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    Real Strategy Requires Cunning

El Pip

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I do like the new reduced 'operational' overviews and the reassurance that you are human and are struggling to churn out so many AARs simultaneously ;)

"Detection", surface or aerial, does boost night attack (not listed in the tooltips or in the game, because this is a Paradox game made to their usual high standards) and also gives increased visibility on adjacent territories you fly over/sail past.

For a naval bomber (or indeed surface unit) to actually attack something it has to be detected, which uses the relevant value from doctrine/radar/whatever. Entirely separately there is 'knowing something is there', your radar station (or whatever) detecting there is an enemy in that sea zone. This is why you can see, say a submarine, in a sea zone but have your bombers refuse to actually attack it.

If you plan on hunting subs from the air then it's a good idea, if you just want some NAVs to support a battle that has already started then it's no use at all.
 
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Bullfilter

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The next chapter is ready to go, so first the traditional comment feebback:
Getting closer to shutting down the pocket in the north is good, but except that this has been a less than ideal month on the field. At least the frontier against nuclear forces of nature is steadily progressing. Again about tech, I'm looking forward to having jet engines so aircraft model names aren't ahistorical as hell.

Australia moved its capital somehow through enemy lines and popped up behind them :D I hope this doesn't hinder the supply situation in the developed south coast with majority of units located there and cause losing it entirely.

A very good episode overall, thank you for keeping us entertained especially in these times!


I always research this but have no idea if it's really helpful or not
That northern pocket is proving tough to close - the Japanese keep refusing to give up! How dare they! :p
Pretty much seconding @diskoerekto on this, with the added caveat that I'm not entirely familiar with how it works in HOI3 specifically. From the description it sounds like it should improve "accuracy" against ground units, which will hopefully manifest in the form of more casualties per strike.

----

Japan appears to be waking up from its long winter's nap. It doesn't look like the front is in danger of an overall collapse, thankfully, but these apparent reverses especially in the south are certainly cause for concern. It appears the Japanese might be trying to anchor their flank on Lake Baikal, which would explain the ferocity in that sector.
Yes, Japan's resolve has shown no sign of collapsing yet. It's going to be a hard fight - especially with AI generals and with a large army and air force trying to function at the end of a very long supply line.
More mixed news, but it seems like with the turn in the weather the whole Russian front is in fierce conflict (if not necessarily in motion).

I am remain riveted by what is going on in Australia.
Still no scything offensives for us in the East yet, alas. An Australia continues to be a nice little mini-campaign. More unexpected developments in June to be briefly reported, too! :)
It's not over yet. Of course, the Japanese are concentrating their forces far from where they are most needed, so you'll probably be able to close the pocket without too much trouble. That said, Mongolia isn't looking too good right now. I'm sure the tide will turn again, and even more in your favour, especially once that pocket is contained and cleared up and you get troops rolling down the Chinese Coast, forcing the Japs to frantically redeploy troops to protect their lifeline. The further West the Japanese forces are when you take Korea, the worse for them...

The Allies remain busy in a game of whack-a-mole to evict the Japs from their colonies (and former colonies). That buys the Soviet Union time to take more territory from the Japanese, and maybe even for the Red Army to get to the Japanese mainland first, be it with troops, or with nukes. There will be no need for a Korea war and a demarcation zone...

From what I understand, Navigation radar mostly increases the impact of your bombers at night. The medium variant is much more effective than the small version, or the large version. Out of all the aerial units, Naval bombers get the most bonuses from Nav Radar, giving them a higher chance to detect a fleet. (depending also on the visibility of the fleet ofc.)
That pocket is a tough proposition - we'll soon see how well the Soviet attempts go to close in in June.

The Allies once again need to whack the mole in June - in part the price for not closing things out properly when they have the chance. And yes, siezing Japan and puppeting it to the Comintern cause (even if a bit radioactive) is definitely a priority. Something to keep the Allies entertained in the east if we need to try the Steamroller on them in Europe <evil Stalin cackle>.
The attack in South China will draw a lot of divisions away from the Soviets.
Though only if they were able to maintain the lodgement - which seems to have been far to weak to resist the local garrison in the end. :(
I do like the new reduced 'operational' overviews and the reassurance that you are human and are struggling to churn out so many AARs simultaneously ;)

"Detection", surface or aerial, does boost night attack (not listed in the tooltips or in the game, because this is a Paradox game made to their usual high standards) and also gives increased visibility on adjacent territories you fly over/sail past.

For a naval bomber (or indeed surface unit) to actually attack something it has to be detected, which uses the relevant value from doctrine/radar/whatever. Entirely separately there is 'knowing something is there', your radar station (or whatever) detecting there is an enemy in that sea zone. This is why you can see, say a submarine, in a sea zone but have your bombers refuse to actually attack it.

If you plan on hunting subs from the air then it's a good idea, if you just want some NAVs to support a battle that has already started then it's no use at all.
Glad you like the abbreviated format. And yes, only too human :(;).

Thanks for the info on detection - it does look worth pursuing then. For bombers too. NAVs in particular, as they may often be all I can send against substantive Japanese or (possibly) Allied fleets in the future.

******
OK, on now to publishing the next chapter - out soon!
 
Chapter 16 – June 1945

Bullfilter

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Chapter 16 – June 1945

AuthAAR’s Notes: This will be as short and sharp as I can make it. Supply hampered the AI’s operational tempo in some sectors.

