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Second Lieutenant
Feb 16, 2006
186
0
Prologue


Gjergj Kastrioti. . . Skanderbeg. The Dragon of Albania

Where would I begin this tale? Alas, where would I end my tale?
He was my older brother. My only brother. One year seperated us, he always seemed, however, an age older than me in his wisdom, experience and his counselling.
He carried me through much of my life. From the day we were taken by the Turks after our fathers submission, till the day we, together with 300 other brave souls, betrayed the Turkish Sultan. Till the day 150.000 Turks led by Mehmed II laid waste to the Albanian countryside.
Even through his darkest hour after Barat did I look to him and he answered my questions.

I have decided to write this tale of his epic life as I have a golden opportunity to write about a man, my own brother, who will most likely be remembered throughout the ages for his courage and actions.
I will frequently appear as well, however pale and meaningless my life may seem in comparison to my brother. I am not sad of this fact, though, not many men deserve to be called his equal, let alone me.

A simple servant and brother of God's hand on Earth, Afrim Kastrioti

---------------------------------------------------------


In real life Skanderbeg had 3 brothers, for simplicitys sake he will only have one in this story.

The story will be told by Skanderbegs yonger brother Afrim Kastrioti, whos name and age is entirely fictional as there is not much information on his brothers.

It will also be told in dialogue, kinda like Amric's Byzantine Khan, which has been of great inspiration to me.

This is the first time I've ever done an AAR, let alone tried writing something that was over 10 pages.
Updates will most likely not be very frequent (they probably won't be very long either) as I am not a very dedicated person and I also have school to attend as well as a girlfriend that wants attention. I will do my best to finish this, however.

One more thing, do not hesitate to correct my grammar. I am no native speaker of english and I am always trying to better my skills with the language.

Anyway, that was the prologue. Chapter 1 will follow shortly.

And comments. by the way, will of course be welcomed.

-TGD

EDIT: I see I posted in the wrong section. Could a mod please move it over to where it belongs. Thanks :)
 
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unmerged(54020)

Second Lieutenant
Feb 16, 2006
186
0
Chapter 1

The Albanian Dragon
Chapter 1
Afrim Kastrioti
Military Academy of Edirne​

When I think back at our time at the military academy of Edirne especially one day and one class springs to mind. Ferhat, our favorite teachers, was telling us of ancient history. Why was he our favorite? I think the reason may simple as he was the only teacher that had never struck any of the students. He said violence against the weak was not honorable, this day, however he told us another story.
He told us about King Pyrrhus of Epirus. A man who had defeated the great Romans, not once, but twice, before he finally had to succumb to their legions.
I looked at Gjergj during the class. His eyes were shining when Ferhat said that Epirus was situated exactly where Albania lies today. He bursted out, ”one day I will become a great general, liberate the Albanian people and conquer nations like Pyrrhus and Alexander the Great!” I beleived him.
Had it been any other teacher than Ferhat Gjergj would have been punished, perhaps with a beating or with the whip. But Ferhat knew that Gjergj was indifferent towards this. All the other teachers hate him. They call him a troublemaker and a dreamer. Ferhat only smiled, however, and only said, ”perhaps.” then he winked and continued with his class as if nothing had happened.

