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Jul 31, 2005
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Swiss Neutrality . . . ? (WC)

Hello there Vicky forum!

Long time reader. I was inspired by Memnon's fabulous Egypt AAR. Just had to write one of my own and hopefully do half as well as Memnon did in that game.

I've played for quite a while, off and on. Started playing when patch 1.01 came out I think.

As the title suggests, I will be writing a Swiss AAR.

Difficulty is normal.

Start date: 1836.

Vanilla 1.03c. This was my first time playing 1.03c and I must say there were a number of _very_ welcome surprises. Thank you very much Paradox! I eagerly await 1.04.

And we are off.

PS: I will try to provide lots of screenshots. I love screenshots.
 
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Switzerland 1836-1855: Research and Development

In 1836, the Swiss government voted to reform the government and create the Patriciate. 12 leading citizens were elected to form the first Patriciate. This ruling council was given complete control of the state. Each member of the council served until their death or abdication. A simple majority was all that was required to pass any legislation, except that dealing with a change in this new Swiss constitution.

The first 12 members of the Patriciate were wise and knowledgable men. They set an example that sustained Switzerland for some time to come.

The new Patriciate quickly proved it's worth. Trade and industry flourished. Taxes were kept reasonable. The army was kept small, but was well trained. Education was particularly well funded, reflecting the Patriciate's belief that knowledge and wisdom were the twin keys to happiness. The Patriciate ruled well, and in 1846, after a decade of rule, the Swiss people held a gigantic parade in honor of their now beloved Patriciate.

The Patriciate strived for peace and prosperity, and in the early years of it's reign, it provided just that.


...

I didn't get the idea to write this AAR until a few years ago, so I must apologize for my lack of screenies between 1836 and 1855.

No real loss though, as 1836 to 1855 were pretty boring. I think I had the game on Fastest the entire time.

As the title suggests, my primary aims in these years were Research and Development.

As a general rule, I do not like to colonize much. I'm never too worried about prestige and would generally prefer to focus my time and effort on industrialization. Prestige is helpful, but I really prefer total military and industrial domination.

Some suggest Belgium as the ideal newbie country. But I suspect Switzerland is actually quite a bit better. For one, you don't begin the game in a war, which would be very helpful for a pure newbie. Also, it is perfectly possible to remain neutral throughout the entire game. A perfect sandbox, along with a perfect spot to view the European theatre. If not for the beginning war, I suppose Belgium would be just as good.

With that in mind, the first 20 years were spent in near perfect political isolation. No one bothered me, and I bothered no one.

Except for tech trading, which I was surprised to find Switzerland absolutely excels at. They begin with I believe 70% literacy and from almost day 1, with full education spending, the Swiss manage to produce more Research Points than they could possibly use. After getting almost everyone into a factory and maximizing my number of Clerks in the usual manner (ie using small POPs for Craftsmen and large POPs for Clerks), I was positively swimming in Research Points.

You also are blessed with good relations with all the little German minors and Belgium, and thus, while researching your way up the industrial tree, you can also trade for quite a few army, naval, and commercial techs. I try to avoid trading with the major powers, as I don't want them to get too technologically advanced.

I trade techs for techs, as money was a little scarce. To minimize problems later on, I tried to spread around my trades, so no one other country got too much technology. I don't know if this actually works because I don't know if the AI-controlled countries trade technology among themselves. Still, it seems to give me quite a large technological advantage rather early on.

So that was how I played the first 20 years.

Next post (coming up right now): Screenies!
 
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Switzerland 1855: State of the Nation

The state of the nation as of 1855:



The budget holds no surprises. The "normal" early game peacetime configuration.



I have made good progress towards industrialization. Almost everyone is in a factory:



As you can see, steel and clothing are my principle factories.

Of course, as Switzerland of ALL countries I get polyopoly! All my provinces are in one state and I cannot colonize because I have no oceanic borders! And I get polyopoly! Victoria has a sick sense of humor sometimes. I remember one time when I was playing as Russia, I got monopoly *grumble grumble*

But I digress.

As you can see from the screenies, Switzerland is relatively prosperous and relatively wealthy even at this early stage. Things are looking up.

Safe in their homes, the Swiss are leading happy, peaceful lives.

