• Crusader Kings III Available Now!

    The realm rejoices as Paradox Interactive announces the launch of Crusader Kings III, the latest entry in the publisher’s grand strategy role-playing game franchise. Advisors may now jockey for positions of influence and adversaries should save their schemes for another day, because on this day Crusader Kings III can be purchased on Steam, the Paradox Store, and other major online retailers.


    Real Strategy Requires Cunning
Chapter 20 – October 1945
  • Bullfilter

    Old Boardgame Grognard
    29 Badges
    Aug 31, 2008
    6.536
    1.265
    • Crusader Kings II
    • Europa Universalis: Rome
    • Hearts of Iron III
    • Hearts of Iron IV: Cadet
    • Rome: Vae Victis
    • 500k Club
    • Crusader Kings II: Way of Life
    • Crusader Kings II: Horse Lords
    • Crusader Kings II: Conclave
    • Hearts of Iron IV: Colonel
    • Crusader Kings II: Reapers Due
    • Hearts of Iron IV: Together for Victory
    • Crusader Kings II: Monks and Mystics
    • Hearts of Iron IV: Death or Dishonor
    • Hearts of Iron IV: Expansion Pass
    • Hearts of Iron IV: Expansion Pass
    • Rome Gold
    • Semper Fi
    • Hearts of Iron III Collection
    • Hearts of Iron III: Their Finest Hour
    • For the Motherland
    • Crusader Kings II: Sword of Islam
    • Crusader Kings II: Sunset Invasion
    • Crusader Kings II: Sons of Abraham
    • Crusader Kings II: The Republic
    • Crusader Kings II: Rajas of India
    • Crusader Kings II: The Old Gods
    • Crusader Kings II: Legacy of Rome
    • Crusader Kings II: Charlemagne
    Chapter 20 – October 1945

    AuthAAR’s Notes: Given we’re now past the end date of WW2 in OTL and this still has some way to go, I’m going to keep trimming and streamlining the presentation to keep things moving along more quickly. In game terms, I’m giving myself until no later than the day of Stalin’s OTL death to either get my win (12 objectives), or it stops then and we see how we have done. Which gives plenty of time yet, of course. I hope I don’t need it all!

    Basically, the combat descriptions will be trimmed down further, as I now think the summary maps give most of the information needed to get the sweep, sequence and size of engagements by sector and across the front. I’ll just briefly note the biggest battles each month by sector. The focus of the rest remains on the ‘sinews of war’ and strategic aspects that I control as the player.


    ******

    1. Introduction and Command Arrangements

    As September ended, the only continuing battle was a Soviet attack on Telemba (Central Sector in this update) [69% progress].

    In overall terms, at midnight on 1 November the orders to all four of the Eastern armies were to adopt an attacking ground stance and go on the air offensive, countermanding the mistakenly defensive orders that had prevailed the previous month.

    ******

    2. Northern Sector

    This was the busiest sector for the month, with a major Soviet advance along the Pacific Coast and its hinterland. After the battle for Bomnaksk was fought and won on 1 October, the advance continued with determination, pushing through to Fevral’sk, Gulian and Tugur by the end of the month. Air support had been active but generally not heavy during this time. Skovorodino was taken late in the month after one failed attempt earlier in the month, but the Japanese were still counter-attacking as the month ended.

    Interestingly, in this sector Japan won three of the four largest battles, but the Soviets managed to win most of the rest, sometimes taking a few attempts to prevail. The first Soviet attack on Skovorodino (8-13 October) cost 1,454 Soviet attackers and 1,452 Japanese defenders. The first battle for Torom (11-15 October) saw 1,461 Soviet and 1,114 Japanese soldiers killed, but a later attack was successful against the weakened defenders.

    The Soviets won at the first attempt in Fevral’sk (22-26 October), losing only 763 men to 1,692 of the enemy, even if it took a subsequent attack to dislodge a fresh Japanese lodgement from 26-27 October. Finally, the biggest battle of the month was for Zeya, between 24-28 October, where 1,809 Soviet soldiers made the ultimate sacrifice, taking 1,569 of the enemy with them. But a renewed attack was in progress as the month ended.

    By 23 October, the forward air base at Tyndinskiy housed 11 Soviet air wings (4 x CAS, 4 x INT, 1 x MR, 2 x TAC), even though (after an upgrade during the month) it only had the facilities to repair 2.43 wings at a time, but at least it meant the men in this sector were getting regular air support again.

    Up in the Far North, as the month was drawing to a close there was only one Japanese division left in the pocket. Noticing that no-one was attacking it, 6th Army had its objectives updated, deleting the now liberated Okhotsk and substituting Magadan.


    General Shestapalov responded quickly to his orders: an attack began just two hours later, with the enemy driven off later that day after a short skirmish.