Later, right after dinner and the last ride of the day, we were instructed to go to our barracks and sleep. Gjergj, however silently called my name and frantically waved me over to him. I looked around and ran as a sneaky fox over to him. No one saw our little escape from the group.
What was he up to now, I thought to myself.
He frowned and asked me to follow him and so I did.
We crawled over the fence that surrounds the barracks in this part of the academy and fell flat on our stomachs as soon as we were over.
My heart pounded with excitement, but not once did I think over the situation. I trusted my brother and I had, as I would later find out, laid my next 10 rations of decent food in his hands. A good beating would also await us if we had been discovered at the place we were heading for.
We continued forward, Gjergj constantly holding a hand across my chest in order to stop me in time should a guard cross our path. We hurried along the walls of a barrack intended for Serbian students, or prisoners, as some, including myself, would say.
Gjergj peeked around the corner where two Turkish guards were talking. For a second I lost hope, and I whispered in Gjergjs ear that I wanted to go back and try again later.
He cheered me up, however, with his words, ”Afrim, they are only two. Just like us. We'll get past them. Trust me.”
And trust him I did, for the next second we were sprinting across the small yard. One of the guards turned his head, had he done this just a second sooner my brother and I would have been discovered. But God protected us that moment.
We hurried along another set of barracks and a small fold with young horses before we arrived at the designated location: The food chamber intended for the Turkish officers.
I choked a laugh and Ghergj smiled at me and said I had to be quiet. The guards might be few and inattentive, but he did not wish to be discovered so close to our target.
We crawled under the rotten wood walls of the food chamber and slipped in as two small mice looking for food in the winter.
When inside, Gjergj took a litten lamp from a table at the center of the room.
Around us we had located paradise, or so it seemed. Mountains of fine cheese, roasted beef, bread that wasn't filled with maggots and water that was fresh and needn't be mixed with wine to hide the rotten taste.
We filled our stomachs in a heartbeat and also filled two bags, one for each, with bread, cheese, salt, meat and butter.
We rushed back to our barrack the same way we had come in what seemed less than ten seconds.
Inside the barrack there were eight other students, all Albanian. We had been taken from Krujë by the Turks the very same day and had all gone through the same pain of not knowing what had become of our parents or the rest of our family.
A brotherhood existed between us all and they feared we had been taken away, never to be seen again. Such stories flickered around the Academy, but Gjergj said that the stories were made by the Turkish officers to keep the students in line. To prevent two young boys from doing what my brother and I had did today.
Gjergj was the leader of this small pack, and he knew it. See, already as a child he enjoyed the respect of others. Not only because of his physical size, but because of his mind and courage that he had shown ever since he was he was born from our mothers womb.
To get back to the feast we had at hand that dark winter night, the eight other boys almost cheered in joy as they saw the delights we had returned with.
The food was shared equally among the group and we were bestowed with glory as if we were rulers of Albania and had just defeated the Turk, or as if we had freed Jerusalem from the infidel!
There was little sleep to be had that night, but it did not matter, for it was the best meal we had had in years.

Each boy had hid a piece of meat or cheese under his small pillow of straw to save it for worse times.
The following morning the nightly burglary in the officers food chamber had been discovered.
With no chance of knowing who the perpetrators were, all students would have no food that day and all classes would be cancelled; replaced by a day long run with no water at all.
Gjergj took the decision to turn himself in, I begged him not to as they would surely kill him, I thought. He said nothing except that he would handle it and that he did not wish for the entire camp to suffer because of his foolishness.
He reported himself to the officer designated to the Albanian sector of the academy. I feared the outcome.
Some 15 minutes later he returned with a big smile on his face.
The Turkish officer, whose name was Kemal, said that he would ignore it as a severe degradation would await him, and possibly even execution. Gjergj, however, was not satisfied and now had the upper-hand.
Kemal, who apparently had something on the commander-in-chief rushed over to the biggest building in the academy. The commanders villa, who also held the rank of governor, bey, without the usual responsibilities that such a position had.
What happened between Kemal and Murad, the commander, we will never know. But some effect it had indeed as the punishment was blown off and all students returned to their ordinary classes of the day.
Gjergj had saved the whole camp from severe punishment by a strange string of lucky events.
Fortuna was with Gjergj that day.
I will end my tale of our stay at the Military Academy here as one may find numerous other texts regarding this matter. My intentions for this book is to reflect upon my brothers life. His stay at the Academy did, I must stress, form Gjergj into the man he became in many ways.
It was here he learned about military doctrines and of the great kings of the past and many of his achievements would not have been possible without this period in his life.