******

Introduction

As June began, the Soviets were engaged in two battles carried over from May. To the north, the Japanese were attacking Tomtor [-52% progress] and in the centre the defence of Mogoca [-19%] continued. There was a flurry of attacks, mainly by the Soviets, as the clock ticked past midnight to start the month, but most of these ended up being short probes that were over almost as soon as they began.

******

1. Northern Sector


Operational summary, Far East – Northern Sector, June 1945.

With the fight in Tomtor continuing, a short Soviet probe on the Japanese port of Ulya (6th Army’s ultimate offensive target) was over very quickly with only 14 casualties on both sides. On 4 June, a second Japanese division joined in the attack 57 Motor Rifle Div but did not immediately reinforce. But the Soviets were able to win a seven-day battle on 6 June before the second Japanese division reinforced (Soviet 899 v 1124 Japanese killed). It would prove to be the only recorded Soviet victory in the Northern sector that month.

The first new major attack in the North was launched by the Japanese on Ust’ Maja on 10 June, as soon as the Soviets had occupied it following a victory there in May. Despite air support hitting Enken and causing far higher casualties on the attackers than the Soviets suffered in defence, the Japanese merged victorious after six days of heavy fighting (Soviet 1,119 v 2098 Japanese killed).

As that fight went on, the Soviets attacked Ulya more seriously on 11 June. That engagement went until 19 June, when the Soviet assault ran out of steam and was called off, for the loss of 1,207 Soviets troops for 1,221 of the enemy on the ground and a moderate number to air strikes.

A first attack from Tommot on Nelkan went from 12-14 June and produced another Soviet defeat (Soviet 353 v 310 Japanese killed).

A small Soviet probe on Ust’ Maja after the Japanese had occupied it on 23 June was soon called off – another defeat, although it would ultimately be reoccupied on 30 June when the Japanese did not oppose another Soviet sortie. Of note, a second Soviet air group of two wings was operating out of Jakutsk on 23 June, as the forward troops began to get further away from the main northern air base in Olonek.

Aidanskoe Nagor's was taken by the Soviets on 25 June, after an earlier advance there was not opposed by the Japanese. But the enemy did attack in force as soon as the Soviets pulled in, defeating the defenders in a two-day battle which saw 1,193 Soviet and 729 Japanese troops killed. The Soviets were still retreating and the Japanese had still not reoccupied it as the month ended.

Also on 25 June, a new Japanese attack began on Tomtor, by the fresh division seen earlier, also on a fresh Soviet division that had arrived in the meantime. There was no battle report, but the Soviets were defeated on 29 June, with an estimated 800-900 casualties but unknown Japanese losses. The latter were still advancing on Tomtor as the month ended – and movement in the north was usually slow over long distances.

Two more short Soviet probes on Nelkan from Tomtor on 26 and 30 June also failed and were quickly called off. This made a run of nine Soviet losses in the sector following the initial win in Tomtor, though Ust’ Maja was reoccupied unopposed as the month ended, as mentioned above.

The largest air casualties from Soviet air strikes over the month (totals) were in Ust' Maja (1,368), Aidanskoe Nagor's (1,237) and Lazo (793). The raids in Enken and Ulya killed fewer than 340 enemy each.

******

2. Central Sector


Operational summary, Far East – Central Sector, June 1945.

The Central sector (with both 6th and 15th Armies participating) was the most active in June. The battle in Mogoca, which had begun on 24 May, did not end until 3 June. It had looked like the Soviets would win, with friendly air support and a brief (but unsuccessful) spoiling attack launched on Petropavlovsk Kamchatskiy on 1 June and another on 2-3 June, which also failed. But the gallant defenders were forced to retreat after the Japanese managed to reinforce the fight with fresh troops. The enemy’s win came at a high cost, losing 2,604 men taking the province, while the Soviets lost 1,350.

Two Soviet attacks kicked off shortly after midnight on 1 June. One on the Japanese airfield of Tyndinskiy was called off straight away, but another on Ust’ Urkima from Ust’ Nyukzha was more serious. But unsuccessful, abandoned the next day after 706 Soviet soldiers had been killed, with the Japanese taking 247 casualties.

The Japanese tried to return the favour on Ust’ Nyukzha from Tyndinskiy on 4 June, but were defeated (Soviet 71 v 198 Japanese killed). The Soviets decided to reply straight away, with a large and determined attack put in on Tyndinskiy from Nerjungri which ended up stretching from 4 to 11 June. The Soviets won but suffered heavy casualties doing so (Soviet 2,104 v 1,414 Japanese killed).

The next major battle was a return Soviet attack on Ust’ Urkima, which started on 6 June, lasted five days and ended in another Soviet victory (Soviet 902 v Japanese 865 killed).

The Japanese marched back in to Mogoca on 9 June and were themselves attacked straight away. They proved too worn out to keep the hard-won province. They lost 313 men against 109 Soviet attackers killed before they retreated to where they had started. The Soviets were back in Mogoca again by 13 June.

The Soviets took Tyndinskiy on 14 June and, in a familiar pattern, were then attacked by fresh Japanese troops from Bomnaksk on arrival, retreating the next day even though they had killed more attackers than they had lost themselves (Soviet 160 v 240 Japanese). The enemy had re-secured the airfield by 16 June.

