• Crusader Kings III Available Now!

    The realm rejoices as Paradox Interactive announces the launch of Crusader Kings III, the latest entry in the publisher’s grand strategy role-playing game franchise. Advisors may now jockey for positions of influence and adversaries should save their schemes for another day, because on this day Crusader Kings III can be purchased on Steam, the Paradox Store, and other major online retailers.


    Real Strategy Requires Cunning

Specialist290

Field Marshal
77 Badges
Feb 25, 2006
6.202
1.104
  • Crusader Kings II
  • Stellaris
  • Darkest Hour
  • Victoria 2
  • Europa Universalis III Complete
  • BATTLETECH
  • Prison Architect
  • Hearts of Iron III
  • Mount & Blade: Warband
  • Supreme Ruler: Cold War
  • Supreme Ruler 2020
  • Sword of the Stars
  • Rome Gold
  • King Arthur II
  • Cities: Skylines
  • Tyranny: Archon Edition
  • 500k Club
Glad to hear everything went smoothly with the hard disk recovery.

As for the format change: No worries :) I'll certainly miss some of the more detailed coverage, but at the same time it'll be good to see how everything fits together in the broader picture.

Once again, it seems as though the Balkans are poised on the knife's edge. Legionary Romania has tasted blood, and their irredentist ambitions will undoubtedly end up putting them on a collision course with the Habsburg Monarchy before much longer. Yet another headache for Berlin to deal with...
 

Maciej-Kamil

Captain
13 Badges
Jul 12, 2013
434
40
  • Crusader Kings II
  • Crusader Kings II: Legacy of Rome
  • Crusader Kings II: The Old Gods
  • Crusader Kings II: The Republic
  • Crusader Kings II: Sunset Invasion
  • Crusader Kings II: Sword of Islam
  • Darkest Hour
  • For the Motherland
  • Hearts of Iron III
  • Hearts of Iron III: Their Finest Hour
  • Semper Fi
  • Victoria 2
I'll miss the current format, but I understand that you had to make this change. I'm glad that nothing was lost in the crash.

And about Romania: will they try to do something like Anschluss of Transilvania? If so, then I think that they might succeed - if Austrian government doesn't fight them now, then it won't be able to resist their demands later.
 

FishKrieg

Corporal
62 Badges
Mar 30, 2012
36
53
  • Victoria 2: Heart of Darkness
  • Stellaris - Path to Destruction bundle
  • Stellaris: Leviathans Story Pack
  • Europa Universalis IV: Third Rome
  • Pillars of Eternity
  • Victoria 2: A House Divided
  • Semper Fi
  • Europa Universalis IV: Res Publica
  • Majesty 2 Collection
  • Magicka
  • Hearts of Iron III: Their Finest Hour
  • Crusader Kings II
  • Darkest Hour
  • Europa Universalis IV: Art of War
  • Europa Universalis IV: Conquest of Paradise
  • Europa Universalis IV: Wealth of Nations
  • Hearts of Iron III Collection
  • Hearts of Iron III
  • For the Motherland
  • For The Glory
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Expansion Pass
  • Europa Universalis IV: Mandate of Heaven
  • BATTLETECH
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Death or Dishonor
  • Shadowrun: Dragonfall
  • Age of Wonders III
  • Europa Universalis IV: Cradle of Civilization
  • Stellaris: Apocalypse
  • Europa Universalis IV: Rule Britannia
  • Cities: Skylines - Parklife Pre-Order
  • Cities: Skylines - Parklife
  • Stellaris: Distant Stars
  • Europa Universalis IV: Dharma
  • Shadowrun Returns
  • Steel Division: Normandy 44
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Together for Victory
  • Stellaris: Digital Anniversary Edition
  • Europa Universalis IV: Rights of Man
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Cadet
  • Stellaris Sign-up
  • Stellaris
  • Europa Universalis IV: Mare Nostrum
  • Europa Universalis IV: Cossacks
  • Europa Universalis IV: Common Sense
  • Magicka: Wizard Wars Founder Wizard
  • Europa Universalis IV: El Dorado
  • Crusader Kings III: Royal Edition
  • 500k Club
  • Warlock: Master of the Arcane
Is there a reason that so many people died in North America due to collectivisation? In OTL USSR, this happened mainly because much of the USSR wasn't fully industrialised (a gap that Stalin was willing to seal as quickly as possible regardless of human cost), which the USA especially wouldn't have an issue with.
 

JodelDiplom

Field Marshal
22 Badges
Apr 5, 2013
3.940
1.498
  • Crusader Kings II: Horse Lords
  • Stellaris: Megacorp
  • Stellaris: Distant Stars
  • Stellaris: Apocalypse
  • Stellaris: Humanoids Species Pack
  • Stellaris - Path to Destruction bundle
  • Stellaris: Leviathans Story Pack
  • Stellaris: Digital Anniversary Edition
  • Stellaris
  • Crusader Kings II: Conclave
  • Crusader Kings II: Way of Life
  • Crusader Kings II: Charlemagne
  • Deus Vult
  • Crusader Kings II: Sword of Islam
  • Crusader Kings II: Sunset Invasion
  • Crusader Kings II: Sons of Abraham
  • Crusader Kings II: The Republic
  • Crusader Kings II: Rajas of India
  • Crusader Kings II: The Old Gods
  • Crusader Kings II: Legacy of Rome
  • Crusader Kings II
  • Stellaris: Synthetic Dawn
Is there a reason that so many people died in North America due to collectivisation? In OTL USSR, this happened mainly because much of the USSR wasn't fully industrialised (a gap that Stalin was willing to seal as quickly as possible regardless of human cost), which the USA especially wouldn't have an issue with.
True, North America in the 1940s is/was way richer than Russia in the 1930s. But:
1) America went through Civil War Mk II and the ruthless radical ideologues won. Being mainly city people, they might have viewed farmers with deep distrust and pursued intentionally hostile policies towards the rural anti syndicalist populations.

2) Farmers resisted collectivization and destroyed much of their equipment and livestock, greatly setting back the nation's ability to feed itself even in good times.

3) Faced with food shortages, the CSA leadership, like the soviets in OTL, doubled down on repression against the rural populations and confiscated all the food so that those cities, where their support was mainly based, were adequately fed. This combined with a breakdown of food trade between rural regions left the rural regions with enormous shortages, which would have hit hardest the small and medium towns not prioritized by the CSA government.

4) Faced with never ending insurrection from some rural regions the CSA security forces might have adopted economic blockade and starvation as weapons and accepted large scale famine as a consequence of their pacification effort.

Mostly I think it must have been a result of intentional policies by a repressive, city based regime against entire regions that resisted their rule. Think of them like William the conqueror and his Harrying of the North.
 
  • 1
  • 1Like
Reactions:

Health

Major
95 Badges
Feb 8, 2014
652
232
  • Crusader Kings II
  • Victoria 2: A House Divided
  • Victoria 2: Heart of Darkness
  • Europa Universalis IV: Common Sense
  • Hearts of Iron III: Their Finest Hour
  • Hearts of Iron III
  • Darkest Hour
  • Crusader Kings II: Reapers Due
  • Surviving Mars: First Colony Edition
  • Cities: Skylines - Parklife Pre-Order
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Expansion Pass
  • Victoria 2
  • Warlock: Master of the Arcane
  • War of the Roses
  • Cities: Skylines
  • Europa Universalis III: Collection
  • Europa Universalis IV: Mandate of Heaven
  • Crusader Kings II: Holy Fury
  • Magicka: Wizard Wars Founder Wizard
  • Crusader Kings II: Way of Life
  • Humble Paradox Bundle
  • Magicka 2
  • Crusader Kings II: Horse Lords
  • Europa Universalis IV: Rule Britannia
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Cadet
  • Crusader Kings II: Conclave
  • Hearts of Iron IV Sign-up
  • Stellaris Sign-up
  • Cities: Skylines - Mass Transit
  • Cities: Skylines - Green Cities
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Together for Victory
  • Europa Universalis IV: Golden Century
  • Europa Universalis IV: Dharma
  • Stellaris: Leviathans Story Pack
  • Stellaris: Apocalypse
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Death or Dishonor
  • Stellaris: Digital Anniversary Edition
  • Hearts of Iron IV: La Resistance
  • Age of Wonders: Planetfall Sign Up
  • Stellaris: Distant Stars
  • Stellaris: Lithoids
  • Crusader Kings II: Monks and Mystics
  • Cities: Skylines - Natural Disasters
  • Stellaris: Humanoids Species Pack
  • Surviving Mars
  • Europa Universalis IV: Rights of Man
  • Shadowrun: Dragonfall
  • Shadowrun Returns
  • Cities: Skylines - Parklife
1956 - The Martyr

Volodymyr looked out at the masses from the bedroom window. Khreshchatyk seemed to be filled to the brim with people waving flags without the coat of arms. Although the window was closed he felt as if he could make out some of their chants and even speeches from the Duma Square.
"...Ukraine without a Hetman! Power to the people!..."
Although the protests had been going on for nearly five months the geriatric Skoropadskyi seemed unwilling to budge or even compromise. Once the strikes began a month ago, he had been lucky enough to be taken in by his sister after that greedy pig of a landlord threw him out.

"Volodia, could you run down to the shop to get half-a-dozen eggs," his sister called out to him.
"Sure thing," he replied heading to the foyer.
"Oh and some flour would also be great, if you could," she said half-leaning out of the kitchen.
"What would you do with out me, Nina," he jokingly replied putting on his boots, coat and then heading out.