A simple servant and brother of God's hand on Earth, Afrim Kastrioti
 
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Saulta

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Excellent writing, and it certainly is an interesting nation.

I´ll be following this for sure :)

Saulta
 

unmerged(54020)

Second Lieutenant
Feb 16, 2006
186
0
Saulta - Thanks. It is a very interesting faction with a very interesting and intruiging history. Quite challenging as well, I should say.

Almost finished Chapter 2, but it became way longer than I had intended so it's being split up. Part 1 will be posted within a few hours.

EDIT: Part 1 of chapter 2 is now up.

-TGD
 
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unmerged(54020)

Second Lieutenant
Feb 16, 2006
186
0
The Albanian Dragon
Chapter 2, part 1
Afrim Kastrioti
In Ottoman Service, The Serbian War


When we ”graduated” from the Academy at Edirne Gjergj was given the name Iskander, a name that would soon be known in the entire Sultanate and thus he would be granted the title of Arnavutlu İskender Bey, Lord Alexander the Albanian. I will refer to my brother as Gjergj during this tale at all times, unless circumstances force me to use one of his many cognomens, though.
Both of us, together with 6 other Albanian boys (two of the boys had died at the Academy due to hypothermia after being lost on a patrol exercise), took an oath to serve the Sultan to our deaths and embraced Islam. We were still Christian in our hearts, servants of God, however.

Both of us were assigned to the Ceemat, frontier troops, in the 21st orta, regiment.
A mounted regiment specified for those who are extremely good on a horseback. I'm proud to say that I was an even better rider than my brother, I was even one of the best at the entire Academy and possibly the whole army. That is not saying that Gjergj wasn't good either, in fact he was brilliant, but I do hold pride in the fact that there was one thing I could beat him in.
We were stationed at the Serbian border in the 1st army, directly under the command of Sultan Murad II, 20 and 21 years of age respectively.
Murad was a man to admire and my brother learned much from him, as did I.
He was planning to conquer Serbia, but the Hungarians had proclaimed a guarantee for the indepence of this small kingdom. So the Sultan hesitated, and what a fortune that was for him.
For in 1426 the Hussites in Bohemia were at the peak of their power and conquest. The romanist Bohemia was on their heels, the Arcduke of Austria was beaten and had converted to the heretic faith of the Hussitetes. As Emperor of the Holy Roman Kingdom, King Sigismund of Hungary and Bohemia had to divert all of his focus and military might towards this major threat.
So Murad II attacked with 30000 men.
He moved on Ras, the biggest city of Kosovo, a province under Serbian domain and laid siege to the city. The Serbian army had vanished however. Frustrated, as he wanted to end the war swiftly with a single major battle that would surely break all Serbian resistance, he ordered parts of the 21st orta, 40 men in total, to locate the Serbian army. My brothers was given command of the contignent as he had received great recommendations from another Murad, the aforementioned leader of the Military Academy.
He split the contingent in two groups of 20 men, the other being led by a 26 year old Greek named Agapetos. The orders were to return after 6 days to report to the Sultan.
We rode the hillsides for 4 days without seeing anything that resembled anything of an inhabited nation. The country had been abandoned. Several villages we crossed, all were burning or had already been burned.
As we could tell from the traces in the ground, the Serbian army had sweeped the area and driven their own population out of their homes. The Turkish invaders would receive no help from the local population, and even if I felt sympatic for the Serbians as they had done nothing other than being in the way, I could not help but feel sorry for the people. It wasn't their fault that we had invaded, why would the Serbian king punish them like this I asked my brother.
He told me it was deliberate and that the population did it voluntarily. They loved their homes too much to let it be used by the Turks. They would rather burn them and return afterwards than provide us with any shelter.
He said to me, ”brother, I fear this will be a long war with many casualties. They will harass the main army and avoid greater confrontations. The loss of life will be plentiful for the Sultan is no merciful man, and he will try to anger the Serbs so immensely to make them throw themselves into a battle that they will lose no matter what. The Serbs are doomed my friend. Let us spare the populace from much suffering and locate this damn army of theirs, the outcome is certain anyways and we are soldiers of the Sultan.”
He silently rode passed me and I followed in right behind him. I knew my brother was right, but it was hard to hear the facts from another persons mouth.