Soviet advance elements took Ust’ Urkima on 16 June but were – of course – subjected to a fierce counter-attack straight away, this time from Berezitovyy. Despite tactical superiority and air support, the Soviet troops had not had time to dig in or reinforce and were defeated by 20 June (Soviet 627 v 1,124 Japanese killed). By the month’s end, the Soviets had retreated back north, but the Japanese had not yet occupied the province – and another Soviet infantry division was on its way in a race for it.

Yet another Soviet probe on Petropavlovsk Kamchatskiy failed on 28 June, though again few troops were lost. But despite a couple of earlier failed probes on Erofej Pavlovic, heavy air raids between 14-17 June had killed many Japanese defenders and they ran without fighting as the Soviets advanced on the province a third time, which they secured on 27 June.

The month finished with a new attack mounted by the Soviets from Mogoca, south against the similarly-named Mogocha, fought from 28-30 June and ending in a Soviet victory (Soviet 110 v 280 Japanese killed). The victorious Soviet tank division was still advancing on Mogocha at the end of the month and it was far from certain whether it would occupy it before Japanese reinforcements arrived. And if it did, it would be quite badly exposed.

The Central sector bore the brunt of Soviet air power in June: in raids between 1-11 and 20-21 June, a huge 6,642 Japanese troops were killed in Tyndinskiy alone. Other major targets were Erofej Pavlovic (2,384), Mogocha (1,990), Ust’ Urkima (1,955) and Petropavlovsk Kamchatskiy (1,907).

******

3. Southern Sector


Operational summary, Far East – Southern Sector, June 1945.

The Southern sector was very quiet in June. Apart from a brief Soviet probe on Bukacaca at midnight on 1 June, where only a dozen troops were killed on either side, there were no attacks by anyone for the rest of the month. There were three Soviet air raids on the Bukacaca the day it was attacked, killing 511 enemy troops, and that was the only air action in the sector.

On the Soviet side, anyway, it seemed to be a lack of supplies rather than fighting spirit that proved the determining factor. More will be reported on this wider problem in a separate logistics section below.

******

4. Mongolian Sector


Operational summary, Far East – Mongolian Sector, June 1945.

The month began with the occupation of Taryacin by the Japanese on 1 June - but the division which had occupied it was retreating by 1600hr that afternoon, while a fresh enemy division was on its way from Tsetserlig.

By 18 June, Soviet and Mongolian troops were advancing to try to retake Taryacin: the Japanese unit there had vacated it and the new troops had not yet arrived, so no battle ensued straight away. In fact, neither side had arrived there before the end of the month.

But a new attack started on Dzhirgalanta on 30 June by Soviet and Mongolian troops in Ider and Muren.

No Soviet air missions were conducted in the sector during the month. And no Japanese air operations had been conducted on the entire front in June.

******

5. Logistics

Reports of supply shortages were building as the month wore on. By 18 June it had become serious enough for more analysis to be done. It showed the situation was particularly bad in and around Lake Baikal – in other words, the Southern sector.


The effect were obvious four days later in Irkutsk and Ulan Ude.


Two days later Barguzin and Burjatija, to the north of the enemy salient on Lake Baikal, were also out of supply. Goryachinsk had never been reoccupied after the victory the previous month: Japanese marines were now dug in there.

Supply production and overall stockpiling (usually sitting between 55-60,000 units) was not the problem. It was clearly a distribution/throughput issue. The response on 25 June, after a large pool of construction capacity was freed by the completion of the USSR’s second nuclear reactor (see Production below) was a massive infrastructure building plan. It would cover upgrades in 61 provinces stretching from Kazan in the west through Irkutsk, to the new airfields to its north, and out to the current front line.


Infrastructure map of the Trans-Siberian Railway and branch lines, indicating the expansion works of June 1945.

Construction was expected to be completed in October and take almost 20 IC. With the way the fight on the Far Eastern front was progressing, likely to still be of use by then. Supply distribution processes would be looked at in the next research review.

In the interim, supply remained a problem in significant parts of the theatre on 27 June, though divisions in the main breakthrough area (6th and 15th Armies) remained largely adequate.


The supply review also explained why new marine and naval units could no longer be deployed directly in the Pacific fleet base at Petropavlovsk Kamcackij. The Japanese seizure of Susuman in May had broken the last land supply route to Kamchatka. The infrastructure was insufficient in the far northern province of Cokurdah to allow supply to be traced through it. Infrastructure work there was contemplated, but the Soviets believed they would have re-opened communications before October.


It meant Petropavlovsk Kamcackij was now supplied by maritime convoy.



******

6. Naval Operations

By 7 June, two new transport flotillas had been produced and, as mentioned above, had to be deployed in Sevastopol instead of directly Petropavlovsk Kamcackij. As something of a maritime experiment, the old heavy cruiser Maxim Gorkiy would attempt to escort them all the way to the Far East, starting out at 0300hr.

By the early hours of 19 June, they had managed to make it past Japanese-occupied Manila without being attacked. But their luck ran out at 0200hr when two wings of Japanese NAV struck them off Mayaira Point: by the time they had slipped north into Bashi Channel, they had taken some damage.