But how long can this paradise of peace and enlightenment exist in this rough, imperialistic world? Switzerland's neighbors are impoverished. They can't help but feel envious of such a small nation with so much wealth.

But no one would dare violate Swiss neutrality...

...would they?
 
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Rensslaer

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Primus,

I have to admit that, as a child of the Cold War, my map reading eye often skips entirely over little, "neutral" Switzerland. I mean, from the Cold War to HOI to Vicky, military strategies usually assume Switzerland as an obstacle or a defensive wall. When I thought back, I couldn't even recall seeing Switzerland in my games!

I'll look forward to allowing you to bring "the doughnut hole of Europe" to my attention!

Rensslaer
 

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Jul 31, 2005
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Switzerland 1855-1865: Secret Envoys and Wise Patricians

The now distinguished and revered Patriciate now entered their third decade of rule. They remained committed to the twin goals of any good republic: economic welfare and education.

However, in 1855, their attention was drawn away from domestic matters. An envoy from the Italians living in the Northern Italian province of Bergamo came before the Patriciate. On the border of Switzerland, the people of Bergamo had watched the rising prosperity of the Swiss firsthand. They yearned to be free of the Austrian yoke that had surpressed them for so long.

The Patriciate, being composed of kind and benevolent souls, was deeply troubled. They dispatched a few of their own to tour Bergamo and examine the province firsthand.

When these members returned, the full council of 12 was once again assembled. They members who had gone to Bergamo reported their findings, and all of the Patriciate were stunned by the conditions in which the Northern Italians lived. The people of Bergamo were a lively, industrious lot, and their land was some of the finest in Europe. But primarily due to Austrian mismanagement, many of the good natured Italians were forced to live in squalor.

The situation was presented to the diplomats, the academics, the bankers, and the military. With their guidance, the Patriciate decided upon a plan of action.

Troops were called up and began training. The academic establishment began ferverent research into new military techonology. The diplomats negotiated for new technology with other nations.

The Swiss bankers quickly developed a plan for immediate relief. They proposed that the Patriciate negotiate with the Austrians for stewardship of Bergamo. In exchange for Bergamo, the Swiss would provide money and technology so that Austria might provide relief for it's other provinces.

Good relations with Austria were pursued, and after long negotiations, the people of Bergamo were finally freed.

The Swiss quickly provided economic relief and development. Bergamo grew and prospered. Other Northern Italian provinces looked on with envy and soon sent delegations of their own to plead for Swiss stewardship.

The bankers saved and the diplomats brought new technology to Switzerland. After more intense negotiations, the Patriciate secured freedom for two more Italian provinces.



The now prosperous Northern Italians loved Swiss democratic rule and soon flocked to the army in record numbers.

Switzerland became an undisputed Great Power. The Patriciate ruled over their now diverse population with justice and kindness.


...

Infrastructure:



White is Integrated Rail. (Rank 5. Highest Rank.)

Science:



As you can see, tech trading has been good for Switzerland. =D

...

The year 1865 would prove to be a fateful year in the history of Switzerland, nay, in the history of the world.

Austria launched a vicious attack on her former Prussian allies. Through deceit and bribery, all of Prussia's allies turned against her in her time of need. Together with nearly all the German minors, Prussia was beset by enemies on all sides.

The Prussians had long been friends of the Swiss people, and the Patricians were dismayed by this blatant act of Austrian aggression.

In 1865 however, a secret envoy arrived that forced the Patriciate to make a difficult choice:




The Patricians were at first dismayed by this proposition. How could they justify spending Swiss blood to intervene in a German civil war?

However, just days after learning of the alliance offered by the Prussians, a group of Northern Italians came and requested an audience. They reminded the Patricians of the horrors they had been subjected to under Austrian rule. They begged for intervention to save their Northern Italian brothers and sisters still under Austrian rule.

The Patricians were wavering now, their love of peace conflicting with their sense of justice.

After much reflection, they renounced their beloved neutrality and pledged aid to the Prussians. Hopefully Switzerland and Prussia could force Austria to a stalemate and prevent the spread of Austrian oppression.

In December of 1865, Switzerland entered a military alliance with Prussia. 15 Swiss divisions were reinforced and deployed.