The next morning was beautiful. The sky was blue in all of its entity and there were trees as far as we could see and the mountains rose majestically around us. Even though I had been taken young, the area reminded me of Albania, my homeland.
How easy would it not have been to have turned the horse in that moment and turned home? But something kept me, I still don't know what till this day, and I think of the morning every night. What kept me there? A lust for blood perhaps, a lust to be part of something greater than me, even if I didn't agree with the cause. Fear, perhaps. Fear of Murad's revenge.
But the story must go on, for after a few hours we spotted a trail that had recently been used by a large number of men who had obviously marched in formation. There were no signs of carts, either, so we were sure that parts of the Serbian army had moved through here. And how right we were.
We all heard it. The sounds of hooves trampling on a mountain side. Gjergj ordered us to stop, but none of us had any idea where it came from. My heart pounded, were we being watched? Was doom awaiting us the very next moment?
Gjergj dropped of his horse and walked to the side of the mountain, he put his ear on the ground and all of the group were silently watching him. He peeked over the side and waved me over. I sneaked, as I had done that day at the Academy and looked over the side.
100 meters below us, almost vertically, a group of Serbian riders, numbering 15 men, were resting while the horses grassed nearby them.
There was no way we could get down the slope with the horses, so Gjergj ordered us to tie the horses to some tries further down the trail we had been following. We removed our breastplates and the rest of our armour, We would have to be silent if we were to surprise the Serbians.
He said to the group in low tone, ”Afrim, you will take nine men” and he pointed at the nine he wanted to follow me, ”down here to the left. Make sure you are unnoticed, fall in on them from behind their horses, they should be able to cover you the last part of the way. Attack when my group has engaged the enemy. The rest of you will follow me directly down above them. Spread out and follow me when I order the charge. We outnumber them, so even if they discover us our chances are good. And remember, try and capture one alive I want a prisoner that I can interrogate, but only do it if the chance is there. I don't want you to be killed because you do finish off one of them. Now let's go!”
I rushed silently to the point where Gjergj had ordered me and my small group. We climbed down the steep mountain side and the adrenaline rushed through my veins. I thought we would be discovered as my heart seemed to pound harder than a pair of marching drums.
We were not discovered however, and soon we were down at the small water stream where the horses were drinking. They did not take much notice of us and we were able to come very close. I peeked over one of them and saw my brother walking, almost flying as a ghost, down the slope. He held his hand up and ordered the group to stop and then he looked towards my position. He spotted me and I could see his white teeth as he smiled to me.
With a thundering voice, that even shook the horses, he screamed: ”charge!”
The small Serbian camp was quickly chaos as soldiers ran around in an effort to gather their weapons and array themselves in something that could look like a fighting formation. I decided to charge now, even though my brother had told me to wait until they were in full contact.
The effect was immense, a couple of the Serbs who had turned their tails and ran for the horses were shocked to see this new threat from their flank. We were over them in a second, cutting down the 4 that had tried to rout. I continued forward and plunged my sword into the side of a shocked and confusing Serbian. He screamed and slashed me across the face with his shield. I felt no pain from it, however, and stabbed him in his thigh and in his heart. I continued forward but the fighting had already stopped, 4 Serbians were begging for mercy and Gjergj, who was covered in blood from 3 enemies he had killed, ordered them tied up.
The Serbian horses were shocked and disturbed by this sudden chaos and were stamping in the ground and blowing the air hard out of their nostrils.
Gjergj send two men further down the new trail, and 30 minutes later they stood right over us yelling that the two trails met further ahead.
We spent the next 3 hours digging 12 graves, one of them meant for our only casualty, an Albanian named Albin who was on his first mission. The last 11 for our slain enemies, whom we perhaps were at war with, but still managed to show this last respect.
Gjergj held a short speech, complementing their courage and asking for their forgiveness before God.