    Operational summary, Far East – Northern Sector (not including the Magadan Pocket), October 1945.

    ******

    3. Central Sector

    This sector saw less fighting than in the North, but some large actions were fought and an initial salient into the Japanese lines had been significantly expanded as October drew to a close.

    First, the orders of 1st Army were amended, as Bukacaca had finally been secured in September. It was replaced with a depth objective well beyond the now intermediate objective of Mildigun. If 1st Army continued to show initiative, it may get a corps reassigned from 7th or 15th Army (which it shared the sector with) in November to give it the strength to achieve larger gains.


    And indeed, by 28 October, 1st Army units had advanced to the border of Mildigun, brushed away its defenders and were advancing on it as the month ended. In this sector, the only battles lost were a couple of skirmishes. The main focus of fighting had been over Telemba, which took two successful attacks to secure, followed by a defence against a sustained Japanese counter-attack. That ended up being the heaviest battle of the month in the Centre, lasting from 13-17 October, with only 187 Soviet defenders lost against 1,096 Japanese attackers, while the VVS struck the attackers in Olovyarmaya with four days of raids killing 2,021 enemy troops.

    As the month ended, the Japanese won a battle to retake Ust’ Karsk, but had not yet reoccupied it.


    Operational summary, Far East – Central Sector, October 1945.

    ******

    4. Southern Sector

    Results in the South were more mixed than the month before, but still positive on balance. Although sometimes limited by supply issues in Irkutsk, the VVS wings based there delivered some heavy air support at times, even it failed to prevent two major Japanese victories in Selenga Burin and Serguleng.

    The two most significant battles in the sector during the month were both defensive defeats for the Soviets. In Selenga Burin (1-5 October), the Soviets lost 920 men to ground combat, while the Japanese lost 829, though air strikes took a heavy toll on attacking enemy troops in both Altan Bulak (2,883) and Petrovsk Zabaykal'skiy (2,341). But the Soviet defenders were outnumbered throughout and were out of supply until 2 October, which had hampered their defence (see more on supply in Section 7 below).

    After the battle for Selenga Burin was lost on 5 October, it was added to 7th Army’s objective list but no Soviet counter-attack materialised after it was occupied by the enemy on 14 October.


    Serguleng had been taken from the Japanese on 16 October after a victory there in September. A first Japanese counter-attack from Selenga Burin and Ulaanbataar was beaten off from 16-18 October. But a second attack (21-25 October), despite even heavier defensive air support, forced the Soviets out. There were ground combat losses of 1,066 Soviet and 1,157 Japanese troops, plus another enemy 2,780 killed in air raids on troops attacking from Selenga Burin and 745 in Ulaanbataar.

    Serguleng remained in Japanese hands by the end of the month though the Japanese forces reoccupying it were defeated as they arrived on 29 October, so the province may change hands yet again in early November. Gains were made by Soviet and Comintern forces to the south, in Muren and Santu.


    Operational summary, Far East – Southern Sector, October 1945.

    ******

    5. Finland

    On 21 October, another widespread revolt broke out in Finland, affected eight provinces initially and spreading rapidly in the next few days, until responding Soviet units started to roll back these early gains.


    Based on previous expert advice, a theatre boundary change made since the last revolt meant only Archangelsk Theatre troops would be affected, rather than the unnecessary mass depopulation of the German-Polish sector that had occurred the last time.


    By 1000hr on 21 October, the Theatre Commander Marshal Karmanov had been ordered to adopt an attacking stance (perhaps imitating the action of a tiger? ;) ) to crush the rebellion. After two days of the rebels rapidly fanning out into the central Finnish countryside, the entire northern garrison along the Swedish and Norwegian borders was in trucks heading south as fast as they could make it, while two nearby divisions in the south marched to action.


    The cancer of counter-revolution had spread widely by 26 October, when Soviet forces first engaged the Finns in the south at Juva, then on 28 October in Lahti and by 31 October at Kuopio, with the first of the northern forces arriving and attacking. All these ‘battles’ were little more than skirmishes against guerrilla brigades, typically costing a dozen of fewer Soviet casualties for around 130 Finns.


    Operational summary, Finland, 21-31 October 1945.

    ******

    6. Espionage

    The spy war hotted up considerably in October. In Spain, the Republic’s counter-espionage forces remained strong and active, but the Soviets decided to ‘test the waters’ on 4 October by devoting a quarter of their effort to supporting the local Communist Party.


    But with one of the Soviet teams being neutralised on 6 October and Spanish domestic spy strength still at seven teams, this brief experiment was discontinued for the time being.