Walking down the stairs he couldn't help but remember the last time he had stayed here. Playing on the stairwell with Anton and Zoya, after Nina had taken them in. It was a much different world then and helped them forget, probably too much he thought to himself. The little ones likely didn't even remember their mother and although he didn't want to admit it, even he had begun to forget her face and voice. His attempts at remembering her this time fell flat as well, as the mass of joyous protestors overwhelmed his mind upon exiting the stairwell.
"...We want to take a chance. Down with Pavlo!..."
The various anti-government chants were all that he could think about as the brisk autumn air filled his lungs. For a single moment he considered joining the crowd, but abandoned the thought wanting to not leave Nina waiting. His silent contemplation was also broken as a familiar booming voice appeared from behind him.
"Well now, isn't it Vova?"
"Oh," Volodymyr looked back to see the owner of the booming voice. A brown haired giant of a man wrapped in a yellow-blue flag and towering over both the crowd and him.
"Ah, Vitaliy. What are you doing here, didn't you say you were going back home to Cherkasy after the demob?"
"Nice to see you too. Should be fairly obvious what I'm doing, shouldn't it? Doing my part in advancing the revolutionary moment, what about you?" Vitaliy answered with a slight tinge of snark in his voice
"My bad, my bad. Nice to see you Vitaliy, I'm not doing much just popping down to the shops," he answered apologetically whilst gesturing the giant to walk with him.
The duo set down the street dodging other demonstrators.
"You still with those coots preaching about Lenin," Volodymyr asked.
"Not since Odessa. How about you, still together with Nataliya?"
Volodymyr stopped for a moment, causing the giant to look back. Walking back the giant saw that Volodymyr's eyes were filled with a note of bitter sweetness at the mention of her name. Eager to escape the seeming landmine he had trod on Vitaliy spoke up again.
"Listen, I've got to go meet back up with my group, if I'm away for too long they'll think the coppers snatched me again. However let's meet up again at this bar tonight at say five-ish. We can catch up all we want then."
The proposal momentarily seemed to bring Volodymyr back from his trance and the two friends parted after sharing a hug as well as once again confirming their meet-up. Once Vitaliy left though, the memories of Nataliya that Volodymyr had tried to keep locked up once again flooded his mind. Her laugh, the way she smelled like fresh baked bread, that time he had jumped the base fence to meet her by the Dniper and the night they spent together. Time seemed to slow down and crawl as all the memories came flooding back leaving him feeling as he had suddenly stepped into a waterfall.

Locked in thought he almost missed the store, if a singular *ding* hadn't awoken him as another customer left the store. The same *ding* brought him fully back as he stepped into the store. The store was small but clean, with the goods all stocked on shelves behind the counter. In the store stood the elderly proprietor, Ivan, with a broom in his hand. Ivan had been running the store and been old as long as Volodymyr remembered.
"How goes it Volodia," Ivan asked in his usual cheery, but raspy voice that betrayed his greatest pleasure. Whilst moving behind the counter.
"Fine, fine. How about you," Volodymyr replied following behind him.
"Well my back isn't what it used to and business has been kind of slow recently, but I couldn't really complain. However its not like you just came to listen to an old man ramble on did you? Just the usual?" Ivan said pulling a pack of smokes from under the counter.
"Thanks, but I've got a few extra things I need today. So you won't be getting rid of me that easily," he said before listing Nina's requests.
"Why'd you think I want to get rid of you," Ivan asked putting his things into a bag. "An old man like me has few people to talk to and of those even fewer people are actually interesting. Remember that, if there's anything you want to talk about you can come to me. Even if it is about Nat..."
"You'll be the first to know, Vanya," he said cutting the old man off in an attempt to beat back the memories, " How much to I owe you?"
"5 Hryvina. Pleasure to do business with you. Keep safe out there won't you, boy. The folks on the radio have been saying some weird things over the last few hours."
"They've been saying weird things for days now, Vanya. That's the sound of a desperate dictator, but same back at you."

Volodymyr lit a cigarette and stepped out the store. Something had changed in the short period that he had been in the store. He felt as if he was sitting on a powder keg and that's when he heard it, the match.
"All protestors are to return to zeir homes effectiffe immediately by order of General Barth, any rezistance vill be met by force!"
That was all it took to send the crowd into a frenzy. The whole mass broke out in one voice chanting profanities and directions, where the Germans could stuff their orders. The chanting once more drew in Volodymyr. This raucous resistance however broke in a single moment as the first shots rang out. The crowd once more changed pace, as masses of people began to scramble over everybody and anybody in their way to get out of the streets. That is everybody except Volodymyr, who seemed to stand like a lighthouse in a raging sea. Shocked and stunned, as he watched the mass of people flee like sheep. Another moment passed and as the gleaming steel helmets and deafening rumble of engines got closer something seemed to take ahold of him. Bending down to pick up a discarded flag, he pushed towards the centre of the street. Standing defiantly with the flag in his left hand and his groceries in his left, the German column reached him. Seemingly confused by this act of resistance a head popped out from the hatch of the machine.
"Get out of ze vay or ve vill be forced to use force," the vehicle commander yelled.
Untaunted by these orders, Volodymyr stood firm and countered in German "Hetman Kaputt! Long live Free Ukraine!"
Undaunted by this show of backbone, the commander once again demanded that vacate the road and let the German column through. Volodymyr remained unfazed and continued to just stand there, visibly annoyed by this point the commander barked orders at the soldiers walking besides the column. Although he tried to resist them, the soldiers easily overpowered Volodymyr. First pulling the flag from his hands and then battering him with the butts of their rifles. His vision failing, his mind was filled with just one thought and face that of his mother.


-----------------------------------------

January


January 1 - In Niigata Prefecture a stampede at Yahiko Shrine results in 124 dead and 77 injured. Government inquires lead to the conclusion that the large amount of people, more than 30 thousand by some reports, and small amount of police officers, around 16 mostly delegated to traffic duty, is to blame. Due to this the number of police officers at future shrine events is increased. Stringent measures attempting to both control crowd size and their direction are also enforced. Shinto priests critical of the government claim that such events could be avoided if the one shrine per village policy were to be weakened.
January 3 - In Paris, the upper levels of the Eiffel Tower are damaged when a fire breaks out at a television transmitter. Seeking to push the idea of reconciliation the Kaiser donates a sizable donation for the restoration of the tower.
January 11 - Ishida Ichimatsu, a comedian and entertainer, dies at the age of 53. Although officially deemed to be the result of stomach cancer; his addiction to Philopon, a stimulant, is public knowledge. Ishida's death fuels a growing anti-stimulant movement among the public.
January 26 – The 1956 Winter Olympics open in Oslo, heralding the first Olympic Games to be held in a Syndicalist state.


The first Olympic Games in a Syndicalist state proved to be a watershed moment for the Olympic
movement,
as well as an opportunity for the Internationale to show the superiority of Syndicalism
February

February 6 - The Shinchō publishing house publishes the first Japanese weekly magazine that differs from the "newspaper" format the 'Weekly Shinchō'.
February 14 - In Santiago, Chile a train crash results in the death of 23 people and injures another 198. Protests about the declining state of railways and inadequate government response are quickly crushed by the military junta.
February 15 - Miyoshi Hideyuki, the Diet member for the 4th district of Tottori prefecture dies in Tokyo Second National Hospital. Although a long term supporter of Minseito, Miyoshi had lead one of the largest exoduses of the party to the Seiyukai.
February 21 - Despite attempts at covering it up the Pastors Protest in Montgomery, Alabama leaks to foreign media outlets. 24 pastors block protest in front of a proscribed church dated to be turned into a gymnasium. The event draws attention to the continued persecution of believers in the Combined Syndicates of America.


Although the religious establishment had been dealt with following the Great American Revolution,
new ones quickly took their place in bearing the torch and tending to their flock.

March

March 3 – A state election in New South Wales, Australia, results in a swing away from the Labor Party as a coalition between the Liberal and Country parties take the state by storm. Whilst the Labor Party alleges voter fraud, the former opposition claims that their support is a result of the booming economy.
March 21 - The NHK reports that their television broadcasts now the whole Home Islands. According to estimates based on license fees gathered by the organization an estimated 70% of households have a television set. This heralds the end of the radio among the so called "Three Treasures of the Shōwa Era".
March 24 - The second Mitsui Miike Strike kicks off as workers take action at the attempted rationalization of the mine by the Mitsui zaibatsu, an action which is seen by many as an attempt at rooting out union activists and threatens more than 5000 jobs.
March 31 - Unions across Japan kick off the first Spring Wages Offensive (Shuntō), whilst some claim that the offensive amounts to solidarity strikes for the Miike miners others claim that it is little more than a facade put on by the unions to drive public attention away from the strike.


Wives of Miike miners confronting Mitsui offiicials. Although lacking suffrage,
women had become a vital backbone of the Japanese labour movement.

April
April 2 – 'Tonight', the main evening newscast premiers on the Central Broadcast System Television Network in the Combined Syndicates of America, althoughonly an estimated 2% of households have a television set.
April 4 - The Eighth Congress of the Greater Italian Union sees the Social-Reformists Union achieve nigh-singular control of the Congress, as the Anarcho-Syndicalists massively lose ground and what few delegates of the National-Syndicalists are left refuse to campaign.
April 18 – Maria Desylla-Kapodistria is elected mayor of Corfu, becoming the first female mayor in Greece.
April 30 - Social Democrats win a majority in the Folketing elections in Denmark.


'Tonight' rapidly became the face of a new era, especially as the American government sought to provide a television in each home
May

May 1 - In Minamata, Kumamoto Prefecture a hospital first reports the spread of an "epidemic of an unknown disease of the central nervous system". The cause of the epidemic quickly becomes the topic of much speculation among the general public.
May 9 – Manaslu, eighth highest mountain in the world, is first ascended, by a Japanese team.
May 18 – Lhotse main summit, the fourth highest mountain in the world, is first ascended by a Swiss team.
May 24 – The first Eurovision Song Contest takes place in Lugano, Switzerland. Organized by Germany the contest is attended only by Mittleeuropan states, as well as Switzerland. Lys Assia, a Swiss singer, is crowned the first winner.


Although primarily a radio event the first Eurovision proved to be one of
the first television shows broadcast across the entirety of Mitteleuropa

June

June 6 - Following mounting pressure as cases of what has been labeled the Minamata disease continue to mount, the Ministry of Health and Welfare forms an investigatory board for the purpose of investigating the origin of the disease.
June 10 – 1956 Summer Olympics begin in Athens, Greece. Germany, the Combined Syndicates of America and Hungary earn the largest amount of medals, whilst Romania and Bulgaria protest the event.
June 13 - Real Madrid beats Stade Reims 4–3 at Parc des Princes, Paris and wins the First European Cup.
June 28 - Labour riots in Sevastopol, Ukraine are crushed. Government troops fire at a crowd protesting against low wages, killing an estimated 53 people.