The same bombers found them again in the Lu Tao Lan Hsu Passage at 1400hr that afternoon. By 0600hr on 20 June they were in the Amakusa Sea off Formosa, with the Maxim Gorkiy having taken 30% damage and lost all organisation, while 12. Transport Flotilla was down to 40% strength.

They had a nerve-wracking transit past the Japanese Home Islands but were never attacked by the Japanese Navy and no more NAV intercepted them. They limped in to port at midnight on 23 June, damaged but still afloat.


In other naval news, the new convoy route keeping Petropavlovsk Kamcackij supplied was hit on 25 June, with one transport sunk. There were still plenty of convoys and escorts in reserve.



******

7. Diplomacy

It was also a quiet month diplomatically, with little Tibet self-aligning towards the Comintern from 7 to 29 June.



******

8. Research

Fighter ground crew training was improved on 2 June and, because it was still well below par, was continued.


Special forces training achieved Level 3 and it too was persisted with given all the affected units types were important to future Soviet offensive plans.



******

9. Production

Production saw more activity than most other areas of the Soviet war effort in June. Three new artillery brigades (conventional and rocket) were deployed to Far Eastern division on 1 June. Another new wing of heavy bombers was put under construction.


The next day another medium artillery brigade (152mm guns) was deployed to 7th Army and the air base at Mutina expanded and another addition ordered. To develop practical experience and rebuild the rudimentary sub warfare capability, another flotilla of the old Series II boats was queued.


A new ‘standard template’ heavy armoured division was deployed into 7th Army on 4 June (the supply situation wasn't as obvious at that point). An expensive new five-brigade medium tank division was queued for service on the Western front in Europe.


On 8 June, two more marine brigades were deployed in Irkutsk and a new landing craft and transport flotilla to Sevastopol (all still prevented from deploying directly to the fleet base). The ships would delay a risky transit to the Far East for now. A new fast-moving light ‘combined-arms’ division was queued, again intended for European service.


9 June saw a fourth brigade added to the 1st Marine Div, another landing craft flotilla delivered in Sevastopol and the Irkutsk air base raised to the maximum level of expansion. A new wing of Yak-15 INT was put into production: more equipment to start boosting the European front.


With it seemingly secure and likely to become increasingly important, on 10 June work was begun on the expansion of the recently retaken air base at Jakutsk to Level 2. More rocket artillery was delivered to a 7th Army division on 14 June.

The next major production development came on 25 June with the commissioning of the USSR’s second nuclear reactor in Khimki. It would be left at Level 1 – for the time being, anyway – while work to increase the first reactor to Level 2 continued. Improved efficiency from practical experience had halved the construction cost from when the program had begun. It would be early July before nuclear physics had reached the necessary level to begin research into how to actually build a nuclear weapon. As we saw earlier, a large slice of the IC released was used to start the massive upgrade to the eastern infrastructure network.


There was also some IC left over for some more equipment builds, with another light ‘combined arms’ division and a flotilla of Kiev-class destroyers (the only Soviet ship class anywhere close to contemporary standards) commenced.



******

10. Intelligence

The Japanese Kempeitai started the month with two teams, producing three and losing two to Soviet action to finish with three (one still in reserve), with no Soviet agents lost. Japanese national unity had decreased from 66.0% to 65.8% but not through clandestine Soviet action, which remained entirely on counter-espionage.

Manchukuo started the month with one agent team at home, producing three and losing one to finish with three (two of them still in reserve), with no Soviet spies neutralised. The Soviet priority remained fully on counter-espionage there too. Manchurian national unity was steady on 67.9%.

Overall, the Soviets had lost no teams in the month and added six, therefore finishing with 19 in reserve. A new mission may well be declared in July.

The same large amount of enemy agents (37) was neutralised in June as in May. The UK once again lost the most with four agents taken, three from Germany and two each from France, Japan and the US, the rest from the usual assortment of Allied powers, with the Manchurian agent a couple of neutral ones thrown in.

******

11. Theatre Summaries

The Far Eastern Theatre saw some Soviet gains in the North and Centre, despite limited battlefield victories and supply problems in the south.


Total confirmed Soviet losses in land combat were a few thousand lower than in May at 11,394 with none lost to Japanese air raids.

With the operational tempo somewhat decreased, the Japanese and their puppets lost 12,996 men (almost 4,000 fewer than in May) in ground combat and 20,515 to air strikes (about 4,800 fewer than May). Total Japanese/Axis casualties were therefore 33,511, almost 9,000 fewer than in May.

******

The main points of interest in South East Asia was some modest gains in Sumatra, a few more Japanese inroads in Malaya but Singapore holding and a French lodgement in the Philippines.


The Japanese gains in Malaya had been made by 13 June. After that, they had been static as Allied forces returned en masse to (presumably) actually finish the job this time.


The French had been observed to have landed in Manila by 28 June with a mountain division. Aircraft were now based there but it was not known whether this would become a more general invasion and liberation of the Philippines or was just an isolated lodgement.



******

In Australia, the northern part of the front had remained static throughout June, but Allied (mainly Australian) forces had counter-attacked in Victoria and seemed to have cut off a Japanese mountain division that might hopefully be destroyed.