    In Turkey though, local counter-espionage was minimal (one team) and on 12 October all Soviet efforts were directed into supporting the local Communists, who started from a low base of only 7% popularity. But with heavier losses elsewhere, especially in Japan, and reserve teams down to just two to cover four active missions, spy training was increased from 1.2 to 1.5 leadership, with a small amount shaved from diplomacy and the rest from officer training (officers currently at reasonably healthy 117%).

    But the losses mounted: by 16 October the reserve was down to one team and the spy effort was doubled to 3.0 LS, with 1 LS coming from the deferral of one research project (now only 21 out of 22 supported), the rest taken from officer training.

    On 17 October, a team was lost in Turkey, so the effort there was dialled back to 50% each on counter-espionage and Communist Party support. Another research project was put on hold on 18 October as losses mounted and the reserve hovered on just one team, boosting spy training to 4.0 LS.

    Then on 22 October the Manchurians captured a Soviet team, so the effort there was also adjusted from 100% on disrupting national unity to a 50/50 mix with counter-espionage. But despite these losses, the new training focus had taken effect, with the reserve up to three teams.

    The reserve was up to five and another Japanese team had been captured by 29 October (leaving them with two after a brutal month of tit-for-tat killings), so a 50/50 split between counter-espionage and national unity disruption was resumed.

    The Japanese Kempeitai started the month with three teams and finished with two, adding three but losing four to Soviet action, but the Soviets lost three teams of their own achieving this. Japanese national unity remained steady at 64.5%, as Soviet disruption only resumed as the month was ending.

    Manchukuo started the month with no teams at home and finished with two, adding two and losing none, while eliminating two Soviet teams. Manchurian national unity had however decreased by 0.8% from 65.8% to 65.0%.

    Turkey started and finished with one team, adding and losing one during the month, while neutralising two Soviet agents. But the Communist Party in Turkey had been boosted from 7% to 10% popularity by the end of the month.

    In Spain, the locals started with seven teams, losing two and adding one to finish with six, eliminating three Soviet teams along the way. Local Communist Party popularity had not yet budged, remaining at 12%.

    At home and abroad, 33 enemy agents were neutralised in October, compared to 35 in September. As mentioned above the Japanese had lost four (though these were all presumed to have been in Japan), with the British and Germans losing three each, Spain two (in Spain), the rest one each.

    The Soviets had lost ten agents and but produced thirteen five new teams in September, leaving them with a reserve of seven by 31 October. With a more comfortable buffer re-established, one of the deferred research projects would likely be restarted, in part of full.

    ******

    7. Production and Supply

    The air base in Jakutsk received its final upgrade on 4 October: the front was moving further forward, so the saved IC was rolled into ‘consolidated revenue’ for now.

    As noted earlier, supply was still problematic on parts of the front, with the defence of Selenga Burin still being affected by 4 October, though marginal supply had been restored. Part of the problem there was caused by low infrastructure. Also, the routing of supplies was a bit confusing: logisticians declared their supply route back to Moscow was 135 nodes away, while Ulan Ude (directly north of it, albeit on the Trans-Siberian Railway, so with much better infrastructure) was supposedly only 126 distant. Supply in the Vershino Darasunsky salient was still also difficult, though fuel was plentiful. This would improve during the month. [NB: I'm not sure what the difference, if any, is between a 'node' and a 'province' in this context.]


    On 10 October, US Lend-Lease was reduced to 93 IC (down almost 30 from its earlier peak), a rate that would continue for the rest of the month, keeping the introduction of new production projects suppressed.

    The air base at Tyndinsky – the new front-line centre for the VVS in the Northern Sector – got its level three expansion on 15 October, with improvements continued at the crowded facility.


    All the massive new infrastructure projects for the TSR and the Far East Front were completed on 20-21 October. It would take a while for them to reach full efficiency. With high supply demand (around 135 IC average), Lend-Lease reduced and the upgrade bill climbing (back up to 37.47 IC), only two new infrastructure projects were started, to start improving the TSR beyond Irkutsk as land was securely liberated.


    Some of the freed IC was put into raising a second full marine division.


    And a few days later, another wing of strategic bombers was ordered.


    Though more research gains meant the upgrade bill climbed even higher by 27 October (to 50.66 IC), though supply production had been reduced to around 110 IC, meaning the bomber production would not always been at 100% capacity as variable demands fluctuated.

    ******

    8. Research and Leadership

    With another improvement being implanted for the artillery brigades, focus was put into bringing heavy tank engine technology closer to world standards – the French in particular were known to have focussed on their heavy armour, while of course the Germans were famous for it.


    On 14 October, the strategic bomber arm got improved bombs, with the effort there switching to introducing the first large air search radar for the VVS.


    The next day, land doctrine for the special forces was improved and research in that priority ‘niche’ area was continued.


    Medium tank reliability was researched on 18 October and while it was planned to continue, as noted above spy losses abroad were impacting heavily at that point, so it and special forces research were put on temporary hold, with large air search radar elevated above them in priority.