2 days later we were back at camp with 15 new horses, a multitude of weapons and other various spoils of war. The money the Serbians had carried were equally shared among the 19 men group.
Gjergj was called to the command tent of the 21st orta as the commander, an old major named Özer, wanted to know what had happened to the rest of the group. Gjergj said he did not know, as they had split up a few hours after being send out. Gjergj explained how we had lost contact with them and that he had decided to continue his search for the Serbians, rather than worry about Agapetos' group which he assumed was just fine. Agapetos, however, had never returned to the camp and nor had any of the men following him. They never returned. They were almost certainly attacked and killed or taken prisoner by the Serbs. But it was not uncommon for patrols never to return during this war.
Three days after we had returned to Ras where much of the Ottoman army was assembled to siege the city, we moved north. Apparently, one of the 4 prisoners had told the location of the Serbian army and scouts had confirmed the location the following day.
5 days later we reached the Danube and were only 3 days march from the Serbian army.
We had had several small skirmishes with Serbian troops who constantly harassed the army at vulnerable points. Murad, however, was determined to decide the war within the week.
After three uneventful days, except for the usual sporadic attacks that had vained in strength recently, the whole Serbian army was once again spotted. They were marching towards Smederevo, the Serbian capital, most likely in order to make a last stand.
The roles had now turned and Murad ordered several cavalry regiment, not the 21st, though, to harass and attack the rear of the Serbian army that numbered some 8000 men on foot and 4000 on horse.
Compared to the 30000 battle hardened men of Murad II, of which 12000 were mounted. Stepan Lazar II's army seemed like a small bug ready to be crushed as they lined up in battle formation on that plain before Smederevo. . .

A simple servant and brother of God's hand on Earth, Afrim Kastrioti
 
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unmerged(54020)

Second Lieutenant
Feb 16, 2006
186
0
I just realised how long that part of the chapter was. . .

Looks like big scary blob of text. Should I make it shorter or leave it as it is? I don't want to scare off new readers by that myriad of text.

-TGD
 

Emperor_krk

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Just read 1st and half of 2nd part (too tired today - will finish tomorrow certainly), and I'm veeery satisfied :). I too think Albania in the time of Skanderbeg is fascinating... And your writing is clear and, well, interesting, thumbs up:).
I would just divide it into short paragraphs, like this:
Both of us were assigned to the Ceemat, frontier troops, in the 21st orta, regiment. A mounted regiment specified for those who are extremly good on a horseback. I'm proud to say that I was an even better rider than my brother, I was even one of the best at the entire Academy and possibly the whole army. That is not saying taht Gjergj wasn't good either, in fact he was brilliant, but I do hold pride in the fact that there was one thing I could beat him in. [hit ENTER here]

We were stationed at the Serbian border in the 1st army, directly under the command of Sultan Murad II, 20 and 21 years of age respectively.
Murad was a man to admire and my brother learned much from him, as did I.
He was planning to conquer Serbia, but the Hungarians had proclaimed a guarantee for the indepence of this small kingdom. So the Sultan hesitated, and what a fortune that was for him. For in 1426 the Hussites in Bohemia were at the peak of their power and conquest. [hit ENTER here]

The romanist Bohemia was on their heels, the Arcduke of Austria was beaten and had converted to the heretic faith of the Hussitetes. As Emperor of the Holy Roman Kingdom, King Sigismund of Hungary and Bohemia had to divert all of his focus and military might towards this major threat.
So Murad II attacked with 30000 men.
Or something in that manner, it would become a bit more readable ;). At least, for me :).
 