 
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Wraith11B

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Since the French have now liberated the rest of Indochina from the Japanese, are you considering going through and doing a quick save game edit so that they get all of those provinces?

Any ideas on why the Japanese failed to sortie a fleet to intercept your transports? I can't recall offhand if the IJN is completely sunk at this point.
 

nuclearslurpee

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The Soviets took Tyndinskiy on 14 June and, in a familiar pattern, were then attacked by fresh Japanese troops from Bomnaksk on arrival, retreating the next day even though they had killed more attackers than they had lost themselves (Soviet 160 v 240 Japanese).
This is exemplifying a very constant problem that will only get worse along the front. The way I see it, we have two solutions: rapid doctrine improvements to improve the organization of our forces during and after an offensive battle, which seems impractical in the necessary timeframe; or a shift in strategy towards only mounting offensives in a single sector of the front instead of broadly across the entire front. Leaving two fronts in defensive positions will reduce the amount of disorganization our troops suffer and allow us to build up reserves for following strikes.

Supply production and overall stockpiling (usually sitting between 55-60,000 units) was not the problem. It was clearly a distribution/throughput issue. The response on 25 June, after a large pool of construction capacity was freed by the completion of the USSR’s second nuclear reactor (see Production below) was a massive infrastructure building plan. It would cover upgrades in 61 provinces stretching from Kazan in the west through Irkutsk, to the new airfields to its north, and out to the current front line.


Infrastructure map of the Trans-Siberian Railway and branch lines, indicating the expansion works of June 1945.
Construction was expected to be completed in October and take almost 20 IC. With the way the fight on the Far Eastern front was progressing, likely to still be of use by then. Supply distribution processes would be looked at in the next research review.
I agree that this is the right approach. The HoI3 supply system operates by trying to supply the farthest-away troops first, so the fact that our troops at the extreme ends of the front are in supply while those nearer to the Trans-Siberian Railway are starving down indicates that the issue is not enough throughout is available in the Siberian interior. I will, however, say that the extensions in the north-east are of secondary importance, at most, and should be readily delayed if more urgent production projects are needed in other areas.

They had a nerve-wracking transit past the Japanese Home Islands but were never attacked by the Japanese Navy and no more NAV intercepted them. They limped in to port at midnight on 23 June, damaged but still afloat.
The importance of this is that while they may have some limited land-based naval air capacities, the IJN is by and large toothless now, unable to stop even small forces from traversing quite near to their own home waters. We should have a free hand in an eventual invasion of the Home Islands.
 
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El Pip

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Nice to see the Royal Australian Marines doing the business and starting to get the Japanese out of the country, the lack of that unit always seemed a bit of an oversight.

a flotilla of Kiev-class destroyers (the only Soviet ship class anywhere close to contemporary standards) commenced.
Those poor, poor sailors. The Kiev design was so bad that even the Soviet Admiralty (who approved a lot of crap designs for political reasons) thought them dangerous and used them as target hulks. Here the fleet will not be so lucky. :(

The importance of this is that while they may have some limited land-based naval air capacities, the IJN is by and large toothless now, unable to stop even small forces from traversing quite near to their own home waters. We should have a free hand in an eventual invasion of the Home Islands.
In fairness we were up against a Paradox AI so we always had a free hand on naval matters. ;)

Last I played Japan forgot to garrison the Home Islands, which I remember being a fairly common occurence. Probably worth checking if there even is anyone to resist an invasion.
 
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I guess the Japanese are fighting harder now that they can't retreat further east. Stuck between the Red Army and the Pacific, not a fun place to be. The Pacific is only just out of reach, I'm sure the Soviet troops on the ground can smell that sea air when the East Wind blows. The last mile is always the longest.

Things have bogged down elsewhere, but with Air Superiority, and more than likely additional reserves, I'm sure the Red Army will prevail eventually, even if it costs a couple thousand lives.

The Supply problems are a bit worrying, but they are also a product of your success. Throughput is definitely the problem. The further you send supplies, the more you use up along the way, so the more you need to send out at the start. Especially on the first half of the Trans-Siberian railway, up to Irkutsk, you need more capacity. I've already been slowly upgrading the Trans-Siberian in my game since the first of the Infra projects in 'Odin'. Starting from the high Infrastructure area around Moscow just in case. Of course, once you get access to larger Pacific ports, you can supplement the railways with ship-borne supplies, which will significantly alleviate the problem. On that note, I've always found it a bit weird that you can deploy your ships anywhere you can supply overland, and decide where they are deployed once completed. If you were building transports for use off the Siberian Pacific coast, then you would be making them over there, so a supply cutoff would not make the hulls magically move to Sevastopol... I actually decide where I'm building a ship when I start it's production, and then, when it gets delivered, unless I don't have the port anymore, I initially deploy the ship there, even if I may need it far away. Is there actually a mod that ties naval construction to a location/series of locations?

The Allies seem to finally be getting their act together, well, mostly the Australian Royal Marines. The French in the Philippines clearly have no real plan. They're lucky the IJA hasn't booted their single Division out of Manila already. Then again. Why is there no Japanese Garrison in Manila to begin with? This doesn't bode well for the Japanese Garrisoning their home Islands. As @El Pip already reminded us of this rather too common occurrence where Japan doesn't leave any troops behind in Japan proper.
 