    The next breakthrough was on 26 October, with small navigation radar researched and also elevated to continue above the two suspended projects.



    ******

    9. Theatre Summaries

    The Far Eastern Theatre saw major Soviet gains on the Pacific side of the front, fair gains in the centre and modest net gains in the south.


    The Soviet army remained close to encroaching on northern Manchuria, but had not crossed into it yet. The Japanese still maintained a continuous front line, even if the coastal sector was back-pedalling significantly. A small encirclement might be possible east of Lake Baikal.


    Total confirmed Soviet losses in land combat were very similar (down just slightly) compared to September at 10,686, with none lost to Japanese aircraft.

    The Japanese and their puppets lost 17,921 men (a couple of hundred more fewer than in September) in ground combat. But losses from Soviet air strikes were up significantly to 18,747 (8,187 more than in September). Total Axis casualties (including a few hundred in Finland again) were therefore 36,668, or 10,757 more than in September (though with no repeat of the massive POW haul in Ayan last month).

    ******

    The Finnish revolt had seized a large swathe of the hinterland, but the containment operation had now begun a week or so after the initial rising. Next would come its destruction. And maybe a few MP units might be needed to keep a lid on things in the future.



    ******

    In South East Asia, the Allied conquest of the Philippines had been completed, but Singapore had been lost again. Nothing much had changed elsewhere.


    The Allies were currently relying on the Thais in Malaya, but their criminally negligent failure to garrison Singapore had led to its loss.


    The considerable French-commanded forces now in the southern Philippines were in the process of relocating, but time would tell how many were left as a garrison and where the others would end up. Perhaps some back to Malaya, others to new adventures.



    ******

    The Japanese defences had collapsed in Australia by mid-month. Some remnants were now pocketed, the rest heading towards Adelaide [which, in-game, inexplicably does not include a port – though that is good for the Allies now]. Canberra had been retaken in the first half of the month and re-established as the capital.


    Midway Island now seemed at last to be properly defended, with three garrison divisions, fighters and bombers.

     
    Last edited:
    • 3Like
    Reactions:
    Chapter 21 – November 1945
  • Bullfilter

    Old Boardgame Grognard
    29 Badges
    Aug 31, 2008
    6.536
    1.265
    • Crusader Kings II
    • Europa Universalis: Rome
    • Hearts of Iron III
    • Hearts of Iron IV: Cadet
    • Rome: Vae Victis
    • 500k Club
    • Crusader Kings II: Way of Life
    • Crusader Kings II: Horse Lords
    • Crusader Kings II: Conclave
    • Hearts of Iron IV: Colonel
    • Crusader Kings II: Reapers Due
    • Hearts of Iron IV: Together for Victory
    • Crusader Kings II: Monks and Mystics
    • Hearts of Iron IV: Death or Dishonor
    • Hearts of Iron IV: Expansion Pass
    • Hearts of Iron IV: Expansion Pass
    • Rome Gold
    • Semper Fi
    • Hearts of Iron III Collection
    • Hearts of Iron III: Their Finest Hour
    • For the Motherland
    • Crusader Kings II: Sword of Islam
    • Crusader Kings II: Sunset Invasion
    • Crusader Kings II: Sons of Abraham
    • Crusader Kings II: The Republic
    • Crusader Kings II: Rajas of India
    • Crusader Kings II: The Old Gods
    • Crusader Kings II: Legacy of Rome
    • Crusader Kings II: Charlemagne
    Chapter 21 – November 1945

    AuthAAR’s Notes: So, as mentioned before my new HOI3 mod project is quite time-consuming, as I’m learning to mod the game from scratch and doing a major country and scenario rewrite, with dozens of new or modified countries, map changes, new/adapted events etc.

    With this and my three other AARs still going, it means this one is going to get even quicker and dirtier (I’m gradually honing it down to my original ideal of short and sharp ;) ). Quicker to write and read, I hope, making use of some spreadsheet stuff that is now pre-formatted and automatically collated to cut down on words and screenshots. Plus just omitting more details from combat descriptions, minor diplomatic events etc and making the summaries even more general. Especially as this war with Japan is taking longer than I’d anticipated to finish off.

    I hope all this meets with your approval, Dear Readers. I think the sweep and gist of things still comes across OK, but please let me know if you think it doesn’t.


    ******

    1. The Far East Front

    [Note: The first format change is to provide an up-front summary of the whole Front, then just add few commentary details and stats for each sector.]

    November saw supply problems across the front have a noticeable effect on Soviet combat operations. The Central Sector was particularly hard hit by shortages, with the air base of Irkutsk basically out of commission for the month, and those to the east of it on limited operations only. Poor supply also badly affected a number of ground battles. The two combined meant the Japanese were able to be far more aggressive in the Central Sector in particular, though the Soviets still made some gains.