The populace of the Eastern parts of Mitteleuropa had begun to grow
resentful of their autocratic regimes enforced by the German Empire

July

July 1 - Further protests begin in Ukraine as news of the shootings in Sevastopol spread. The phrase "Wir wollen mehr Demokratie wagen" ("We want to take a chance on more Democracy"), from the speech of the German chancellor soon becomes a rallying cry for the movement as more and more groups join hands against the Hetmanate.
July 8 – The mountain Gasherbrum II, on the border of India and the Mongolian puppet state of Xinjiang, is first ascended, by an Austrian expedition.
July 9 – The Cyclades islands are rocked by a 7.7 magnitude earthquake. The earthquake and the tsunami leave 53 people dead, sailors from a nearby German destroyer group arrive to aid the recovery efforts highlighting the improving relations between Greece and Germany.
July 24 - Protests originating in Ukraine spread into the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth and the United Baltic Duchy.


The German Everest Expedition in 1952 had launched a renewed interest in the Himalayas.
August

August 8 – 262 miners, chiefly labourers from Italy, die in a fire at the Bois du Cazier coal mine, in Marcinelle, Wallonia. The incident prompts calls by the governments of both Italian states for the Wallonian government to improve the working conditions of its foreign labourers. The Walloonian government responds by targeting active recruitment towards other countries.
August 9 – In London the exhibition 'This Is Tomorrow' opens at the Whitechapel Art Gallery. The exhibition is a mix of Syndicalist realism and futurism, both trends pushed by the Mosleyite government and attracting much attention across the Syndicalist art world.
August 20 - Viktor von Marnitz, Prime Minister of the United Baltic Duchy, announces on a radio broadcast that the government is willing to make concessions to the protestors and strive towards greater equality between the minority Baltic Germans and the native Estonian and Latvian populations. This includes the highly controversial demand for the Landtag to represent the demographic state of the Duchy.
August 22 - In Finland the Red-Earth coalition, Social-Democrats and Agrarians, win their 5th election in a row. The Agrarian candidate Urho Kaleva Kekkonen is sworn in as Prime Minister of Finland the following day. In his inauguration speech the Prime Minister makes a show of solidarity with the protestors in Ukraine, the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth as well as offering guidance for the government of the United Baltic Duchy.


Prime Minister Kekkonen had earned a reputation as a political wild card,
a reputation he would continue to live up to even after his first day in office.

September

September 3 - Archduchess Maria Henrietta of Austria dies.
September 11 - The "Shipbuilding" scandal erupts in the Japanese Diet. Numerous Diet members are implicated in taking bribes in exchange for passing legislation that would hand lucrative government contracts to specific zaibatsu.
September 13 - The hard disk drive is invented by a Furukawa-Siemens team.
September 16 – Television broadcasting in Australia commences.
September 20 - Following the example set by the United Baltic Duchy, the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth makes concessions promising increased democratization.


Bruce Gygnell, often credited as the first Australian to appear on television,
would take television beyond just copying what happened in Japan

October

October 14 – Former president of India, Dr. B. R. Ambedkar, converts to Buddhism, along with 385,000 followers sparking the Dalit Buddhist movement. Members of the movement are largely from the Dalit class, the so-called Untouchables, who reject Hinduism and the class system still plaguing India.
October 17 - The world's first industrial-scale commercial nuclear power plant is opened at Tōkai, Ibaraki Prefecture.
October 23 – The Ukrainian Hetmanate officially requests aid from the German government. The ageing Skoropadskyi appears at the German embassy claiming that the country is on the brink of collapse and demands that Germany send troops to quell the uprising.
October 25 – Demonstrations in honour of Red October turn violent in Petrograd as workers clash with soldiers.
October 30 - The 'Temple of the Golden Pavilion' is released as a completed book after being released in parts for the last 10 months in the literary magazine 'Shinchō'. The book draws both praise and ire, as the literary community clashes over the anti-modernist, anti-government themes as well as claims that it is just facilitating the ero guro nansensu movement.
October 31 - An Imperial Japanese Navy team, departing from Tasmania, becomes the third group to reach the South Pole. The team later commence the construction of the first permanent South Pole Station, Shōwa Base.


The Tōkai Power Plant would be the first among, built by MITI for the
purpose of fulfilling growing energy demands in Japan

November

November 1 - The States Reorganisation Act of India begins the long-winded process of reforming the boundaries and names of the numerous Indian states.
November 4 – Thousands are killed, more are wounded and more than half a million leave the country as recently arrived German troops leave their garrisons and crush the protests in cities across Ukraine. The Russian government freely accepts all Ukrainians that flee across the border.
November 16 - The Treaty of Osaka is signed marking an end to the 15 year long Japanese mandate and establishing the independent state of Nusantra. Japan begins the withdrawal of most of its forces from the territory of the island chain, as the Nusantran National Army, recently renamed from PETA, takes over its tasks.
November 28 – Roger Vadim's drama film 'And God Created Woman', released in France as 'Et Dieu ... créa la femme', propels Brigitte Bardot into the public spotlight as a "sex kitten".


Bardot was just one of many stars emerging from the Kingdom of France, rising from the ashes like a phoenix
December

December 2 - The 'Mad Bomber' plants a pipe bomb at the Paramount Theater in Brooklyn, the subsequent explosion injures 6 people. The explosion draws tremendous media coverage and results in what leaders of the New York Peoples Militia call the greatest manhunt in the history of New York city.
December 5 – Rose Heilbron becomes Britain's first female judge.
December 21 - Doctors in Guizhou province in the Republic of China report cases of influenza that are now thought to be the origin for the 1957-58 influenza pandemic.
December 30 - Across the Empire of Japan celebrations are held in honour of the Pearl Jubilee of the Shōwa Emperor.


The pandemic of 1918 still fairly fresh in mind, governments quickly sought to stamp down on the virus through strict measures
-----------------------------------------

As I suspected, this week has been rather busy, I hope you enjoyed the first post in the new format.


Glad to hear everything went smoothly with the hard disk recovery.

As for the format change: No worries :) I'll certainly miss some of the more detailed coverage, but at the same time it'll be good to see how everything fits together in the broader picture.

Once again, it seems as though the Balkans are poised on the knife's edge. Legionary Romania has tasted blood, and their irredentist ambitions will undoubtedly end up putting them on a collision course with the Habsburg Monarchy before much longer. Yet another headache for Berlin to deal with...
Berlin will find it only harder going on, not only from rivals from outside but also threats from within as you can see.

I'll miss the current format, but I understand that you had to make this change. I'm glad that nothing was lost in the crash.

And about Romania: will they try to do something like Anschluss of Transilvania? If so, then I think that they might succeed - if Austrian government doesn't fight them now, then it won't be able to resist their demands later.
Romania may try, but an "Anschluss" usually requires a willing participant. Of course that doesn't discount other types of land grabs, especially given that their armed militants are in place.

Is there a reason that so many people died in North America due to collectivisation? In OTL USSR, this happened mainly because much of the USSR wasn't fully industrialised (a gap that Stalin was willing to seal as quickly as possible regardless of human cost), which the USA especially wouldn't have an issue with.
True, North America in the 1940s is/was way richer than Russia in the 1930s. But:
1) America went through Civil War Mk II and the ruthless radical ideologues won. Being mainly city people, they might have viewed farmers with deep distrust and pursued intentionally hostile policies towards the rural anti syndicalist populations.

2) Farmers resisted collectivization and destroyed much of their equipment and livestock, greatly setting back the nation's ability to feed itself even in good times.

3) Faced with food shortages, the CSA leadership, like the soviets in OTL, doubled down on repression against the rural populations and confiscated all the food so that those cities, where their support was mainly based, were adequately fed. This combined with a breakdown of food trade between rural regions left the rural regions with enormous shortages, which would have hit hardest the small and medium towns not prioritized by the CSA government.

4) Faced with never ending insurrection from some rural regions the CSA security forces might have adopted economic blockade and starvation as weapons and accepted large scale famine as a consequence of their pacification effort.

Mostly I think it must have been a result of intentional policies by a repressive, city based regime against entire regions that resisted their rule. Think of them like William the conqueror and his Harrying of the North.
I think there is a very important distinction to make here, the deaths in the USSR due to collectiviztion were not directly due to the rapid industrialization. The deaths were a side-effect of the policies, or policy failures, used to pursue both the goals of industrialization, collectivization as well as stamping out resistance.

These same points, which I think Jodel worded very succinctly above, are largely true in the CSA. Although the need for rapid industrialization is not there, the desire to not only rebuild the glory of the US of old, but to surpass it sure is there. The task is undoubtedly herculean in nature and should also be considered.
 
  • 3Love
Reactions:

Maciej-Kamil

Captain
13 Badges
Jul 12, 2013
434
40
  • Crusader Kings II
  • Crusader Kings II: Legacy of Rome
  • Crusader Kings II: The Old Gods
  • Crusader Kings II: The Republic
  • Crusader Kings II: Sunset Invasion
  • Crusader Kings II: Sword of Islam
  • Darkest Hour
  • For the Motherland
  • Hearts of Iron III
  • Hearts of Iron III: Their Finest Hour
  • Semper Fi
  • Victoria 2
Why did Kaiser allow his troops to shoot? It surprised me, especially given that in other parts of Eastern Mittleuropa governments reacted peacefully. He should've used the military to eliminate Petlura. This would make Germans more popular and allow them to have a good controll over the situation.
 