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Those poor, poor sailors. The Kiev design was so bad that even the Soviet Admiralty (who approved a lot of crap designs for political reasons) thought them dangerous and used them as target hulks. Here the fleet will not be so lucky.
In fairness to the Kiev-class design, they also had going against them that they'd been started right before Barbarossa and construction was naturally a bit sidelined during the whole big war thing going on, so by the time anyone got around to finishing them they were quite out-of-date.

Of course that doesn't absolve the whole stability issue, but let's not claim that the stability of the ships was uniquely bad. It's not a Soviet submarine after all. :p
 
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The logistical headaches of fighting a major land war at the end of the Siberan railway ... is an as-yet unresolved equation (although we note the newly proposed proofs and wish them every success).
 
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Specialist290

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On that note, I've always found it a bit weird that you can deploy your ships anywhere you can supply overland, and decide where they are deployed once completed. If you were building transports for use off the Siberian Pacific coast, then you would be making them over there, so a supply cutoff would not make the hulls magically move to Sevastopol... I actually decide where I'm building a ship when I start it's production, and then, when it gets delivered, unless I don't have the port anymore, I initially deploy the ship there, even if I may need it far away. Is there actually a mod that ties naval construction to a location/series of locations?
This is honestly one of the things that has always bothered me about the HOI series as a whole. In every other Paradox game, construction of ships (and of units in general, for that matter, but it's especially noticeable for naval assets) is always tied to a particular province. I can see some logic to using the magical "deploy anywhere" system for land and air units, since in those cases you can abstract it away as the men being trained and equipment being assembled in facilities spread across the country and then "pooled" wherever the military needs it, but a ship essentially has to be assembled in place -- even if you can prefabricate the different components elsewhere, the hull is going to be sitting in place for a long time before it's in any fit state to move.
 
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I was thinking in the beginning, wow the Japs are giving it all they got to avoid encirclement, and it is definitely a factor, but it seems like mostly the reason was logistics. Army marching on its belly and all that. Good thinking with the infrastructure upgrade, we still have a lot of fighting to do here, potentially all the way to the other side of China. I think we should also check the infra level of newly acquired provinces in the southern sector, because after Irkutsk the Transsiberian Railway turns a bit north to follow the pre-war borders. On the other hand, we'll keep on fighting towards inland China. So after securing provinces, checking the level of infra and building it up to Transsiberian levels would be a good investment.

Capital city moving in Australia didn't cause the supply problem I was worried about, that's good news.

I like the fast exploitation division, they'll be very useful in the Western Theater when the time comes. But I'd put a Mechanized bde instead of a Mot, AC instead of an Engineer, and take out the Mot AA. It has 5% less CA bonus, but by 1945 it should have 10 kph division speed if Light Armour Engine tech is not very far behind current.

All is going well despite recent setbacks, I'm expecting the war machine to get up to speed very soon!
 
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This is honestly one of the things that has always bothered me about the HOI series as a whole. In every other Paradox game, construction of ships (and of units in general, for that matter, but it's especially noticeable for naval assets) is always tied to a particular province. I can see some logic to using the magical "deploy anywhere" system for land and air units, since in those cases you can abstract it away as the men being trained and equipment being assembled in facilities spread across the country and then "pooled" wherever the military needs it, but a ship essentially has to be assembled in place -- even if you can prefabricate the different components elsewhere, the hull is going to be sitting in place for a long time before it's in any fit state to move.
Suitably enough, given this AAR, the exception is perhaps the Soviet Pacific Fleet. Most of the ships, and all of the submarines, were built in European Russian shipyards, cut up and then put onto trains and shipped out along the Trans-Siberian railways for re-assembly. This leads to some odd ship histories were a submarine had it's hull sections pre-fabricated down in the Volga, was "laid down" in a shipyard in Leningrad and then "launched" in Vladivostok. Any of those locations could plausibly claim to be the home province for that submarine. For bonus hilarity the Soviets then spent the entire war trying to get most of their Pacific fleet back into the Baltic and other European waters.

Now I am not for one second suggesting Paradox had this in mind when making the system, or that this unusual exception in anyway justifies their general approach, but it could justify a relaxed approach to deployment locations being taken in this AAR. ;)
 
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Suitably enough, given this AAR, the exception is perhaps the Soviet Pacific Fleet. Most of the ships, and all of the submarines, were built in European Russian shipyards, cut up and then put onto trains and shipped out along the Trans-Siberian railways for re-assembly. This leads to some odd ship histories were a submarine had it's hull sections pre-fabricated down in the Volga, was "laid down" in a shipyard in Leningrad and then "launched" in Vladivostok. Any of those locations could plausibly claim to be the home province for that submarine. For bonus hilarity the Soviets then spent the entire war trying to get most of their Pacific fleet back into the Baltic and other European waters.

Now I am not for one second suggesting Paradox had this in mind when making the system, or that this unusual exception in anyway justifies their general approach, but it could justify a relaxed approach to deployment locations being taken in this AAR. ;)
OK, that I genuinely did not know... And that's hilarious.

Combining that with what I already knew about pre-Soviet Russia's infamous naval exploits, I'm beginning to see that "Our fleet is in the wrong ocean!" has been something of a running theme for them for quite a while.
 