    Operational Summary, Far East – November 1945.

    ******

    1.1 Eastern Sector

    For example, lack of supplies in Urusha, where one Soviet rifle division was defending an attack by four enemy division saw it in big trouble on the morning of 5 November. A day later, supply had been restored but the damage had been done. The battle was lost later on 6 November, with disproportionately high Soviet casualties (1137 v 385).

    On the morning of 7 November, the 1st Marine Division arrived by train in Ulya, where it linked up with the Red Banner Pacific Fleet and began to work up to full combat organisation.

    On 8 November, the new 2 DBAD (STRAT – Pe-8s) bomber wing was deployed to Tyndinskiy to begin working up. 1 DBAD (equipped with older versions of the Pe-8) was also transferred there from the west. The VVS was interested in conducting some test runs with their new toys. The range of 1 DBAD was less than the new 2 DBAD due to older fuel tanks (both wings were being upgraded to even newer components which had been developed while they were being built) and they had an older airframe model.


    1 DBAD was sent to do logistical bombing in the Obluchye region – the wing commander would select his own target province. With few Japanese aircraft active in the Theatre, the wing (at around 50% org after recent rebasing) was sent by itself. Which proved to be an unwise risk.


    Their bombing run on Bureya started at 1500hr on 9 November, but they were met by a wing of Japanese INT. Soviet fighters of 7th Air Wing (which it turned out had been just in range after all) were scrambled to assist and briefly engaged the Japanese as the raid was ending. But 1 DBAD had been badly cut up by the time they returned later that evening; their mission was hastily called off.

    Later that night, the Soviets (left on an air superiority mission in the area) had their revenge, intercepting 4 Zerosen at 2200hr over Bureya, taking a little damage but devastating the Japanese interceptors, with an air victory declared.

    As Soviet progress was made towards Nikolayevsk na Amure, a new southern objective of the air base of Tumnin was added to 6th Army’s list.


    By 29 November, 4 Zerosen had been repaired enough for the Japanese to send them out again – and they were once more jumped by 7th Air Wing this time over Zavitaya, for another devastating VVS air victory.

    As the month ended, the sector had seen some heavy fighting, including probably the largest single battle yet in the Far East, a Soviet victory attacking Obluchye, with combined casualties of over 5,000 men in the six-day battle. The next three largest battles were all won by the Japanese, in that part of the line nearer to the Central Sector (and thus with more supply problems).


    Battles listed in size by total casualties, with unfinished at the bottom, shaded grey.
    But the terrain won by month’s end was all in the Soviet column, with Skovordino lost on the 2nd but won back again by the 28th.

    ******

    1.2 Central Sector

    On 1 November, 52nd Corps was transferred from 7th to 1st Army after the latter’s recent more aggressive spirit and progress in the Central Sector, bring the 1st up to 100,000 men in strength, in three corps.

    By 3 November, supply problems were widespread. Virtually no air support was available in the sector and attacks that should have been reasonably viable were often aborted after a short skirmish, while defence often became very difficult.

    This persisted during the month: the defence of Shilka (three otherwise strong Soviet divisions defending an attack by one Japanese infantry division) was badly compromised on 17 November by a lack of supplies. That shorter battle was won, but an eight-day battle from 20-28 November was eventually lost, despite a casualty count well in the Soviets’ favour (658 v 1,319), from a lack of organisation following a continuation of poor supply.

    The Japanese were firmly on the offensive in this sector throughout the month, winning all the larger battles and gaining some ground in Ust’Karsk early and then Mogocha later in the month. This was offset by a range of smaller Soviet victories and gains further west, especially the objective province of Mildigun, captured on 5 November and held for the rest of the month.



    ******

    1.3 Southern Sector

    The Southern Sector only saw limited combat by Soviet forces, though the Mongolians (for whom there are no battle reports) were quite active, advancing in the south (which I think triggered one of those auto occupation of low infra provinces gains) and holding elsewhere. Not a single air mission was flown in the sector during the month, highlighting the supply problems for the VVS in Irkutsk.



    ******

    2. Finland

    The suppression of the Finnish revolt was in full swing during November. The Soviet Archangelsk Theatre had mounted its main response from the north and east. A few Finnish units were running around in the less well-guarded margins to the west and south, but there was no doubt they would be rounded up in due course.


    Casualties rates were running at 20-1 in the Soviets’ favour. Some air units (CAS) had been transferred to the Theatre Commander, but he seemed not to have used them yet. A steady sequence of provinces was liberated throughout November.