Saulta

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This is a great story, :D
 

Duke of Wellington

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Very good chapter you right well. Have you much experience?

With regards to the amount of text I do not think it too much to ease readabilty but Emperor_krk's suggestion is a good one. Also might I suggest checking for typos and such they ease reading a bit and improve the presentation. Do you use Firefox?
 

unmerged(54020)

Second Lieutenant
Feb 16, 2006
186
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Emperor-krk - I will think about that.

Saulta - Thank you.

DoW - Much experience? Hardly, I'm writing this to get some of it.
And I am quite aware of my typos, but I just can't find them on a screen. I need it in paper. I use firefox and I've heard people talk about something that corrects your typos, I would appreciate a link very much. And english isn't my first language so some of the typos are because of that. I'm still a student of the language ;)

-TGD
 

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Just finished reading. Like I said before, you made it an interesting story, congratulations :)!!!
Eagerly waiting for the the next update :).
 

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Second Lieutenant
Feb 16, 2006
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Duke - Thank you, I figured it out. And well, I did ace my exams so I guess I'm fairly good.

krk - Thanks again. Apreaciate your comments.

And part 2 is finished, but it also became way longer than I wanted so I'm cutting it down before posting. Expect it within a few hours.

-TGD
 
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Saulta

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Can´t wait, this is just to good.

Saulta
 

unmerged(54020)

Second Lieutenant
Feb 16, 2006
186
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The Albanian Dragon
Chapter 2, part 2
Afrim Kastrioti
In Ottoman Service, The Serbian War​

On the 22nd day of June the battle for Smeredevo took place. It was the first major battle my brother participated in, and for the matter, my first battle as well.
The king of the Serbs realised he was unable to escape from the Ottoman army. That is not to say, that he couldn't physically have outpaced us, but he would have left his capital, the biggest city and most populated city of his realm unguarded.
Murad II made no signs of hiding his intentions regarding the city should the Serbian king fail to deliver him battle today. He would burn it to the ground, kill the men and enslave the women and children, he would cover the ground in salt, thus rendering the fertile land useless for generations to come. Faced with this, and because a big part of his army was from this very area and refused to follow him should he run from the Ottomans this day, he offered battle on the Smeredevo plain even though the Serbs were outnumbered almost 3:1 and faced one of the most brilliant commanders of the world.

The Serbian king arrayed his forces in a typical way. His heaviest and fiercest cavalry in front of the center, a thousand armoured knights in total.
The infantry, mostly farmers and city dwellers with simple spears and axes were placed behind the his formidable heavy cavalry. As the Sultan and many of his generals noted, the infantry was more tightly packed in the center than at the flanks. That added up with the presence of heavy cavalry at the front suggested that the Serbian king wanted to break the Ottoman center and take down each flank with fearsome cavalry charges once they have gotten behind Ottoman lines.
On the Serbian flanks he had deployed parts of his light cavalry, horse archers and mounted skirmishers armed with javelins mostly, while some thousand cavalry were being held at the back of his formation.

Murad II arrayed his forces with his strongest infantry, the elite Janissary's at the center. Armed with long pikes they reminded me of the phalanxes of Alexander the Great. He knew, that if the heavy cavalry attack that was expected was carried out it would be stopped in a heartbeat.
On his right he deployed most of the cavalry, including 21st orta. Here he hoped, should the center fail to stop the cavalry, that another extremely huge cavalry charge would destroy the rabble that was the Serbian infantry forces.
Behind the janissaries Murad had placed more than 4000 archers, they too, he suggested, would be enough to stop the cavalry and inflict huge damage upon the Serbs.
On the left flank, protected by his favourite janissary regiments were the jewels of his army.
10 huge golden cannons that had been dragged through the mountains by 20 horses each.
I had seen them being fired in a demonstration that Murad II held for the entire army. He was like a child, enthusiastically showing off his new toy. Murad was proud of his 'babies' as he called them. He fired them onto the wall of an abandoned castle wall and they were torn to pieces by the exploding fireballs.