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My 'Eye of SAA(u)Ron' now turns once more the the trackless east. A review of the responses to the last chapter before I head back to the Slog in the East.
Since the French have now liberated the rest of Indochina from the Japanese, are you considering going through and doing a quick save game edit so that they get all of those provinces?

Any ideas on why the Japanese failed to sortie a fleet to intercept your transports? I can't recall offhand if the IJN is completely sunk at this point.
No, I'll just let the game do what it will with minimum interference (Quick and Dirty, after all ;) ).

As far as I can tell (haven't done a detailed review), but they've probably lost all their major big-gun ships by now, but I have not detected any carriers having been sunk for the duration of the war. They are definitely still out there, as CVs hit and roasted my subs off Tokyo a few months back. Not sure why they didn't use them to hit the little sub-fleet as it limped to PK: maybe it was too quick or beneath their notice. :confused:
This is exemplifying a very constant problem that will only get worse along the front. The way I see it, we have two solutions: rapid doctrine improvements to improve the organization of our forces during and after an offensive battle, which seems impractical in the necessary timeframe; or a shift in strategy towards only mounting offensives in a single sector of the front instead of broadly across the entire front. Leaving two fronts in defensive positions will reduce the amount of disorganization our troops suffer and allow us to build up reserves for following strikes.
Useful thinking there. Though, in effect, the southern armies have been pretty quiet anyway. Perhaps I might formalise it. Hmmm ...
I agree that this is the right approach. The HoI3 supply system operates by trying to supply the farthest-away troops first, so the fact that our troops at the extreme ends of the front are in supply while those nearer to the Trans-Siberian Railway are starving down indicates that the issue is not enough throughout is available in the Siberian interior. I will, however, say that the extensions in the north-east are of secondary importance, at most, and should be readily delayed if more urgent production projects are needed in other areas.
The extensions really aren't very expensive and they can also speed movement when needed, now or later. I'll let them run.
The importance of this is that while they may have some limited land-based naval air capacities, the IJN is by and large toothless now, unable to stop even small forces from traversing quite near to their own home waters. We should have a free hand in an eventual invasion of the Home Islands.
Yes, it was a test run in that context. But those carriers are still out there: naval landing ops conducted outside strong fighter cover later could be hazardous.
Nice to see the Royal Australian Marines doing the business and starting to get the Japanese out of the country, the lack of that unit always seemed a bit of an oversight.
An interesting and well balanced fight down there in this game. I'm hoping they win - even if they are capitalist swine. ;)
Those poor, poor sailors. The Kiev design was so bad that even the Soviet Admiralty (who approved a lot of crap designs for political reasons) thought them dangerous and used them as target hulks. Here the fleet will not be so lucky. :(
How lucky it is that the game effectively glosses over that aspect here. :p
In fairness we were up against a Paradox AI so we always had a free hand on naval matters. ;)

Last I played Japan forgot to garrison the Home Islands, which I remember being a fairly common occurence. Probably worth checking if there even is anyone to resist an invasion.
One can but hope! As an aside, I wonder if the US will ever do anything to them?
I guess the Japanese are fighting harder now that they can't retreat further east. Stuck between the Red Army and the Pacific, not a fun place to be. The Pacific is only just out of reach, I'm sure the Soviet troops on the ground can smell that sea air when the East Wind blows. The last mile is always the longest.
True, true. I thought they might have got that elusive port last month, but no.
Things have bogged down elsewhere, but with Air Superiority, and more than likely additional reserves, I'm sure the Red Army will prevail eventually, even if it costs a couple thousand lives.
Lives given for the Rodina and the greater good.
The Supply problems are a bit worrying, but they are also a product of your success. Throughput is definitely the problem. The further you send supplies, the more you use up along the way, so the more you need to send out at the start. Especially on the first half of the Trans-Siberian railway, up to Irkutsk, you need more capacity. I've already been slowly upgrading the Trans-Siberian in my game since the first of the Infra projects in 'Odin'. Starting from the high Infrastructure area around Moscow just in case. Of course, once you get access to larger Pacific ports, you can supplement the railways with ship-borne supplies, which will significantly alleviate the problem. On that note, I've always found it a bit weird that you can deploy your ships anywhere you can supply overland, and decide where they are deployed once completed. If you were building transports for use off the Siberian Pacific coast, then you would be making them over there, so a supply cutoff would not make the hulls magically move to Sevastopol... I actually decide where I'm building a ship when I start it's production, and then, when it gets delivered, unless I don't have the port anymore, I initially deploy the ship there, even if I may need it far away. Is there actually a mod that ties naval construction to a location/series of locations?
Yes, that ship thing is a bit ridiculous. They definitely should be built in a specific location and lost if it's occupied later. Ground troops - easy enough to evacuate. Even larger equipment (tanks, artillery, planes etc), one can (with a penalty for disruption) logically move factories and pieces in progress elsewhere if needed and determined enough: as of course the Soviets did in WW2.
The Allies seem to finally be getting their act together, well, mostly the Australian Royal Marines. The French in the Philippines clearly have no real plan. They're lucky the IJA hasn't booted their single Division out of Manila already. Then again. Why is there no Japanese Garrison in Manila to begin with? This doesn't bode well for the Japanese Garrisoning their home Islands. As @El Pip already reminded us of this rather too common occurrence where Japan doesn't leave any troops behind in Japan proper.
Once again illustrates how weak the AI often (though not always) is in doing proper naval landings. Re Manila: not sure if the Japanese had anything there and the French fought them out but yes, more likely no garrison. We'll see about the Home Islands. Anything they have there will eventually have nukes falling on it, with luck! :eek:
In fairness to the Kiev-class design, they also had going against them that they'd been started right before Barbarossa and construction was naturally a bit sidelined during the whole big war thing going on, so by the time anyone got around to finishing them they were quite out-of-date.