    Question: could this theatre be diverting supply effort from the Far East, hence causing some of the problems over there in recent weeks? If so – damn pesky rebels, but well done game. ;)

    ******

    3. Production and Logistics

    The new and powerful 11. Tank Division finished basic training and was deployed in the Lwow Theatre on 1 November. Its place in the queue was taken up by a lighter and smaller but faster armoured formation.


    At this stage, US Lend Lease was again at a high (around 100 IC), giving a total Soviet capacity of 432 IC, of which 237 IC was being spent on the production queue, which was running at 100%.

    A new nuclear reactor (the third such facility) was completed in Noginsk on 5 November. No new reactors were planned, but the released effort went into expanding the Mytishchi facility to a third level. All were near Moscow, where Stalin could keep a close eye on them.


    Some spare IC was invested in beginning a high-cost heavy mechanised division, though subsequent cutbacks to US Lend Lease would slow its production significantly in coming weeks. Still, it was an investment for a possible future war for Europe.


    Indeed, by 12 November Lend Lease had reduced to 67 IC, with the total Soviet economy down to 390 IC. Production of the new heavy mechanised division was slowed to around 12% of its massive 40.5 IC cost.

    As described in the Far East reports, supply across the front was poor by 12 November, especially around Irkutsk, except in the eastern part of the front, the advance in the middle of the Central Sector and in southern Mongolia. It was probably no coincidence that this was where the Soviets were having the most success on the battlefield.


    Another new INT wing was deployed in the west on 15 November. And by the 18th, the supply shortages in the Central Sector had worsened and were causing real problems the Japanese were taking advantage of.


    This prompted another series of infrastructure upgrades in the Far East and a couple of ‘weak links’ in the Trans-Siberian Railway back west near Magnitogorsk. All were put to the top of the queue (11 in all, at 0.29 IC each).


    A check on the VVS units in Irkutsk on 24 November confirmed they were still grounded for lack of supplies – though fuel was plentiful everywhere.

    ******

    4. Technology

    With the improving intelligence situation (see more below) with eight spies in reserve and growing, one LS of effort was transferred from spy training (down to 3) to research (up to 21/22) on 5 November, with medium tank reliability (L6) being resumed. This was repeated on 7 November, with special forces (L5) back on the drawing boards and 22/22 projects again under research.

    Just the two research projects were completed during the month, with supply organisation given another boost on 30 November due to current logistic problems in the east.



    ******

    5. Espionage

    A review of international mission priorities on 1 November saw the following decided:
    • Turkey – spy strength 1, 50% c-esp; 50% party support. Changed to 100% party support.
    • Spain – spy strength 6, 100% c-esp. No change.
    • Manchukuo – spy strength 2; 50% c-esp; 50% disrupt NU. Changed to 66.6% c-esp; 33.3% disrupt NU.
    • Japan – spy strength 2; 66.6% c-esp; 33.3% disrupt NU. No change.
    By 10 November Japanese spy strength had risen to 3; c-esp was taken to 100% of the mission effort. After some bloody exchanges, Japanese spy strength was down to 1 by 21 November, with the mission adjusted to 33.3% c-esp; 66.6% disrupt NU, in response to the more favourable conditions.

    The same day, with 11 Soviet spy teams now in reserve, the Manchurian mission was tweaked again to take it back to 50% c-esp; 50% disrupt NU.

    The following table details the number and identity of spies caught by the USSR within its borders or on their overseas missions (a total of 29, down four from October) and the progress of the four Soviet foreign missions.


    Of note, despite the whole effort in Turkey being directed to supporting the PCP there, all the ground made in October was lost (-3% support recorded), if the reports were to be believed, with no change detected in Spain. National unity in both Japan and Manchukuo was again reduced a little – an important part of the strategy to get them to the point of surrender as early as possible. Strategic weapons attacks were another key part to that strategy – especially the planned nuclear devices.

    ******

    6. Theatre Summaries

    As seen before, progress in the Far East was slower than had been hoped, principally due to the related factors of supply difficulties, little air support and ground combat. This in turn made the Japanese more aggressive in the Central Sector, where they attacked more often than the Soviets. Total casualty rates, especially from Soviet air attacks, were down significantly from the month before. The continued progress of the 6th Army on the Pacific Coast remained the one really substantial bright spot. for the Soviets.



    ******

    South East Asia had seen only minor changes this month. Malaya continued to be neglected by the Allies, while at first there was some surprise that the Japanese may have re-invaded the Philippines, where the Allied liberation army was still largely in place. There was no additional information available on the apparent Japanese advances in southern Sulawesi.


    Allied neglect in Malaya was plumbing new depths, with Kuala Lumpur lost again. A sole US Marine EF under British command was the only unit contesting the Japanese forces there. The Thais seemed to have departed and no other Allied units had been brought in to assist, with Singapore still enemy-occupied.


    The situation in the Philippines was explained, with (incongruously) pro-Japanese rebels appearing in northern Luzon. They should soon be dealt with by a nearby British division.