The Patriciate was worried, but filled with resolve. They trusted in the courage of their Swiss countrymen, but would it be enough to withstand the vicious Austrian hordes? Or would Switzerland be defeated, the Patriciate deposed, and the proud Swiss peoples subjected to Austrian oppression?
 

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weychun said:
Swiss national day 1st Aug, coincidence isn't it
perhaps only the author knows. that said, KOOL !


AWESOME start ! ! ! :cool:


subscribes
 

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Switzerland 1865-1868: Switzerland v Austria

The German minors and Austria were caught completely unaware by the Swiss invasion. Needless to say, the sudden appearance of 160,000 men on a new front brought no little joy to the Prussians and no little worry to the Austrians.

The Swiss leapt towards the German minors, intent on knocking them out of the war early and hopefully leaving them open to later annexation. This strategy proved to be a stunning success. All the German minors caved to the Swiss, trading vast tracts of land for peace.

The Swiss troops quickly regrouped and fell upon Austria.

The Austrians pulled back from the Prussian border and focused almost all their attention on the Swiss. However, the Prussian military was impotent and could take no advantage of the situation. Switzerland had to face the bulk of the Austrian army alone.

It is impossible to say exactly how bad the situation looked for the Swiss, but the Austrians seemed to outnumber the Swiss 2 to 1.

The situation was further frustrated by the lack of Swiss officers. Ammunition, crucial for training officers, was impossible to obtain, by industry or otherwise. The valiant Swiss troops were left to fight with uneducated men leading them.

All was not lost however. Through a series of incredibly brave and incredibly dangerous manuevers, much of western Austria was taken and the Swiss created a stalemate through clever use of entrenchments and mountainous terrain.

The Austrians, frustrated by their inability to make any sort of advance on the Swiss, soon sued for peace. Switzerland only gained a few provinces, but the war was still hailed an unbridled success. The Austrian military had been devastated and was unlikely to resume their assault any time soon.

The Patriciates declared a week of celebration, vast new expanses of railroads to be built, and a complete reduction in military expenses.

State of the Nation:



Infrastructure:

 

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Switzerland 1868-1873: European Cry for Liberation

After the end of the first Austro-Swiss war, Switzerland experienced rapid development. Railroads and industry spread throughout the newly conquered territory. The war chest continued to grow, even as more and more men flocked to join the glorious Swiss armies.

In 1870, Prussia was still at war with Austria with war exhaustion appraoching 100%. Switzerland regretted that their ally suffered so much, but the Patriciate felt that it had done enough. It was not powerful enough to provide for both the people of Prussia and its own people. Sadly, the Patricians stood by and watched as Prussian military impotence continued, and the Austrians won battle after battle. Had they not fought with Austria for nearly three years, giving the Prussians all the time they needed to launch a counterattack? That counterattack never came.

But in 1870, the Prussians, with more pride than brains, chose to declare war on France just as the Austrians neared Berlin.

They called on their Swiss allies to help them, and the Patriciate thought long and hard about what to do.

In the end, a secret envoy from the French people decided the Patricians. The French were living in oppression not unlike that suffered by the German peoples before their liberation.

Hating war but resolved to justice, the Swiss joined their Prussian allies and declared war on the French.

The utter impotence of the French military has been well documented throughout history, and we feel no need to elaborate on it here. The Swiss essentially walked to Paris and occupied it. A few shots were fired, but the French mostly broke at the first sight of the Swiss army. In less than a year, much of France was occupied.

However, the Prussians now realizing the danger they were in with the Austrians, started making peaceful overtures. Switzerland, unwilling to let all their war gains be given away by the Prussians who had done literally nothing versus the French, made a seperate peace and received a half dozen provinces in return.

As the troops returned from the front, a new secret envoy was received from the Italian peoples. Apparently, even native Italians rules their fellow countrymen badly. There was severe economic depression throughout the peninsula, not to mention the gross violation of human rights occuring daily.

The Patriciate directed their troops immediately southward, and prepared to liberate the rest of the Italian peoples.