JodelDiplom

Field Marshal
22 Badges
Apr 5, 2013
3.940
1.498
  • Crusader Kings II: Horse Lords
  • Stellaris: Megacorp
  • Stellaris: Distant Stars
  • Stellaris: Apocalypse
  • Stellaris: Humanoids Species Pack
  • Stellaris - Path to Destruction bundle
  • Stellaris: Leviathans Story Pack
  • Stellaris: Digital Anniversary Edition
  • Stellaris
  • Crusader Kings II: Conclave
  • Crusader Kings II: Way of Life
  • Crusader Kings II: Charlemagne
  • Deus Vult
  • Crusader Kings II: Sword of Islam
  • Crusader Kings II: Sunset Invasion
  • Crusader Kings II: Sons of Abraham
  • Crusader Kings II: The Republic
  • Crusader Kings II: Rajas of India
  • Crusader Kings II: The Old Gods
  • Crusader Kings II: Legacy of Rome
  • Crusader Kings II
  • Stellaris: Synthetic Dawn
Why did Kaiser allow his troops to shoot? It surprised me, especially given that in other parts of Eastern Mittleuropa governments reacted peacefully. He should've used the military to eliminate Petlura. This would make Germans more popular and allow them to have a good controll over the situation.
Maybe the emperor doesn't get to control the affairs of the almighty Heer all that much?
Maybe the Heer has its own foreign policy, independent from the elected chancellor and the monarch :eek:
Maybe the Heer has its own advisory board on foreign politics, and on that board sit a bunch of industrial magnates who hold favorable contracts given out by the rulers of the friendly states to Germany's east, retired generals who upon retirement received vast estates in those friendly states to the east, from those friendly rulers, and elder statesmen who considered their personal relationships with those friendly rulers the most important aspect around which foreign policy should be organized...
All of these people would see the nationalist protests as dangerous not just to the coherence and vitality of the Mitteleuropa project but also to their very own personal interests. Guess what their advice to the crown and to Supreme Army Command would be.

Most foreign policy in the real world is actually advised / guided by bodies like that, it's not far from how the foreign policy of nations like the USA or Germany are done in this very day and age. Except for the part about a military doing its own thing, although you don't need to look far to find examples of that in our own time as well. Iran is one example.
 

Health

Major
95 Badges
Feb 8, 2014
652
232
  • Crusader Kings II
  • Victoria 2: A House Divided
  • Victoria 2: Heart of Darkness
  • Europa Universalis IV: Common Sense
  • Hearts of Iron III: Their Finest Hour
  • Hearts of Iron III
  • Darkest Hour
  • Crusader Kings II: Reapers Due
  • Surviving Mars: First Colony Edition
  • Cities: Skylines - Parklife Pre-Order
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Expansion Pass
  • Victoria 2
  • Warlock: Master of the Arcane
  • War of the Roses
  • Cities: Skylines
  • Europa Universalis III: Collection
  • Europa Universalis IV: Mandate of Heaven
  • Crusader Kings II: Holy Fury
  • Magicka: Wizard Wars Founder Wizard
  • Crusader Kings II: Way of Life
  • Humble Paradox Bundle
  • Magicka 2
  • Crusader Kings II: Horse Lords
  • Europa Universalis IV: Rule Britannia
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Cadet
  • Crusader Kings II: Conclave
  • Hearts of Iron IV Sign-up
  • Stellaris Sign-up
  • Cities: Skylines - Mass Transit
  • Cities: Skylines - Green Cities
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Together for Victory
  • Europa Universalis IV: Golden Century
  • Europa Universalis IV: Dharma
  • Stellaris: Leviathans Story Pack
  • Stellaris: Apocalypse
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Death or Dishonor
  • Stellaris: Digital Anniversary Edition
  • Hearts of Iron IV: La Resistance
  • Age of Wonders: Planetfall Sign Up
  • Stellaris: Distant Stars
  • Stellaris: Lithoids
  • Crusader Kings II: Monks and Mystics
  • Cities: Skylines - Natural Disasters
  • Stellaris: Humanoids Species Pack
  • Surviving Mars
  • Europa Universalis IV: Rights of Man
  • Shadowrun: Dragonfall
  • Shadowrun Returns
  • Cities: Skylines - Parklife
1957 - The Fall

The death of Kurt Schumacher in August of 1952, just a few months after the appointment of his successor shocked the German political world. Although Schumacher had been a controversial figure given his outspoken nature and policies, the same nature and policies had earned him the respect of both the public and his rivals. Indeed after his death even the Kreuzzeitung, the official newspaper of the DKP, praised him for leading the country 'to the best of his abilities and the betterment of the Kaiserreich'. The death of Schumacher also marked the continued ascension of the so-called interwar generation in the SPD. The new and energetic leaders inspired much enthusiasm among the public towards the SPD, when most of the other parties were lead by increasingly geriatric individuals. This new generation as well as a noticeable although small influx of female leaders would also be claimed as contributing to the amazing results by the SPD at the general election in March of 1952. The enthusiasm however could not last indefinitely, especially as the Frahm cabinet found itself moving from one crisis to another. The Irish Revolution would be the first to beginning chipping away at government support and kick-start the normalization of the 'new SPD'. Although public support remained behind the government handling of the crisis, it did raise concerns among a number of groups. First were the so-called Young Radicals, SPD members born usually in the 1910s-1920s, and one group among the so-called new SPD. These members were ideologically very mixed however all had greatly supported the rise of Frahm, as he represented a chance to break the rabid anti-Syndicalism of the Schumacher era. Their replacement policies ranged from advocating peaceful coexistence with the Syndcalist powers to stoking revolution within the Kaiserreich itself. Many young parliamentarians that had supported the Frahm government just days prior openly attacked chancellor Frahm for provoking Ireland and the SynIntern with the naval exercises of the coast of Cork. On the other side of the spectrum the right was also far from pleased with the actions of the chancellor. Although the losses in Indochina and China had seen the decline of the DKP, and the rise of a Zentrum seeking to accept both Catholics and Protestants, their increasing irrelevance had done little to temper their tone with many parliamentarians attacking the chancellor for "pissing away the empire".


Helmut Schmidt a rising star among the Young Radicals ranks, whose outspoken rhetoric earned him the nickname Schmidt the Lip

The Irish Revolution however however proved to be more than a loss of face for the government. Prior to Schumacher's policy of demobilization, the conservative coalition had began the guest workers program in order to solve German labour troubles by recruiting workers from across Mitteleuropa and the Empire. After it became clear that the demobilization wasn't enough to fill the gaps in the labour market the Schumacher cabinet had opted to expand the program instead of engaging in further demobilization. The Schumacher expansions had also seen the expansion of the program to Ireland as well as Turkey and the Balkans. The new Irish government however declared its participation in the program to be null and void as well as demanding the repatriation of all Irishmen still in the German Empire. Although Germany refused this demand of repatriation, the loss of Irish workers posed a considerable risk for the German shipping industry as although the Irish had never made up a massive percentage among the participants of the guest worker program they had proven invaluable to shipping. Although government actions such as increased recruitment in the East helped alleviate the most pressing concerns of the shipping concerns, the whole Irish debacle continued to draw away time and resources from advancing the welfare state and reduced the cabinet to glorified firefighters. Rather than weaken support for the 'chance at democracy', these events had the opposite effect with more of the SPD becoming convinced that that it was not only necessary, but also the only way of maintaining Germany as a world power and benefiting her population. The 'chance at democracy' also went well with the arguing for decolonization present in the SPD that had argued for a more hands off policy towards the overseas empire, allowing for full-blown local rule and democracy. Based on the Irish example they argued that the autocratic regime enforced by Collins was similar to German policy in its colonies and would make revolution the only viable alternative. The increasing strength of this sort of sentiment however only contributed to worsening relations between the government and the armed forces. Many of the latter were horrified by the laissez faire attitudes of the SPD and instead shared the opinions of the more conservative political factions. The reasons for these were many, however among most the empire was seen both as their life's work and retirement plan. The growth of this kind of sentiment and the unwillingness of the government to counter it lead many to plan for an alternative.


Due to the extent of the German Empire its reliance on shipping had increased massively

Whilst the following years would see the Kaiserreich acquire atomic weaponry of its own as well as the Schism between the Socialist Republic of Italy and the Syndicalist mainstream, the government would still find its position difficult. Even though the Frahm government managed to greatly expand the safety net of welfare, its attempts to do so were limited in part to the need to deal with constant crises. This meant that all of its victories were often outshone by new and worse crises from the North Sea flood to the atomic weapons test by the Atlantic Treaty Organization. The limited amount of experience in these subjects increased the cabinet's reliance on the armed forces as well as ironically contributing to the breakdown of relations between the two as more generals felt overruled and ignored by 'petulant children'. This unwilling tango would continue until the protests that sparked in Ukraine quickly spread across the eastern flank of Mitteleuropa. Although high-ranking officers both in the armed forces and intelligence community presented information that there was foreign interference in the protests, not least in Ukraine where both the Russians and the Syndicalists were reported to support protestors the cabinet proved lukewarm to these revelations. Indeed fairly high-ranking SPD officials as well as parliamentarians were seen expressing solidarity with the protestors. The armed forces first attempted to court the chancellor, hoping to convince him to condemn both the officials and the protests, but he proved reluctant. Following this as well as the concessions by the United Baltic Duchy as well as the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, a group of 20 high-ranking officers of the Heer put into motion a plan, which would culminate in the intervention in Ukraine. When news of the events in Ukraine spread the chancellor and cabinet were reportedly furious, at this blatant lack of insubordination. Orders for the arrest of the officers responsible for organizing the suppression of the protests were quickly circulated, but a subsequent tribunal would only find a single man responsible, whilst acquitting the remaining nineteen on technicalities. The struggle between the government and the armed forces would intensify when high-ranking generals in the air force denied air support for Irish forces that landed on the southern coast of Ireland on the 3rd of January, 1957. The botched Inchydoney invasion contributed to growing concern among the public that the SPD had lost control over the armed forces.


Inchydoney had been chosen as the landing point for the invasion due to its relative proximity to a major city
such as Cork, but relative distance from Dublin. Original plans saw another simultaneous invasion in Ulster,
but due to a lack of plausibility that part of the attack was cancelled.

Ever since 1955 government officials had been noticing a slowdown in consumption as more and more members of the middle-class decided to chose to engage in saving stemming largely from the growing instability of the world at large. The slowdown was also noticed in the construction industry, although there climbing interest rates as well as falling demand after the completion of most housing and infrastructure projects foreseen under postwar reconstruction plans were to blame. Whilst slight changes of policy seemed to have solved the looming recession, the the Loyalty Crisis took a sledgehammer to these efforts as the growing confrontation between the cabinet and armed forces caused a massive crash in consumption. Although quick government intervention limited the effects of the crisis, it could not save the labour market with tens of thousands of workers laid off. This event however could not have come at a worse time for the Kaiserreich, as although unlike the demobilization recession this crisis had sparked a few months prior to a general election. Although the five months leading up to the election saw the economy recover in record pace many in government still questioned whether it would be enough to save them at the ballot box. Their fears would prove to rightly placed as reports started to come in about low turnout in numerous key constituencies. These reports were only worsened given the fact that numerous small trade unions had broken with the party and coordinated votes in protest against government actions, which had failed to protect their membership during the crisis. Once news of the results started rolling in the breadth of the loss had become apparent with the SPD nearly pushed out of the Rhineland and taking serious hits across the country. Frahm had lead the SPD to the weakest election since the early 30s, when the Syndicalist scare had been in full swing and Black Monday had yet to happen. Bitterness of the defeat was only strengthened following an announcement by the FVP that it saw the coalition with SPD concluded and would pursue talks to with the NLP and Zentrum. Barely a week later the Kaiser appointed Konrad Hermann Joseph Adenauer, the 81 year-old leader of Zentrum, as the next chancellor of the German Empire ending a decade of SPD dominance over Germany.


Following the fall of the Conservative coalition on 1947, Adenauer had spent a decade pieceing
the movement back together, as well as expanding attractiveness of Zentrum to Protestants.


-----------------------------------------

January

January 3-6 – The Inchydoney invasion. Irish counter-revolutionary forces trained by the German military land on the southern coast of Ireland with the intent of overthrowing the Syndicalist republic. Although the force enjoys initial gains, a lack of air support and the forces surrender on the 6th when faced with an overwhelming counter attack.
January 12 - Victor Starffin, the first pitcher in Japan to win three hundred games, dies at the age of 40 when his car is hit by a tram on the Tōkyū Tamagawa Line. The exact circumstances of his death however remain unclear.
January 15 – In Japan, Akira Kurosawa's reworking of Macbeth, Throne of Blood, is released in theatres. The movie quickly draws praise for its strong visuals that many critics claim fill the gap left by the lack of poetry.
January 20 - The New York City 'Mad Bomber', George P. Metesky, is arrested in Waterbury, Connecticut, and charged with planting more than 30 bombs.
January 24 – The First African Syndicalist Congress gathers in Dakar on the 8th anniversary of the beginning of the 'Liberation'. Beyond the Syndicalist states in former Françafrique, delegations from as far as South Africa and Egypt attend. During the Congress a resolution is adopted aiming to liberate all of Africa from the shackles of colonialism with the help of the Atlantic Treaty Organization.


Kurosawa's reimagining of MacBeth to a Japanese setting became a big hit domesticly
and earned more in ticket sales than any other Toho film released in 1957.

February

February 13 - In Japan, public outrage is sparked following inquiries into the death of two soldiers of the Imperial Japanese Army. Although the inquiries prove that the two soldiers died due to terrible weather at a marching competition, they also reveal that the soldiers in question as well as others had been forced to take part by senior officers under threat of violence. The Aotake inquiry is the first to shed light into the culture of violence towards conscripts inside the IJA resulting in the creation of the Committee of Soldiers Mothers to combat this.
February 16 - In Sweden, Ingmar Bergman's film The Seventh Seal opens at cinemas. Although facing mixed criticism at home, the movie cements Bergman's reputation on the international level.
February 21 - Rikken Seiyūkai wins the 1957 General Election, despite the resignation of Prime Minister Inukai following his implication in the 'Shipbuilding' scandal. Kōno Ichirō wins the nomination as leader of the party, and subsequently prime minister, as more conservative factions reassume control of the party from the Minseito descendent.
February 25 – The Boy In The Box is discovered along a sideways in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The murder victim is described as Caucasian in appearance and 4 to 6 years old; the case is never solved.


Associating much of the old red brick building, the new parts of Tokyo Metropolitan Government Building
are completed
in February, presenting a new face for the growing metropolis and a symbiosis of the new and the old.

March

March 3 – The Netherlands, Austria and the Italian Federation join the 1957 Eurovision Song Contest, held in Frankfurt. The Dutch singer Corry Brokken wins with the song 'Net als toen'.
March 6 - In Japan, the first national weekly magazine targeted at women "Weekly Women" is launched.
March 9 - In Germany, growing discontent towards the government of Chancellor Frahm leads to a decisive defeat for the SPD in the general election. Konrad Hermann Joseph Adenauer, the leader of Zentrum, is appointed the 15th Chancellor of Germany leading a coalition of made up of the NLP, the FVP and his party Zentrum.
March 17 - 'Miyuki Baseball Class' airs on Nippon Television Network stations. The show both covers professional baseball results and also educates viewers about baseball.


The publicity offered by the Eurovision contest gave the German Empire an amazing
chance show how Frankfurt had risen
from the ashes of the Syndicalist War like a phoenix.
April

April 8 - In Japan, the Tokyo Telecommunications Engineering Corporation introduces the world's smallest transistor radio, the TR63 Pocketable Radio.
April 10 - In the Combined Syndicates of America, Sidney Lumet's '12 Angry Men' launches to much domestic acclaim. Set in the old US, the movie explores the power the people have to elicit change as the life or death of a young Syndicalist hangs in the balance.
April 12 – Following tensions between Malaysia and the territory of Singapore, Chancellor Adenauer announces that Singapore will gain self-rule from Malaysia on the 1st of January 1958. The move is a controversial one at home, as it is seen as a continuation of the German disengagement from Asia, but proves popular in Malaysia, as the shared state has proven a source of contention for both Malaysians and Singaporeans.
April 17 – In the Union of Britain, Dr. John Bodkin Adams is found guilty of murder at the Old Bailey. The doctor had drawn the attention of the Popular Militia following the deaths of 163 of his patients between 1946 and 1956. Further attention was drawn as 132 out of 310 patients had left Adams money or personal effects in their wills.
April 24 – In the Union of Britain, the BBC educational television series 'The Sky at Night' is first broadcast, presented by Patrick Moore.


Costing about one eight of an average Japanese monthly wage,
the TR-63 was a massive hit not only in Japan, but also Europe

May

May 4 - In the Combined Syndicates of America, Jimmy Hoffa, union leader, war hero and political leader, is arrested by the Department Against Misappropriation of Syndicalist Property, a sub-organization of the Department of Internal Security and charged with multiple accounts of bribery.
May 7 - In Zürich, German explorer and scientist Wilhelm Flichner dies. Flichner had been the leader of the controversial Second German Antarctic Expedition and had been preparing for an expose to strike back at his critics. His will however reveals that the expose is not to be published until 28 years after his death.
May 22 – In the Combined Syndicates of America, a 42,000-pound Mark 17 atomic bomb accidentally falls from a bomber near Albuquerque Charlotte.
May 30 – Real Madrid beats Fiorentina 2–0 at Santiago Bernabéu Stadium, Madrid. This marks the teams second European Cup win.


Although many feared that Hoffa's arrest would spark a round of purges much like in the Union of Britain,
both Browder and Foster appeared to be pleased with just reigning in Hoffa

June

June 5 - Near Gordion, the capital of ancient Phrygia, close to modern day Ankara the so-called 'mound of Midas', the Great Tumulus, is excavated.
June 11 - The 1957–58 influenza pandemic, first identified in Guizhou province of China, and earning the name the Hong Kong flu after it spread to the city, spreads to the Combined Syndicates of America. The virus has already spread widely among East Asia as well as reached Europe.
June 20 – Toru Takemitsu's 'Requiem for Strings' is first performed, by the Tokyo Symphony Orchestra.
June 27 – Hurricane Audrey demolishes Cameron, Louisiana and kills 400 people.

July

July 1 - In the Kingdom of France, production of the Traction Avant ceases. The car first entered production in the Commune of France which first entered production in 1934, where it served as a 'people's car'.
July 6 - In Japan the Odakyū 3000 Series SE, a pioneer among high-speed trains, began operation.
July 24 - Newspapers around the world report that Tokyo has become the biggest city in the world by population. It replaces New York causing some papers to claim the end of European domination over the rest of the world.
July 25 - Torrential rains hit Western Kyūshū and last for three days. A total of 992 people are killed in the floods and mudslides.
July 28 - Mexico City and the port city of Acapulco are shook by a strong earthquake.


Although the concept of a bullet train had been considered since the 1930s, it was not until the
Odakyū 3000 series SE set a world record of 145km/h, for a narrow gauge train,
and the Tōkaidō line had reached capcity that planners began to revisit the project.

August

August 4 – Juan Manuel Fangio, driving for Maserati, wins the Formula One German Grand Prix. His victory clinches his record-breaking 5th world drivers championship as well as his 4th consecutive championship.
August 19 - Whilst summering in Karuizawa in Nagano prefecture, Crown Prince Akihito takes part in a tennis tournament. During the tournament the Crown Prince meets with Shōda Michiko, eldest daughter of the head of the Nisshin Milling Company, an associate of the Nezu zaibatsu.
August 27 - In Tōkai, Ibaraki Prefecture a fire breaks out at a 50kW test reactor of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute releasing radioactive material into the surrounding environment. Concerns are raised about the nearby nuclear power plant, however a combined effort by the researchers and power plant officials to explain the difference between the two reactors puts most of the public at ease.
August 31 – The Russian Empire tests its first atomic weapon, the aptly named 'First Lightning', joining Japan, Germany and the Combined Syndicates of America as the fourth atomic power. Much of the uranium used to make the bomb has been acquired from Central Asian mines, created with German financial backing. Its acquisition of the bomb as well as allegations that it was involved in the protests in Ukraine, creates concern in Germany towards the Russian state.


Russian acquistion of the bomb added yet another player into the atomic standoff. Russian acquistion of the weapon put the Japanese Home Islands into potentially hostile atomic weapon range for the first time, greatly startling the Japanese military establishment.

September

September 4 - The Mongoose, a car brand produced by the Detroit Motor Plant, is released for sale in the Combined Syndicates of America becoming one of the first among the post-revolutionary people's cars available to the public.
September 20 - Professor Hideo Itokawa and other professors from Tokyo Imperial University demonstrate the launch of the first Japanese intercontinental cruise missile, the 'Kappa Type 4-C'.
September 21 - Haakon VII, the King of Norway, dies in exile in Sweden. Olav V is crowned the King of Norway after fleeing from Sweden to Denmark. Olav V is later barred from entering Sweden due Swedish demands that no new Norwegian kings be crowned, whilst in exile in Sweden. The Swedish government explains its policy as a factor of needing to maintain its neutrality, due to its extended land border with Norway and through it the Atlantic Treaty Organization.
September 29 – The Onida disaster occurs at a nuclear reprocessing plant in the Combined Syndicates of America. The cooling system in one of the tanks, containing about 70–80 tons of liquid radioactive waste, failed and was left unrepaired. Due to this the temperature began to rise in the tank, resulting in evaporation and a chemical explosion of the dried waste. Due to the secrecy around the site, the locals are not informed about the incident. Although a week later an operation to evacuate 10,000 people from the affected area begins.


Exiled following the Norwegian revolution, Olav V had secretly gained a commission in the Heer at the outbreak
of the Syndicalist War with hopes of gaining back his country, when this failed he returned to Sweden and was
put under maximum surveillance making his subsequent escape in 1957 a shock to Swedish authorities.

October

October 4 – The German Empire launches Trabant I, the first artificial satellite, into orbit around the Earth officially starting the space race.
October 10 - In Helsinki, Ayn Rand's fourth novel Atlas Shrugged is published. Rand had originally hoped to have her book published in Russia, however censorship stemming from her open attacks on the statism dominant in the Russian economy makes this impossible.
October 21 - In China, Japan sustains its first casualty after nearly 7 years of quiet following the atomic strike on Sydney. IJA Captain Tanaka Jiro of the 1st Raiding Group dies in an accident whilst training special forces of the Qing.
October 21 - Tokyo Giants win the second game against the Taiyo Whales at Kōrakuen stadium. The victory assures the Giants their third consecutive victory in the Central League.


The launch of the satellite was a happy coincidence of the A-17 program, using a modified version of the rocket.
Following the success of the launch the A-17 began to be rolled out units across the German Empire.

November

November 1 - In the Combined Syndicates of America the Mackinac Bridge opens, linking the two peninsulas of Michigan together. This allows for a more direct flow of resources from the Upper Peninsula to the industrial city of Detroit.
November 3 – Germany launches the Trabant II with the first animal to orbit the Earth on board. There is however no technology available to return the rhesus macaque named Adolf to Earth.
November 7 – In Japan, the Sugawara Report calls for more Japanese missiles and fallout shelters.
November 13 - In the Combined Syndicates of America, Gordon Gould invents the laser.
November 15 - In the Union of Britain the crash of a Solent flying boat on the Isle of Wight leaves 45 dead.


Although mired with issues and controversy, Mackinnack Bridge was the longest suspension bridge
in the world at the time of its construction with much of the labour used utilizing people under re-education.

December

December 5 – In Nusantra, all Dutch settlers still in the country are expelled following an intensification of the anti-European campaigns set in motion by the Japanese military.
December 10 - Princess Huisheng, niece of Emperor Puyi, is found dead on Mt. Amagi in the Izu peninsula after disappearing on the 4th of December with a male course-mate from Gakushūin University. The event sends shockwaves across the Empire, especially as Huisheng had been considered a potential candidate to marry Crown Prince Akihito due to being half-Japanese.
December 20 – The Dresden 152, a German jet airliner flies for the first time.
December 24 - The NHK experiments opens an experimental FM broadcasting station in Tokyo. Before beginning similar experiments in other major cities.


Although mired in suspicion the death Huisheng and her fiancee Ōkubo was quickly ruled a lover's suicide,
given his suicidal tendencies and the state of the bodies when they were found.



-------------------------------------------------------------------


Whew.... It's been quite a bit since the last post and I do apologize. Work overwhelmed me and I was not necessarily pleased with the last post, so I'm trying something different again based on some advice I got. Also, sorry to anybody that got ghost pinged and didn't get to actually read anything.

Why did Kaiser allow his troops to shoot? It surprised me, especially given that in other parts of Eastern Mittleuropa governments reacted peacefully. He should've used the military to eliminate Petlura. This would make Germans more popular and allow them to have a good controll over the situation.
Maybe the emperor doesn't get to control the affairs of the almighty Heer all that much?
Maybe the Heer has its own foreign policy, independent from the elected chancellor and the monarch :eek:
Maybe the Heer has its own advisory board on foreign politics, and on that board sit a bunch of industrial magnates who hold favorable contracts given out by the rulers of the friendly states to Germany's east, retired generals who upon retirement received vast estates in those friendly states to the east, from those friendly rulers, and elder statesmen who considered their personal relationships with those friendly rulers the most important aspect around which foreign policy should be organized...
All of these people would see the nationalist protests as dangerous not just to the coherence and vitality of the Mitteleuropa project but also to their very own personal interests. Guess what their advice to the crown and to Supreme Army Command would be.

Most foreign policy in the real world is actually advised / guided by bodies like that, it's not far from how the foreign policy of nations like the USA or Germany are done in this very day and age. Except for the part about a military doing its own thing, although you don't need to look far to find examples of that in our own time as well. Iran is one example.
Indeed, the Emperor himself isn't that much in control of the Heer or the military in general. Even the control the civilian government has over the military is a bit more... Vague, much like in WW2 Japan or really the German Empire. A state within a state as one would say. This was their way of acting out to announce that the government had gone too far, as outlined above. Could a compromise have been reached in Ukraine, perhaps. However that is not what happened.

edit; Thanks to Jodel for pointing out my mistake.
 
Last edited:
  • 3Love
Reactions:

Maciej-Kamil

Captain
13 Badges
Jul 12, 2013
434
40
  • Crusader Kings II
  • Crusader Kings II: Legacy of Rome
  • Crusader Kings II: The Old Gods
  • Crusader Kings II: The Republic
  • Crusader Kings II: Sunset Invasion
  • Crusader Kings II: Sword of Islam
  • Darkest Hour
  • For the Motherland
  • Hearts of Iron III
  • Hearts of Iron III: Their Finest Hour
  • Semper Fi
  • Victoria 2
Let's hope that Germans will win the space race. After all, CSA has probably sent some of its scientists to reeducation camps.
 

JodelDiplom

Field Marshal
22 Badges
Apr 5, 2013
3.940
1.498
  • Crusader Kings II: Horse Lords
  • Stellaris: Megacorp
  • Stellaris: Distant Stars
  • Stellaris: Apocalypse
  • Stellaris: Humanoids Species Pack
  • Stellaris - Path to Destruction bundle
  • Stellaris: Leviathans Story Pack
  • Stellaris: Digital Anniversary Edition
  • Stellaris
  • Crusader Kings II: Conclave
  • Crusader Kings II: Way of Life
  • Crusader Kings II: Charlemagne
  • Deus Vult
  • Crusader Kings II: Sword of Islam
  • Crusader Kings II: Sunset Invasion
  • Crusader Kings II: Sons of Abraham
  • Crusader Kings II: The Republic
  • Crusader Kings II: Rajas of India
  • Crusader Kings II: The Old Gods
  • Crusader Kings II: Legacy of Rome
  • Crusader Kings II
  • Stellaris: Synthetic Dawn
Very exciting developments all around this world :)

Only Japan seems more or less free from acute worry.

May 22 – In the Combined Syndicates of America, a 42,000-pound Mark 17 atomic bomb accidentally falls from a bomber near Albuquerque.
Wasn't Albuquerque and all of new Mexico part of the Mexican state?
 

Health

Major
95 Badges
Feb 8, 2014
652
232
  • Crusader Kings II
  • Victoria 2: A House Divided
  • Victoria 2: Heart of Darkness
  • Europa Universalis IV: Common Sense
  • Hearts of Iron III: Their Finest Hour
  • Hearts of Iron III
  • Darkest Hour
  • Crusader Kings II: Reapers Due
  • Surviving Mars: First Colony Edition
  • Cities: Skylines - Parklife Pre-Order
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Expansion Pass
  • Victoria 2
  • Warlock: Master of the Arcane
  • War of the Roses
  • Cities: Skylines
  • Europa Universalis III: Collection
  • Europa Universalis IV: Mandate of Heaven
  • Crusader Kings II: Holy Fury
  • Magicka: Wizard Wars Founder Wizard
  • Crusader Kings II: Way of Life
  • Humble Paradox Bundle
  • Magicka 2
  • Crusader Kings II: Horse Lords
  • Europa Universalis IV: Rule Britannia
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Cadet
  • Crusader Kings II: Conclave
  • Hearts of Iron IV Sign-up
  • Stellaris Sign-up
  • Cities: Skylines - Mass Transit
  • Cities: Skylines - Green Cities
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Together for Victory
  • Europa Universalis IV: Golden Century
  • Europa Universalis IV: Dharma
  • Stellaris: Leviathans Story Pack
  • Stellaris: Apocalypse
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Death or Dishonor
  • Stellaris: Digital Anniversary Edition
  • Hearts of Iron IV: La Resistance
  • Age of Wonders: Planetfall Sign Up
  • Stellaris: Distant Stars
  • Stellaris: Lithoids
  • Crusader Kings II: Monks and Mystics
  • Cities: Skylines - Natural Disasters
  • Stellaris: Humanoids Species Pack
  • Surviving Mars
  • Europa Universalis IV: Rights of Man
  • Shadowrun: Dragonfall
  • Shadowrun Returns
  • Cities: Skylines - Parklife
Let's hope that Germans will win the space race. After all, CSA has probably sent some of its scientists to reeducation camps.
At least for the moment it is only racing itself.

Nothing clever to say today; just want to let you know I'm still following :)
Still glad to have you.

Very exciting developments all around this world :)

Only Japan seems more or less free from acute worry.


Wasn't Albuquerque and all of new Mexico part of the Mexican state?
Errr.... Yeah, my bad. Didn't do a final check and it somehow slipped through. My bad. Thanks for pointing a mistake out again.

As to worries, sometimes the creeping ones can do more harm than the acute ones.
 

Health

Major
95 Badges
Feb 8, 2014
652
232
  • Crusader Kings II
  • Victoria 2: A House Divided
  • Victoria 2: Heart of Darkness
  • Europa Universalis IV: Common Sense
  • Hearts of Iron III: Their Finest Hour
  • Hearts of Iron III
  • Darkest Hour
  • Crusader Kings II: Reapers Due
  • Surviving Mars: First Colony Edition
  • Cities: Skylines - Parklife Pre-Order
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Expansion Pass
  • Victoria 2
  • Warlock: Master of the Arcane
  • War of the Roses
  • Cities: Skylines
  • Europa Universalis III: Collection
  • Europa Universalis IV: Mandate of Heaven
  • Crusader Kings II: Holy Fury
  • Magicka: Wizard Wars Founder Wizard
  • Crusader Kings II: Way of Life
  • Humble Paradox Bundle
  • Magicka 2
  • Crusader Kings II: Horse Lords
  • Europa Universalis IV: Rule Britannia
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Cadet
  • Crusader Kings II: Conclave
  • Hearts of Iron IV Sign-up
  • Stellaris Sign-up
  • Cities: Skylines - Mass Transit
  • Cities: Skylines - Green Cities
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Together for Victory
  • Europa Universalis IV: Golden Century
  • Europa Universalis IV: Dharma
  • Stellaris: Leviathans Story Pack
  • Stellaris: Apocalypse
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Death or Dishonor
  • Stellaris: Digital Anniversary Edition
  • Hearts of Iron IV: La Resistance
  • Age of Wonders: Planetfall Sign Up
  • Stellaris: Distant Stars
  • Stellaris: Lithoids
  • Crusader Kings II: Monks and Mystics
  • Cities: Skylines - Natural Disasters
  • Stellaris: Humanoids Species Pack
  • Surviving Mars
  • Europa Universalis IV: Rights of Man
  • Shadowrun: Dragonfall
  • Shadowrun Returns
  • Cities: Skylines - Parklife
1958 - Humane Divinity

Although the birth of a child into the Imperial Family was no rare thing, the fact that by 1933 the Emperor had been blessed with four daughters, but yet no son and heir had the public both worried and excited. All of this came to ahead on the 23rd of December 1933, when in the Tokyo Imperial Palace a boy was born. News of the joyous event quickly spread across the land, causing much rejoicing. Whilst the Imperial couple would later have two more kids, including another son, their births could hardly live up to the birth of the heir apparent. The Prince was named Tsugunomiya Akihito, by his father the Emperor, based on an imperial edict issued upon the ascension of the Meiji Emperor, officially proclaiming the Emperor divine and Shinto as the state faith of Japan. Although the Prince himself was too young to remember it, the 1-21 Incident as well as the Imperial ascent given to the 1937 Reforms would massively influence his early life and through it the fate of the entire Imperial Line. The earliest indications of this massive change came when the prince turned 2, the age from which the future Emperor would be educated away from court. In a move that shocked senior officers in the Army and the Navy the Prince was handed off to the Dowager Empress Tenmei and civilian tutors, who would play a vital role in shaping the mind of the young prince. This was also interpreted by many as Imperial wrath directed at scheming officers, although never officially worded as such. This grudge would once again rear its head when Akihito turned 10 years of age. According to the 'Law on Royal Status' upon turning 10 the Crown Prince is to be commissioned in both the Army and the Navy. Despite this however the Emperor expressed his desire that no such titles be bequeathed upon the Crown Prince during audience given to the Prime Minister at the time. Although the Emperor had not necessarily demanded that all subsequent Crown Princes be released from this ceremony, he was nonetheless willing to give it a pass after being notified of the change in the law.


The birth of the Crown Prince was a much awaited event even leading to the creation of a celebratory songs
Upon turning 7, the Prince returned to the Imperial Court and like other descendants of the Japanese aristocracy was enrolled into Gakushūin, attending it for the whole length of his academic career. Whilst in school Akihito was almost always at the centre of attention often for reasons other than his heritage. These ranged from athletics, whether it be kendo in elementary school or equestrianism in high school, the Prince excelled at sports. The same was true about academics, where the efforts of his tutors had seemingly born fruit. However many classmates at the time would later claim that standing out seemed to annoy the Prince. Claiming that he wanted nothing more than to live the life of a normal student. This theory is given credence by multiple events of Akihito attempting to evade his guards in order to rub shoulders with the common people. The most famous of these events happened in 1952, where after an exam session the Prince with the aid of two of his friends Hashimoto Akira and Senge Takahiko eluded the royal escort and took to the streets of Ginza. The trio would soon be joined by Hashimoto's girlfriend managing to visit a number of cafés before being caught and thoroughly reprimanded. The school time adventures of the Prince would later be compiled into the novel 'The Solitary Man' by Fujishima Taisuke, another classmate. The book, released in 1956, became immensely popular, although also a target of extreme scrutiny, and did much to endear the Crown Prince to public. It also solidified Akihito as the personification of the Japanese Empire. The Prince would seemingly remain in the papers for the length of 1952, despite attempts by Akihito to avoid any press, as the Ginza incident was soon followed by his graduation from high school, enrolment into the Political Science department of Gakushūin University and the official ceremony for his proclamation as as Crown Prince on the 10th of November.


Crown Prince Akihito and Prince Masahito in the countryside during summer,
the Crown Prince had left the capitol but still found himself
constantly hounded by the press
Despite this Akihito would continue to attempt to avoid the press whenever not forced to do so by official duties. This however did little to hinder public appetite about his comings and goings. Bereft of any new information the discussions would often return to the topic of the future bride of the 'Loner Prince'. Whilst the list of possible partners seemed to expand like yeast, very little of substance could ever be extracted. The silence was finally broken on the 27th of November 1958, when the Imperial Household Ministry announced the engagement of the Crown Prince to one Shōda Michiko. The announcement took the public by complete surpriseas did the official press release detailing how the young couple had met as well as a summary on the future Crown Princess. A short summary of the official story of their meeting follows.

The two first met whilst summering in Karuizawa, Nagano Prefecture. During their stay there both decided on attending the local tennis tournament and chanced upon each other falling in love at first sight, as if a higher power was at play. They would subsequently deepen their relationship through tennis, which provided an easy excuse for both to see one another. However in the Autumn of 1958, Michiko was sent away to Brussels to attend an international conference of the Alumnae du Sacré-Cœur. The Crown Prince was however unconcerned with the distance and remained determined to keep in contact with his girlfriend. This show of devotion reportedly moved the Emperor so much that he decided to give the marriage his blessing.
The story instantly became a media circus with the press presenting it as a 'real life fairy tale'. The public long since starved for information on the doings of the Crown Prince also jumped onto the trend enthusiastically accepting the Crown Princess to be. The announcement of a wedding in the Spring of next year combined with the massive public support would kickstart the so-called 'Michi Boom', which would subsequently bury what remained of the image of the 'Loner Prince'.


Although far from an unknown figure, nobody among the public had expected the Crown Prince
to choose Shōda Michiko, but accepted her warmly regardless.

Despite overwhelming public support many traditionalists remained strongly critical of the marriage. Perhaps the loudest among them being the writer Mishima Yukio, who unbeknownst to the public had at one point been introduced to Michiko as a potential husband. The literarian wrote scathing articles criticizing the 'Windsorification' of the Imperial Family and attacked it for abandoning its divine dignity by connecting to the people. Mishima would also go onto claim that these activities were a threat to the kokutai and would only give strength to the revolutionaries seeking to overthrow the Imperial Family. Whilst most other traditionalists remained more reserved in their criticism, criticizing her for her perceived Roman Catholic sympathies or perceived membership in the church as well as the fact that she was too low-born, many began to see Mishima as the only one brave enough to word what others were thinking. These factors were a bit more disconcerting for the public as almost everybody had expected for the bride would be selected out of the families of the court nobility or other branches of the Imperial Family. Similarly Christian influence over the Imperial Family was seen as disconcerting. However the fact that the Emperor had seemingly given the marriage his blessing seemed to put most of these worries to rest among the public. Despite this theories quickly arose on whether the Emperor had truly been moved by the attempts of the Crown Prince to keep in contact with Michiko or whether this was an attempt to cover-up something. Reports at the time seem to suggest that the Prince Baudoin and King Edward IX had been instrumental in convincing the Emperor to allow the marriage, stating that the Crown Prince would make a better Emperor, if he is happy with Michiko. Prince Baudoin had also been noted as the person passing on Akihito's letters to Michiko. The Amagi Incident and the promotion of monogamy, the latter a topic dear to the Emperor, were also thought to have weighed on the mind of the Emperor.


The approval of the Emperor did little to sway the opinions of the old aristocracy giving cause to rumours that
Empress Kōjun was strongly against the union and had beseeched the Emperor with Princesses Chichibu and Takamatsu.

Excecutive summary of 'Crown Prince Akihito - Face of a Nation'

-----------------------------------------

January

January 4 – Trabant 1 falls out of orbit and burns up on reentry into the atmosphere.
January 18 - The first of Leonard Bernstein's Young Syndicalists Concerts with the New York Philharmonic is telecast by CBS. It will make Bernstein's name a household word, and the most famous conductor in the Combined Syndicates.
January 27 – In the Combined Syndicates of America, an executive agreement on cultural, educational and scientific exchanges between Canada, Britain and America is reached. This treaty will form the groundwork for a wide-range of exchanges including student exchanges between all the Syndicalist states under the aegis of the World Federation of Democratic Youth.
January 28 - In Denmark, Godtfred Kirk Christiansen files a patent for the iconic plastic Lego brick.


Logo of the World Federation of Democratic Youth, a front-organization
as well as de-facto youth wing of the Syndicalist Internationale.

February

February 11 - The strongest ever known solar maximum is recorded.
February 16 - The Blue Wave incident, Korean nationalists hijack the Sourou-go, a Nakajima L2D belonging to All Japan Airways, enroute between Keijō and Shanghai diverting it to Qingdao. Chinese officials take the plane as well as its crew and passengers into custody. The hijackers however escape, prompting outrage in Japan and further demands to 'deal' with the former German concessions, which have seemingly become a faucet for destabilizing Korea, Manchuria and Northern China.
February 17 – Pope Pius XII declares Saint Clare of Assisi the patron saint of television.
February 20 – In the Combined Syndicates of America, a test rocket explodes at Cape Canaveral.
February 24 - Worsening weather conditions force the abandonment of the Second Japanese Antarctic Winter Expedition leaving 15 Karafuto dogs chained up and abandoned of the Antarctic.


Although unsuccessful at first the Combined Syndicates of America
would manage their first successful rocket launch within 1958.

March

March 1 - In Turkey, the passenger ship Üsküdar capsizes in the Gulf of İzmit and sinks, killing around 300.
March 10 - In Austria, Social Democratic Workers' Party under the leadership of Adolf Schärf breaks the decades long dominance of the Christian-Democrats in the general election. Along with the regular promises of expanding the welfare state, its harsh stance against foreign intervention gains the party many votes.
March 12 – The list of countries participating in the Eurovision Song Contest grows once more, now including Sweden. 'Dors, mon amour', performed by French singer André Claveau. The competition in 1958 also establishes the tradition that the winning country of the previous year will host the competition.
March 25 – In the Syndicalist Republic of Canada, the FDB-105 Arrow, a product of cooperation between the scientists of the leading Syndcalist countries makes its maiden flight.
March 27 - In the Union of Britain, the film 'Run Silent, Run Deep' is released. The story describes submarine warfare in the Atlantic Ocean during the peak of the Syndicalist War.


The innability of the Christian-Democrats to successfully respond to the growing crisis in the Eastern provinces
of the Empire lead to a victory for the Schärf, a veteran of the Weltkrieg who argued for a stronghanded response.

April

April 1 – In the Union of Britain, the BBC Radiophonic Workshop is established.
April 6 – Soraya Esfandiary-Bakhtiari divorces the Shah of Iran, Mohammad Reza Pahlavi after she is unable to produce any children.
April 10 – The German Empire launches the Trabant 3 satellite, which has a transmitter more than twice as powerful as the first Trabant with longer lasting batteries. In addition to gathering geodetic data from its orbit, the satellite also carries numerous scientific instruments.
April 14 - The satellite Trabant 2 disintegrates during reentry from orbit.
April 17 – Princes Baudoin and Wilhelm officially open the world's fair in Brussels, also known as Expo 58.


Demonstrating European recovery from the Syndicalist War, the Atomium formed the centerpiece of the world expo.
May

May 2 - In Nagasaki, the flag of the Republic of China is torn down during an exhibition put on by the Japan-China Friendship Association. The move is seen as a reaction to the Blue Wave incident by domestic right-wing radicals.
May 9 – In the Combined Syndicates of America, actor-singer Paul Robeson sings in a sold-out one-man recital at Reed Memorial Hall. Although the recital is huge success, which forces him to give another one a few days later, Robeson leaves the CSA just a few weeks after for London. His concerts are later released on records.
May 28 – Real Madrid beats A.C. Milan 3–2 at Heysel Stadium in Brussels. This victory assures their third European Cup title.
May 30 – In the Combined Syndicates of America, the bodies of unidentified CSA soldiers, killed in action during the Second American Civil War and the Syndicalist War are buried at the Tomb of the Unknown at Arlington.


Americans queuing to pay their respects at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.
June

June 1 - The Icelandic Socialist Republic extends its fishing limits to 12 miles, sparking outrage in the Union of Britain.
June 10 - Fishermen demanding restitution from damages sustained from dumping wastewater by the Honshu Paper Edogawa Mill clash with riot police. 143 fishermen are injured and 8 are arrested, one policeman is also hospitalized.
June 20 – The iron barque Omega sinks on passage carrying guano from the Pachacamac Islands for Huacho, Peru. She is the world's last full-rigged ship trading under sail alone having been built in Scotland in 1887.
June 29 – In Sweden, Brazil beats Sweden 5–2 winning the football World Cup.


British trawlers fishing under the defence of warships off the coast of Iceland.
July

July 9 – 1958 Lituya Bay megatsunami: A 7.8 Mw strike-slip earthquake in Southeast Alaska causes a landslide that produces a megatsunami. The runup from the waves reaches 525 m on the rim of Lituya Bay.
July 11 - In the Union of Britain, the Scottish serial killer Peter Manuel, "The Beast of Birkenshaw", is hanged in Glasgow, for the murder of 7 people.
July 12 - The Quarrymen, pay 17 shillings and 6 pence to have their first recording session where they record "In Spite of All the Danger", a song written by Paul McCartney and George Harrison.
July 26 - Princess Elizabeth is invested as Prince of Wales and New South Wales by Edward IX. The decision raises many questions in Australia and New Zealand about the well-being of the young king.


American and British cultural exchange had once again deepened following the victory of the CSA
in the Second Civil War leading to the resurgence of jazz and skiffle among the British public

August
August 1 - Following the death of Zapata, Vicente Lombardo Toledano is elected the next president of Mexico. Although initially seen as a candidate capable of mending fences with the Atlantic Treaty Organization, Toledano doubles down on Zapata's reconciliatory policies with the local Anglos, angering the Combined Syndicates of America.
August 12 - All Japan Airways Flight 25 from Tokyo to Nagoya crashe off Shimoda City, killing all 33 people aboard.
August 18 - Vladimir Nabokov's controversial novel Lolita is published in Germany.
August 25 - In Japan, the "Chicken Ramen", the first instant ramen in the world is released. Produced by Nissin Foods, founded by Momofuku Ando a native of Taiwan, the food proves popular among the public despite its seemingly high cost.
August 27 – Operation Argus: The German Empire begins nuclear tests over the South Atlantic.



Proclaimed the 'dean of Mexican Marxism', Toledano had earned himself the ire of the international
Syndicalist community due to his support for the SRI and opposition to Anglo-American leadership

September

September 6 – Paul Robeson performs in concert at the British Young Pioneer camp Windmill Hill.
September 13 - In the Empire of Japan, construction of the Tokyo Tower is completed.
September 15 - In Japan, Asahi Breweries releases the first canned beer in the country.
September 27 - Typhoon Kanogawa makes landfall in Kanagawa Prefecture, killing at least 1,269 people.


Inspired greatly by the Eiffel Tower the Tokyo Tower soon became a
landmark of the city
as well as the tallest tower in the world, beating out its source of inspiration by 9 meters.
October

October 1 - In Japan, the first sleeper express train 'Asakaze' begins operation.
October 8 - Mass demonstrations break-out in the Qing Empire ahead of Double Ten Day. Qing and Japanese officials interpret the reemergence of protests as a byproduct of worsening Sino-Japanese relations.
October 16 – The long-running BBC Television children's programme Blue Peter is first broadcast.
October 28 – Pope John XXIII succeeds Pope Pius XII as the 261st pope. The later had died earlier on the 9th of October.


Unexpectedly elected the Pope, many saw John XXIII as little more
than a caretaker due to continuing Austrian pressure.

November

November 1-3 - King Faisal II of Arabia and other members of the Hashemite family are killed in an attempted coup. Following suppression of the coup by loyalist and Egyptian forces, King Muhammad Abdel of Egypt is proclaimed King of Arabia. He declares the creation of the Arab Federation.
November 10 – In Rio de Janeiro, the recording of Chega de Saudade by João Gilberto marks the birth of bossa nova.
November 23 – The radio drama Have Gun – Will Travel premieres in the Combined Syndicates. The show is one of many new Red Westerns and highlights the resurging American nationalism and rephrased manifest destiny.
November 27 - The Imperial Household Agency announces the engagement of Crown Prince Akihito and Shōda Michiko.


A crowd of men watch in shock at the news of the deposition of the Hashemite family.
December

December 5 - Chairman Oswald Mosely personally inspects and opens the United Kingdom's first ever motorway, the Preston Bypass, to traffic for the first time. 11 months later the M1, M45 and M10 Motorways open.
December 18 - Germany launches the world's first communications satellite.
December 27 - In Japan the National Health Insurance Law is totally revised to provide universal coverage to all citizens. Coming to existance first in 1938 as a law providing coverage to farmers and others those left uncovered by the Health Insurance Act of 1923.
December 30 – The Centroamerican Air Force fires on Mexican fishing boats which had strayed into Centroamerican territory, triggering a breakdown in Mexican–Centroamerican relations. The event seems to cement the Centroamericans in the camp of the Atlantic Treaty Organization amid worsening relations between Mexico and the rest of the Syndicalist world.


Centroamerican aircraft strikes a direct hit at a Mexican fishing traweler.
 
  • 2Love
Reactions:

JodelDiplom

Field Marshal
22 Badges
Apr 5, 2013
3.940
1.498
  • Crusader Kings II: Horse Lords
  • Stellaris: Megacorp
  • Stellaris: Distant Stars
  • Stellaris: Apocalypse
  • Stellaris: Humanoids Species Pack
  • Stellaris - Path to Destruction bundle
  • Stellaris: Leviathans Story Pack
  • Stellaris: Digital Anniversary Edition
  • Stellaris
  • Crusader Kings II: Conclave
  • Crusader Kings II: Way of Life
  • Crusader Kings II: Charlemagne
  • Deus Vult
  • Crusader Kings II: Sword of Islam
  • Crusader Kings II: Sunset Invasion
  • Crusader Kings II: Sons of Abraham
  • Crusader Kings II: The Republic
  • Crusader Kings II: Rajas of India
  • Crusader Kings II: The Old Gods
  • Crusader Kings II: Legacy of Rome
  • Crusader Kings II
  • Stellaris: Synthetic Dawn
Uh-oh, that's not going to end well for Mexico! Someone's got to sit them down for a proper Marxist-Mosleyist-Reedist education. With Browderist characteristics
 

Maciej-Kamil

Captain
13 Badges
Jul 12, 2013
434
40
  • Crusader Kings II
  • Crusader Kings II: Legacy of Rome
  • Crusader Kings II: The Old Gods
  • Crusader Kings II: The Republic
  • Crusader Kings II: Sunset Invasion
  • Crusader Kings II: Sword of Islam
  • Darkest Hour
  • For the Motherland
  • Hearts of Iron III
  • Hearts of Iron III: Their Finest Hour
  • Semper Fi
  • Victoria 2
Oswald Mosely personally inspects and opens the United Kingdom
Princess Elizabeth is invested as Prince of Wales and New South Wales by Edward IX. The decision raises many questions in Australia and New Zealand about the well-being of the young king.
Do Mosley and the King know something that we don't?

The show is one of many new Red Westerns and highlights the resurging American nationalism and rephrased manifest destiny.
I really like that buildup to CSA-Mexican war, and the way in which it connects with CSA's culture in that quote.

I liked the whole chapter, Japanese heir's marriage was well-written. I also liked that part about Irish-British fishing tensions, which shows that Irealnd is still Ireland, not Mosley's puppet.