    ******

    In Australia, things had not quite been mopped up yet, with a Japanese mountain division loose in New South Wales and Japanese marines holed up in Adelaide.


    There was no change to the situation in the wider Pacific area.
     
    Last edited:
    • 2Like
    Reactions:
    Chapter 22 – December 1945 New
  • Bullfilter

    Old Boardgame Grognard
    29 Badges
    Aug 31, 2008
    6.536
    1.265
    • Crusader Kings II
    • Europa Universalis: Rome
    • Hearts of Iron III
    • Hearts of Iron IV: Cadet
    • Rome: Vae Victis
    • 500k Club
    • Crusader Kings II: Way of Life
    • Crusader Kings II: Horse Lords
    • Crusader Kings II: Conclave
    • Hearts of Iron IV: Colonel
    • Crusader Kings II: Reapers Due
    • Hearts of Iron IV: Together for Victory
    • Crusader Kings II: Monks and Mystics
    • Hearts of Iron IV: Death or Dishonor
    • Hearts of Iron IV: Expansion Pass
    • Hearts of Iron IV: Expansion Pass
    • Rome Gold
    • Semper Fi
    • Hearts of Iron III Collection
    • Hearts of Iron III: Their Finest Hour
    • For the Motherland
    • Crusader Kings II: Sword of Islam
    • Crusader Kings II: Sunset Invasion
    • Crusader Kings II: Sons of Abraham
    • Crusader Kings II: The Republic
    • Crusader Kings II: Rajas of India
    • Crusader Kings II: The Old Gods
    • Crusader Kings II: Legacy of Rome
    • Crusader Kings II: Charlemagne
    Chapter 22 – December 1945

    AuthAAR’s Note: I’ve may slowed down the ‘refresh rate’ on new episodes a bit while I work on my HOI3 mod, but have not abandoned the story! The next instalment follows: again, I’ve tweaked the presentation a little, trying to strike what I feel the right balance to be for detail and summary, table and graphical presentation.

    In part, I’ve re-inserted a little more detail on the map summaries, in part for presentation purposes, aided by the fact that with weather (December in the Far East) and supply factors, the pace of operations slowed down a fair bit. I’ll deal with the weather effects briefly in the chapter. But there are some significant research advances that move the story closer to some other ‘exciting’ (!!
    :eek:) possibilities too.


    ******

    1. The Far East Front - General

    As we get back into events, the Soviets are (slowly) closing in on the last enemy remnants trapped in the northern pocket.


    Weather will prove a major factor during the month, with relatively few battles and attacking made that much more difficult. Temperatures in the southern half of the theatre typically range from -6 to -10C. In the northern pocket, it is in the mid -20s.

    An example from a battle later in the month illustrates the rough effect of this on attacking power (with the ‘interesting’ prospect of an Indonesian general commanding a marine division in Manchurian colours! It also drastically reduces movement speeds as well, contributing to the slow progress.


    Otherwise, one battle has carried over: a Japanese attack on Mordaga, in the Eastern Sector.

    ******

    2. Eastern Sector


    The situation in the Eastern Sector in early December 1945, with the Soviets cautiously on the advance in increasingly difficult conditions.

    Most of the fighting occurred either in the first week or last couple of weeks of the month, with a lull in the middle as units advanced – or just hunkered down in the frigid conditions. The fight for Mordaga was lost by 2 December, and proved to be the first of three Soviet defeats in that province as the new Soviet defending units slipped in as the Japanese slowly advanced on the province (the weather of course also slowing most movement down to a crawl).

    Easily the largest battle in any sector for the month was fought for Ushuman from 2-7 December, with almost 3,000 men killed on both sides as the Soviet attackers won a hard-fought victory. The province had still not been occupied by the end of the month, after a new Japanese unit slipped in on 30 December. That battle was still in progress as the year ended.

    Japanese CAS made a rare appearance on 8 December, the day after the Imeni Poliny Osipenko was occupied by the Soviets. They were intercepted, but not until after they managed to kill a few Soviet defenders. They did not return for the rest of the month and no counter-attack on the province eventuated.


    Elsewhere, apart from the successive failed attempts to defend Mordaga, the Soviets won a battle in Obluchye from 17-21 December, but then lost to a Japanese counter-attack (24-26 December) shortly after they occupied it. But Soviet advances in the east of the sector without opposition resulted in three other provinces being occupied, including the port of Nikolayevsk na Amure. With casualties from air raids added in, the Soviets inflicted significantly more damage than they sustained, even though the Japanese did most of the attacking and won more battles than they lost.


    Eastern Sector Operations – December 1945.


    A summary of battles (above) and advances.