A few last tech trades were made. The Swiss Patriciate, aware that it's actions would be seen with jealousy by the power hungry nations of the world, knew that the conquest of Italy would turn all nations against them, at least diplomatically. However, Switzerland was well on it's way to technological dominance and saw that it's own scientists could do the rest with ease. In the end, the liberation of oppressed people was deemed more important than quick technological advancement. Humanitarians throughout Switzerland praised the Patriciate for their selfless sacrifice.

Only token resistance was encountered as the Swiss army moved down the peninsula. The troops were hailed not as conquerors, but as liberators.

The campaigns of 1871 were a stunning success:



The gods smiled upon Switzerland, and the campaigns of 1872 and 1873 were also stunning successes:



In August of 1873, at the culmination of the wars, another week of celebration was declared, and the Patriciate began to build railroads to knit the vast empire together.



The Swiss Patriciate was now almost completely out of money and resolved itself to peace and the development of industry.

But for how long would the rest of the world tolerate this newly ascendant Switzerland? Would the traditional powers rise up to crush this new upstart, as they had been known to do before? The Patriciate took what comfort it could from the story of Frederick the Great, but fear was palpable in the Swiss capitol.
 

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Switzerland 1873-187 : Foolish Pride

For three years of peace and prosperity came to the Swiss peoples. Railroads were built and good relations were pursued with England.

In 1876 however, the Swiss army, eager for more liberation, declared itself ready for another major war.

Austria was chosen, as the peace treaty had just expired:



The end of the war came quickly, lasting only a few months. Switzerland grew by a small, but respectable, amount:



There was still a substantial amount of money left in the war chest, and the Swiss troops quickly moved towards France.

France, Sardinia-Piedmont, and Two Sicilies all had defensive alliances. Of course, the only thing to do was attack all three of them at once.

Little resistance was encountered. The French either got slaughtered or ran away. Paris was soon occupied. A seperate peace was pursued with each of the three nations.

The new boundaries of Switzerland after the war:



For the next six years, Switzerland digested their new lands, building factories and railroads. Also, the factory base of the original Swiss territories were refined and expanded so as to better finance future wars.

In 1883, the country had been brought up to speed and a substantial war chest had been accumulated. Thus, in 1883, war was again declared on Austria.



The battle-hardened Swiss troops annihilated any who stood in their way. The war was short and victory was sure.

Several minors were annexed and then peace was made with Austria on the following terms:



In commemoration of the victory, another week of celebration and feasting was declared by the Patriciate.
 

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Nice CB excuse .. "they're oppressed and we must liberate them" :D
 

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Primus Inter Pa said:
In commemoration of the victory, another week of celebration and feasting was declared by the Patriciate.
my favorite phrase !

are you going to set the Italians, et. al., free? if not, then perhaps you should consider adding some more cultures to your national mix... or, do you "assimilate" them?

did you set up a military academy? it should help your lack of leadership, yes?

this is a KILLER AAR ! ! ! :cool:


OH, do you have time for a WC?
 

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Switzerland 1884-1890: A Larger Scale

Some, especially the despicable British, doubted the benevolent nature of the Patriciate. International opinion was now firmly against the Swiss government.

This however, did not bother the Patriciate much, especially in regards to the British. The Patriciate had long watched the cruel British occupation of India and knew that the British weren't much better than the French and Austrian oppressors they had previously fought. Better to be hated than loved by such a despicable, corrupt empire.

In 1884, after winning their landmark victory against the evil Austrians, the wise and benevolent Patriciate pursued a short period of peace.

However, due to the stunning success of the Swiss Empire, many more envoys came begging for liberation. The Patriciate wanted peace as always. But the sight of those poor children brought from Hesse-Kessel where they were forced to endure unspeakable hardship was too much for the Patriciate to bear.

By this time the mighty German alliance had been shattered, primarily due to the repeated defeats of Austria.

The Swiss armies again mustered at the northern borders and declared war. After the smaller German minors fell, the cry for liberation did not soften. Indeed, it grew ever louder. Everywhere the Swiss were hailed as liberators.

In 1888, over the course of a few short years, much of northern Germany was granted Swiss government:



Thinking this massive liberation would solve their troubled consciences, the Patriciate breathed a heavy sigh of relief.

But peace was not in the cards. More envoys arrived, now from Belgium and the Netherlands. Again, the kind Patriciate was unable to ignore their desperate plight.

A few months later, after the Swiss army steamrolled the pathetic armies thrown against them, much of the Netherlands and Belgium was finally free:



Again, the Patriciate thought it's task was done. But Swiss troops were now seen as liberators. The sight of them so close to French soil stirred the hearts of the French, and they quickly sent envoys to the Patriciate.

The Swiss army fell upon France as they had done before.

In 1889, after a few months of war, the French made peace:



After this series of liberations, the Swiss Empire was finally rightfully regarded by its peers as the mightiest nation on the planet.

Reports soon came of an Austrian military build up. It seems that the Austrian were beginning to build more divisions in order to eventually retake the lands they had previously oppressed.

The Patricians shook their heads sadly at this utterly foolish pride. They sent the Swiss army east, and the Austrian forces were again utterly destroyed.

In 1890, after a few months of war, the Austrians again sued for peace:



Thus, in less than a decade, the Swiss Empire was vastly expanded, and some of the mightiest nations of Europe were humbled.
 

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Jul 28, 2004
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Switzerland is looking remarkably HREish...
 

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Primus Inter Pa said:
Some, especially the despicable British, doubted the benevolent nature of the Patriciate. International opinion was now firmly against the Swiss government.

In 1890, after a few months of war, the Austrians again sued for peace..
it appears that your BB is rather high. :rofl: oh well, that is a small price to pay for the privilege of liberating so many people. just how high is it?

it is a shame that you don't have more of Austria. those guys really know how to oppress people.

Hmmm. and France. not to mention Spain... and, of course, Russia (and, everything west of Russia.) well, that is, the part of Russia that requests liberation.

excellent progress ! ! ! :cool:



amazing ! ! :D
 

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Hehe. I love how the Patriciate goes from "their love of peace conflicting with their sense of justice" to "fell upon the French as before" in just a few short years. Addictive, those conquests.
 

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The benevolent Swiss patriciate does not "conquer."

They "liberate."

And yes liberation is addictive. A self-less act for the benefit of others.

The Patriciate is such a nice government. Government funded health care and everything!

How could you doubt it's wonderful intentions? Really. Cynics these days, everywhere I turn.
 

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Switzerland 1890-1893: The Grand Invasion

The Patriciate, again weary after long conquests, pursued peace for the better part of two years.

However, in 1892, the despicable French began to build up their military again and a pre-emptive invasion was deemed necessary by the benevolent Patriciate.

The war was as all the other French wars were. It last a few months and many provinces were liberated:



About this time, the Patriciate realized that it could fully fund it's massive army and navy and still make about 200 pounds per day.

In addition to it's already glorious navy, the Patriciate had recently deployed a vast navy which would allow it to rule the waves as it already ruled the land:



Another unwelcome realization came to the Patriciate at this time.

The intervals of peace that the benevolent Patriciate had been setting aside between wars were allowing their opponents to rebuild their shattered armies.

The Patriciate, now realizing that it had no more financial reasons to pursue periods of peace, broke the peace treaty and declared war on France almost immediately after signing the peace treaty. This time Spain joined in too against Switzerland.

The war went well for Switzerland:



Finally peace was obtained. Spain gave up all of their overseas provinces in addition to a few mainland provinces:



Again, after the peace treaty was signed, Switzerland declared war. The wise Patriciate did not want to give the French and Spanish a chance to build up their forces of oppression.

A few more wars were fought. Vast tracts of land were given in exchange for peace.

In June of 1893, after breaking yet another peace treaty and declaring war on France and Spain, the evil and oppressive UK attempted to stab the glorious Swiss nation in the back.

However, the Patriciate had anticipated such a move would happen eventually. The modern Swiss Battleship navy made short work of the UK's ancient wooden ships.

In July of 1893, the mighty Swiss nation accepted peace with France and Spain on the following terms:



Now it turned it's attention to the evil UK.

Nearly 200,000 Swiss troops boarded their transports and set sail in one of the largest amphibious invasions the world had ever seen:



Some member of the Patriciate were frightened. How could Switzerland possibly take on the mighty British lion? Would the amphibious landing be successful or would the majority of the Swiss army be destroyed thus opening Switzerland up for invasion from all sides? Nevertheless, the noble and glorious Patriciate set their fears aside and set out to fight the war as best they could.