The Serbs put their entire force, except for a thousand archers who were send back to the city to cover any possible retreats, into motion soon after the Ottomans had formed up.
They plunged forward in desperation and Murad II fired his cannons even though the Serbs were way out of range for his cannons, just to show them what a menace they were up against.
Even though the cannonballs did not hit the Serb army their men halted and officers started screaming to them that they must continue.

Murad II ordered the army forward and unleashed the 4000 archers and slaughtered the remaining Serb archers that were left and wreaked havoc among the mainly unarmoured Serbian lines.
Stepan Lazar, the king of Serbia, desperate and not willing to allow the Ottomans to whittle down his troops ordered his cavalry forward. Murad, in turn, moved the large cavalry force on the right forward to smack into the heavy cavalry's flank once they had engaged the janissaries in the center.

This, however, Stepan countered by ordering his remaining cavalry to attack the huge Ottoman cavalry force on the right which I was a part of.
Murad then split the great body of cavalry in two and had them move away from each other. The Serbs thereby were forced to split up their attack and it greatly reduced the effect.
The 21st orta was being held in the back, away from the action. From our position we could see how the thousand heavy Serb riders plunged in to the center which was buckling under the pressure. The pikes had not done much to stop the attack as the line had not been consistent enough.
Most of the Serb infantry had followed suit and fought the Ottomans side to side with their cavalry.
The screams of men and horses and clash of swords and spears against shields and human flesh was quite clear even at our position, several hundred meters away from any of the fighting.

”Look, he is surrounding them. The Janissaries are pulling back slowly, they aren't under much pressure. It's a classical tactic.” my brother said to me and looked up in the sky.
I replied him, ”Yes. Hannibal's tactic at Cannae.”
He laughed. ”The Serbian king is a fool. He should never have offered battle in the first place.”

A runner then approached Özer, the commander of the orta, and gave him a message.
The runner turned around and headed back to where the generals and commanders of the army were placed.
Özer roared, ”it's us now, lads. We will charge those rats who are fighting our center. You know your positions. Follow me!”

My brother and I were in the center of the long line of 6 cavalry ortas who slowly moved forward against the Serb army. 6 other ortas were approaching them from the other flank.
A trumpet sounded and the whole formation slowly got their horses into full gallop.
Some Serbs, terrorized by the fearsome sight it must've been, fled. Others, who were brave enough to stand down firmed their grips on their spears and shields to brace them for the upcoming charge.

In almost complete synchronization all men lowered their lances and the officers raised their slightly curved swords in the air.
Suddenly, even though the sound of thundering hooves around us deafened almost everything, I could hear myself roar like thousands other.
I randomly picked out a Serb and aimed my lance at him. We looked each other in the eyes and I could see fear shining out of them. I pushed my horse forward and I hit the Serb, who was surprised by this sudden explosion of speed from the horse, right in his open mouth. The lance went through his neck and released his head from his body in an explosion of blood that covered most of the front of my horse.
I threw the lance in shock and drew my sword. Two men were nearing me and my brother whom I was still besides. He plunged forward killing them both in an instant and displayed his brilliant skills with his weapon.

I do not remember the details of the part I took in the battle as I was in a frenzy of murder and blood.
But I do, however, remember the massive effect of our charge. The Serbian army crumbled and the serbs found themselves running for their lifes against their capital.
The slaughter was immense as Murad wanted to end the war fast, as I've already pointed out.
The king of the Serbs was caught and forced to cede the province of Kosovo and swear allegiance to the Sultan.
And thus ended the Serbian War after only 2 months.

A simple servant and brother of God's hand on Earth, Afrim Kastrioti



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Was bored so I finished the chapter.

Saulta - That's what I like to hear :D

Deo89 - Glad to have you aboard. I hope you will enjoy the AAR.

-TGD
 
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