    ******

    2. Western Sector

    There were only four battles along the rest of the front stretching to Mongolia during the month, one of those a small skirmish for Selanga Burin. The rest were all victorious Soviet attacks, increasing in scale as the month progressed. But as 1945 ended, none of these had yet turned into a liberation of the provinces concerned, even those won comparatively early in the month.

    The largest – the attack on Mogocha – lasted five days, resulting in heavy enemy ground casualties and even more from the air, with 2,004 enemy killed there in five days of raids from 24-28 December.


    Western Sector Operations – December 1945.


    Battle summary.

    ******

    3. Finland Sector

    The month saw the latest Finnish insurgency successfully wrapped as 1945 drew to a close. Early in the month, Stalin was about to sign a death warrant for the commander of 46 SD when he received a shocking report stating that his full-strength division had been attacked in Lahti by a brigade of leaderless Finnish partisans and had run away with barely a fight!


    But this order was rescinded shortly afterwards, when it became clear MAJGEN Lazarev was simply moving on west to secure Lammi while more Soviet troops moved in behind him into Lahti. 64 SD took almost a day to defeat the Finns’ reckless assault, but Soviet honour was retrieved – and Lazarev’s life spared.


    No other serious ground actions were fought for the rest of the campaign, which consisted of Finnish partisan brigades and HQs running without a fight as the Soviets progressively regained all occupied territory towards the end of the month, with occasional Soviet air support chiming in.


    Finnish Operations – December 1945.


    A summary of battles (above) and advances.

    ******

    4. Production and Logistics

    The ‘mixed’ 24 Tank Div was deployed in the West on 2 December, with a new NAV wing based in Riga.


    Another ‘mixed’ tank division was deployed in the West on 3 December. A new ‘heavy guards’ division began training the same day.


    On 8 December the forward air base at Tyndinskiy (supporting the Eastern Sector) had Level 4 facilities installed and the Level 5 expansion begun.

    The supply drain increased as the month went on, so that projects at the bottom of the queue had to be put on hold as the supply stockpile began to drain quickly. It had been stabilised by the end of the month.



    ******

    5. Research

    A long-awaited milestone was reached on 15 December, with strategic rocket research completed and attention now directed at turning theory into practice. It was expected work on the first operational flying bombs could begin in May 1946.


    Five breakthroughs came over a few days later in December, over just a three-day period. Significant among these was civil nuclear research progressing to the point that an actual nuclear bomb could be developed: the necessary research was commenced without delay. RADAR-guided missiles would improve Soviet hard and soft attack capability; submarine development continued to improve, as did training for the new STRAT bomber arm.



    ******

    6. Espionage

    The loss of a spy in Turkey on 10 December caused a change from 100% Communist Party support to a 50/50 split between that and counter-espionage. Another spy was lost there on 13 December and three would fall during the month.

    Similarly, on 19 December a spy was lost in Japan, so that mission was changed form 1/3 counter-espionage and 2/3 NU disruption to a 50/50 split.

    By the end of the month, a whopping 40 enemy spies ha been neutralised in the USSR or in the four foreign missions. Five Soviet agents had been lost but nine trained, so overall strength rose to 67 agents in the field or in reserve.

    In terms of political results, NU in Japan and Manchuria had been eroded again, but there was no change in Communist Party support in either Spain or Turkey.


    The Foreign Ministry believed the attitude of the two respective heads of state may be making headway even harder than it would normally have been: both were described (somewhat pejoratively) as ‘pig-headed isolationists’. They may have described themselves more as ‘independently-minded nationalists’, but these judgements are always subjective.



    ******

    7. Theatre Summaries

    As noted above, fighting was subdued and advances limited in the Far East during the fierce winter, though the Northern Pocket had almost been eliminated. Total casualty rates, especially from Soviet air attacks, were down even further from the month before, though heavily in the Soviet’s favour.



    ******

    In Australia, the Allies were close to wrapping up the Japanese invasion there, where the enemy had just been ejected from Adelaide.


    South East Asia appeared to show no changes in occupation at all. Malaya was quiet – the Allies seemingly still asleep at the wheel there, with Singapore and Kuala Lumpur still controlled by Japan.


    However, it looked like the French had sent in a British Marine Division to take Guangzhou from the Japanese in Southern China. They were now advancing on Hong Kong – and had 12 Allied air wings in support from Guangzhou’s air field.


    The Americans had lost Johnston Island in the Pacific, but otherwise nothing of significance had changed there either.

    Given the amount of interest in Japanese naval strength after all these years of war [and given the overwhelming Soviet spy presence in Japan and presumed Allied reporting, I thought it fair enough for a brief tag to get general info], a Special Intelligence Estimate indicated Japan still had a good number of capital ships – especially aircraft carriers – operating under the Imperial Navy’s ensign.

     
    • 1Like
    Reactions: