our hard, however fair dominion.
Although this war was victorious without question, our commanders complained about the inferior armament compared to Burgundian and Austrian troops. As Charle Emmanuel was no hesitant man, he laid the foundations of two weapon manufactories (one in Dauphine, one in Auvergne) in March 1600 and, after similar complaints came from our naval leaders, commissioned a naval equipment manufactory on Corsica 2 years later.

The first decade of the 17th century saw numerous revolts throughout France (except the Savoien provinces). In 1605 the people of Brittany declared their independence from Spain, and three years later a grandchild of the last King of France led a successful rebellion against the Austrian governors in Maine and Orleans. As we were related with this new king (who called himself Henri IV), the Duke decided not to help Austria regain these territories (as we ruled over no German provinces, we couldn’t see why Austria should rule over French ones). Without any possibility to move troops to the revolting territories, Austria had to accept the new French kingdom one year later. After the situation had calmed down for another year, Charle Emmanuel entered a military alliance with his French cousin and Spain.
As the Savoien-French cooperation in all areas deepened in the next years, it was only natural for France to become vassals of Greater Savoy in July 1612. Five years later Henri even shared the Spanish maps he had got as a wedding present with us.

savoyeurope1619.jpg

Europe 1619

The first decades of this century saw many great adventures too. One of them, a man who called himself after his place of birth Mantua, offered his services to the Duke in June 1621, who gave him command over a small expedition immediately. One year later we took possession of Cuyuni and Surinam on the northern coast of South America, and after another 4 months, we discovered the rich gold deposits of Guyana. At the very moment we set sail for the Bahamas, France declared war on England. With the English navy against us, the exploration of the Bahamas and the Bermudas in 1622 was nothing less than a heroic deed. Far from home and without any hope of reinforcements, Captain Mantua decided to take the offensive: he arrived at Chesapeake Bay in November 1622 and took control of the undefended English settlements there. After exchanging gifts with the local natives (and gaining knowledge of the local areas), he decided to move south, avoided English militia in Roanoke, and reached Spanish Florida during the first days of 1624. In the meantime, peace had been signed in Europe: France regained Caux, Spain kept the English colonies in the Caribbean.
But this good news didn’t reach our adventuring hero in time. After exploring the coast of the Gulf of Mexico, his traces lose in the far west of North America – three years later, the last survivors of his expedition, return to Barbados, bringing with them detailed maps of a region the Spanish call California. Especially a region called Monterrey seemed worth to become a Savoien colony soon.

Since 1580, for almost 50 years, Charle Emmanuel the Great has been Duke of Savoy. But when France declared war on Lorraine in July 1629 and Lorraine sent forces to Franche Comte soon thereafter, he wanted to lead the troops to liberate the province himself.
Charle Emmanuel, Duke of Greater Savoy, died one year later, in June 1630, fighting the third battle against our enemies in Franche Comte (those who stood beside him say, that no enemies sword reached him – the murderous summer heat of this years was his fate).

Now his second son, Victor Amedee I, has to prove himself a worthy monarch of our glorious nation.
 

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Pablo Sanchez:
Thanks for your advice - as you can read, I used it (no CB's, no problem - an alliance with Austria allways helps).
Rest of Papal States will follow soon (just need a CB).

BBBD:
Diplo annexing Genoa was the best (and cheapest) way - and I had luck (good monarch, excelent minister, some realy incompetent Doge).
All the allies of the Palatinate dishonored the alliance after Austria was in, so this was an easy victory too.

As Savoy is a kind of outperfomer, I'll have to restate my goals:
- control all Iatlien provinces in 1819
- control all French provinces in 1819
- hold my own against Austria and Spain
- build a colonial empire

I hope to be able to post the next update this week. But first I have to plan a great war... .
 
Last edited:

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Very well done, especially the diplomatic game. That was a nice touch to get the Spanish maps from the newborn France. :) Good work. Your Savoy is truly a powerhouse now. In my game I allied with Austria fairly early and then stayed with them in dogged loyalty to the rest of the game. But I have to admit your approach with a more flexible diplomatic strategy has lead to a better game, and probably more fun.
 

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Aug 27, 2004
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I bow before you in a "we're not worthy sort of way"

Damn you kicked ass in that update, getting Genoa to accept annexation has always been a problem for me when I play a italian minor.

I always thought that you should be able to buy provinces like in Victoria, so then you could buy essential provinces from allies. Like Naples for example.

I take it that the light blue on the map is the Hugenouts?? My haven't they done well
 

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jwolf:
The feather is mightier than the sword :). If you liked diplomacy this time, you'll love it in part IV.
I have to admit, that playing the underdog Savoy was more fun than playing the major power.

BBBD:
I never really planned to Diplo annex Genoa, but then I saw that my state gift improved relations from -87 to +200. Then I checked the DIP abilities... .
Light blue is France, Huguenots are the dark green ones in Guyenne. Sicily is dark green, Brittany is dark green: an open door is an ivetation.

Is their any correlation between random events and domestic settings? I never had that much assasinations and excellent ministers.

Next update should be ready tomorrow.
 

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The Suebian said:
Is their any correlation between random events and domestic settings? I never had that much assasinations and excellent ministers.

There is a good FAQ on random events and DP settings. In short, some random events are affected by these, for example, Petition for Redress, Gift to State, Conversion of Heretics, and Unexpected Invention to name a few. But the two you cited don't have anything to do with your DPs -- you were just very unlucky and lucky, respectively. ;) I wish I could have some of your excellent ministers in my current game with the Mamelukes, stuck with a nearly eternal 3-3-3 monarch.

I hope in your next session you will take out some of the other green nations and make the map less confusing. :p Good luck.
 

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I also see that the Habsburg countries of Austria and Spain borders eachother, that usually means that one of them gets Diplo-annexed. Then you have a problem.
 

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Part IV

Part IV


Pistolen.jpg
tools of the trade, around 1600​


Just a few days after Victor Amedee was crowned Duke of Greater Savoy, Besancon fell, and the Duke of Lorraine sent his troops towards Lyon. But this time, the fortifications proved too strong for the attackers. As several fruitless assaults and the winter of 1631 had decimated their numbers, they had to retreat in March. After we recaptured France Comte a few months later, Lorraine ceded Nivernais to France and a peace treaty was signed.

Victor Amedee was a man of peace. When Spain declared war on the Netherlands, Scotland and England 6 months later, the Duke followed the example of his French cousin and refused to send our troops. Instead he renewed our alliance with France and even convinced the Emperor to join a couple of weeks later.
The French king died on 6th of October 1633 without an heir, leaving Duke Victor Amedee not as his closest, but as his highest relative. No one questioned our claims on the French territories (Orleans, Maine, Nivernais and Caux), which became part of Greater Savoy. As Paris was held be Burgundy and Reims belonged to Lorraine, our Duke could not be crowned King of France – for now.

In 1633 another 2 provinces were gained for the Savoien crown: Monterrey und Guyana. Soon the first shipments of American gold arrived in Genoa, inspiring many Italians to search their luck far from home in our North American colonies.
But problems followed the gold as faithfully as a dog. In February 1634, an epidemic plaque arrived onboard the ships, which transformed many Italian regions into graveyards (and returned almost 10 years later again). The new wealth also attracted dubious characters: corrupt officials (their swift execution caused some unrest) and doubtful monastic orders (reminding them of their vows of poverty even caused more unrest).
Duke Victor Amedee enjoyed seeing our territories overseas grow and prosper, and his merits for their cause can’t be stresses enough (for example, he ordered the construction of great shipyard in Genoa in 1635).

When he died totally unexpected in October 1637, his son was too young to rule the nation. His wife, Francois Hyacinthe of France, became regent instead. Her short reign was full of disasters. Just a few weeks after she took the throne, a great fire destroyed our weapon manufactory in Dauphine (we rebuilt it several years later). Then, in March 1638, Spanish troops took control of our colonies in San Bernardino and Surinam. Letters of protest were sent to Madrid, but the Spanish king didn’t answer. Instead, his ambassador gave us a copy of the Treaty of Tordesillas. As Spain knew, that the Pope gave us an exceptional permission over 100 years ago (together with the right to move our troops freely through his domains), this was one of the greatest scandal at our court in The last 100 years. Actually, our relation with Spain had become worse and worse during the last decades. Spanish troops had repeatedly attacked our settlements in Surinam, Guyana, Monterrey and on the West Indian islands (they even besieged Barbados in 1635), and two of Spain’s vassals openly harassed our merchants. One of the last decisions Francois Hyacinthe made as a regent, was to follow Austria into a war against Sweden and Denmark in June 1639. Only a few years ago, both realms had great generals which could lead their armies to a quick victory. But as Albrecht Wallenstein and Gustav Adolph of Sweden died 5 years ago, this Austrian adventure promised to be a long and bloody one (maybe 30 years). For this reason, the nobility (especially the Italian one), opposed the regent and forced her to abdicate in favour of her son.

Charle Emmanuel II was crowned Duke on the 7th of September 1639. As he became Duke thanks to the support of the Italian nobility, the French nobles now feared to lose influence and power. The old conflict between the French and Italian party, continental and colonial politics, soon led to the 2nd civil war in Savoy, which would last for over five years (especially Maine and Orleans were strongholds of the revolting nobles). For the first years of this crisis, Charle Emmanuel could count on the services of his uncle, who was appointed chancellor. But after this loyal minister was assassinated in March 1443, the young Duke was on his own.

Charle Emmanuel II didn’t share neither the commanding abilities of his grandfather, nor his father’s administrative abilities. But he was a man with a keen mind – and he had the vision of Savoy becoming a colonial power like Spain and Portugal. He used the years of internal crisis to make preparations for the day he would realize his dream (signing a white peace with Sweden in 1641 just was the first step). No one asked, if all the troops the Duke raised were really necessary to fight a small rebellion. Some questioned the use of improving our fortifications in Southern France and on the islands in the Mediterranean, but they soon remained silent again. Local militia was trained in our colonies, but staid under arms for almost 3 years now.

Duke Charle Emmanuel travelled to Roma on the 7th of August 1645. After a secret meeting with the Pope, that lasted almost the whole night, Savoy was declared sole Defender of the True Faith. One day later, we declared war on Münster, Würzburg and Spain.
As Austria refused to fight their Spanish cousins, the Duke travelled to Vienna immediately. In the meantime, his troops invaded Marche and Apulia. When he met the Emperor one month later, both provinces were under siege (Surinam, Caribe, Martinique and San Bernardino were already controlled by our troops). No one really knows, what the monarchs discussed in the Emperor’s private chambers, but on the next day, Austria joined arms with Savoy.

savoywar1645.jpg

a time of war

With our eastern border secured, our troops began to invade Roussilion, but had to retreat when Spain sent its home army against them. From now on, the war in Europe was an endless fighting over the control of Roussilion and Languedoc: one day our troops were in control, just to lose the next battle several weeks later (and just to be victorious in another 2 weeks).
Our darkest hour came in March 1646, when 4.000 brave Spanish soldiers defending their northern border completely annihilated our invasion forces – 37.000 sons of Savoy were slain.
The outcome of this war solely depended on our colonies now. Our fleet set sail for America during the first days of the war, and finally passed the rocks of Gibraltar after defeating 5 Spanish fleets sent to stop them (but now there was no fleet left anymore to help our colonies fighting Spanish superiority). Our troops in the West Indian islands had taken Curacao, Puerto Rico and Tortuga in a coup the main. But as the mighty Spanish fleet controlled the seas, no reinforcements could reach them. Instead, Spanish troops landed on the Bermudas and Bahamas. One year later they started to besiege Barbados and Dominiqua. The war in the Caribbean almost seemed lost, when we heard about the continuing exhaustion of their American mines in summer 1646. Without gold, Spain could not pay its mercenaries. Until the end of the year, rebelling soldiers controlled almost the entire vice-kingdom of Peru and Cuba. In the very moment these news reached Europe, England declared war on Spain. Now victory was ours – we just had to convince Spain of it too.
In October 1647 we successfully assaulted the last Spanish strongholds in Italy. In November we regained control over Martinique, Barbados and Dominiqua. After our troops landed on the Bahamas and the Bermudas in February and April of the next year, Spain accepted to start peace negotiations. Formal treaties were signed on the 3rd of May 1648. Spain gave up Apulia and Marche; San Bernardino would be part of Savoien California. Caribe, Surinam and Martinique completed our possession of the Windward Islands and the adjacent provinces on the South American continent.

We were still suffering under the price of this victory (ruined reputation, high inflation, civil unrest caused by revolting peasant), when Austria declared war on Poland, Russia and Albania in November 1649. As Austrian help during our war against Spain had been almost unexciting, and the Emperor showed no consideration for our difficult situation, Duke Charle Emmanuel decided not to follow his cousin. Instead, we entered an alliance with Lorraine and a man who called himself Louis XIV, King of France, after leading a rebellion against the Spanish governor in Berri during our war against Spain.

The following years were spent rebuilding our former strength. A short war together with Lorraine and France against Burgundy in 1650 (Picardie became French, and Lorraine gained Luxemburg) was the exception. Although Luxemburg had been captured with our help, the Duke of Lorraine refused to become vassal of Savoy one year later (he was a proud man), but sent a gift of 300 pounds of gold instead (he was an intelligent one too).
Spain and England signed a peace in 1651 (England now had vast territories in Northern America and British Columbia). The Austrian-Russian war ended one year later (Austria gained some Albanian provinces). After the emotions had calmed down another 3 years, the Treaty of Tordesillas was officially cancelled by the Pope (no one cared about it anymore), and religious tensions lessened all over Europe.

savoycalifornia.jpg

New West Savoy

The Duke soon realized that administrating his worldwide realm was more, than a single man could handle - he started promoting ducal governors in 1655. The Aztec Empire declared war on us in the same year, but they proved to be no challenge for our disciplined troops (they would pay 600 pounds of gold to live in peace 3 years later).
The next ten years were a time of peace all over Europe. From time to time, the Duke had to care about corrupt official, boundary disputes, mysterious epidemics in the colonies and many other little disturbances.
In 1669 France declared war on Burgundy. The war was short, and left France in possession of Bourgogne after only 15 months of fighting. Again, Lorraine refused to become our vassals (and again they sent a gift instead).
The reign of Charle Emmanuel ended, like it had begun. After chartering a new university in Lyon (and granting it special rights), the nobility demanded the same old rights for itself in 1670. The Duke refused, causing severe unrest in the realm. After refusing the restoration of these rights again in 1671, civil war seemed inevitable. But the swift execution of some troublemakers intimidated the nobles, and in the end they accepted the Duke’s decision.

Charle Emmanuel died in peace in 1675. Victor Amedee II was crowned Duke of Greater Savoy on the 16th of June. After he had visited our allies in France and Lorraine several weeks later, Savoy had two new vassals.
 

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First Lieutenant
Apr 11, 2005
237
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jwolf:
I fear, the green nations are still there. I promise to make the situation better the next time :) .
Don't worry about excellent minsiters. In the last MP game (playing Portugal) I got my first exceptional year in 1750. Instead I had "corruption" three times until 1470, and a fire destroyed my naval manufactory in 1490... .

Mike von Bek:
I hope to control Italy in 1720; as soon as I get a CB against Siciliy or the Pope I'll use it. Don't know what to do with Venice at the moment.

Lurken:
Spain and Austria have bad relations at the moment (some country called Savoy convinced them to dishonor alliances and declare war on each other). Hope this won't change in the near future. After I got Vendee from Spain I don't care for them anyway.