Of course that doesn't absolve the whole stability issue, but let's not claim that the stability of the ships was uniquely bad. It's not a Soviet submarine after all. :p
And it's our most advanced naval design at the moment! :eek: But work is starting on building a half-decent sub design. Another very optimistic aim for an OTL USSR of this era!
The logistical headaches of fighting a major land war at the end of the Siberan railway ... is an as-yet unresolved equation (although we note the newly proposed proofs and wish them every success).
Yes, I finally had some spare IC and assessed this war in the east still had a good way to go. And I will want to get many of them back west again quickly when it's done. And may end up needing the strategic comms between east and west later depending on what happens when things turn Unthinkable!
This is honestly one of the things that has always bothered me about the HOI series as a whole. In every other Paradox game, construction of ships (and of units in general, for that matter, but it's especially noticeable for naval assets) is always tied to a particular province. I can see some logic to using the magical "deploy anywhere" system for land and air units, since in those cases you can abstract it away as the men being trained and equipment being assembled in facilities spread across the country and then "pooled" wherever the military needs it, but a ship essentially has to be assembled in place -- even if you can prefabricate the different components elsewhere, the hull is going to be sitting in place for a long time before it's in any fit state to move.
Yes, per above, agreed. Still, I can only play the game I'm dealt in this Q&D setting. ;)
I was thinking in the beginning, wow the Japs are giving it all they got to avoid encirclement, and it is definitely a factor, but it seems like mostly the reason was logistics. Army marching on its belly and all that. Good thinking with the infrastructure upgrade, we still have a lot of fighting to do here, potentially all the way to the other side of China. I think we should also check the infra level of newly acquired provinces in the southern sector, because after Irkutsk the Transsiberian Railway turns a bit north to follow the pre-war borders. On the other hand, we'll keep on fighting towards inland China. So after securing provinces, checking the level of infra and building it up to Transsiberian levels would be a good investment.
Will see what we need there in due course - good point.
Capital city moving in Australia didn't cause the supply problem I was worried about, that's good news.
Must be getting supplied by sea in Victoria now - as they must have been in Queensland before Melbourne was lost and then regained.
I like the fast exploitation division, they'll be very useful in the Western Theater when the time comes. But I'd put a Mechanized bde instead of a Mot, AC instead of an Engineer, and take out the Mot AA. It has 5% less CA bonus, but by 1945 it should have 10 kph division speed if Light Armour Engine tech is not very far behind current.
I'm a little more going for sustainability and punch plus river-crossing capability than sheer speed in this case. ENGR for the rivers (they do also boost speed), AA as I'm assuming it will be a difficult air environment and these guys could be out front and exposed. And MOT are cheaper than MECH. Will see how they go. :)
All is going well despite recent setbacks, I'm expecting the war machine to get up to speed very soon!
It is a real grind: had hoped their collapse would be quicker, but then again when we look at where things were in March 1944, after more than eight years of full AI supervision of the USSR and quite a bit vested in it even now, it could be a lot worse. :D
Suitably enough, given this AAR, the exception is perhaps the Soviet Pacific Fleet. Most of the ships, and all of the submarines, were built in European Russian shipyards, cut up and then put onto trains and shipped out along the Trans-Siberian railways for re-assembly. This leads to some odd ship histories were a submarine had it's hull sections pre-fabricated down in the Volga, was "laid down" in a shipyard in Leningrad and then "launched" in Vladivostok. Any of those locations could plausibly claim to be the home province for that submarine. For bonus hilarity the Soviets then spent the entire war trying to get most of their Pacific fleet back into the Baltic and other European waters.

Now I am not for one second suggesting Paradox had this in mind when making the system, or that this unusual exception in anyway justifies their general approach, but it could justify a relaxed approach to deployment locations being taken in this AAR. ;)
That is something I wasn't aware of. May the Gods forfend! :eek:o_O That sound you can hear in the background is my mind boggling! :D For now, my ships have to be ferried across now to the east anyway - by sea!! - so it has become accidentally more realistic in that regard.
OK, that I genuinely did not know... And that's hilarious.

Combining that with what I already knew about pre-Soviet Russia's infamous naval exploits, I'm beginning to see that "Our fleet is in the wrong ocean!" has been something of a running theme for them for quite a while.
Same here. Tsushima redux!

Now, for me it's back to the trusty old HOI3 for more Siberian fun!
 
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The supply problems are mostly caused by the units furtest from the source as they get first priority and hence later units just swamp the net. So building the supply up from the furthest units toward the source should relive the situation a bit if the total actually needed supplies are not greater than the trans-Siberian railroad can manage.

Actually your front is now around where my German offensive was when i stopped playing last time, I think I had around 80 infra upgrades running as the links north and south changes all the time.

Unfortunately the problem can not be solved like you would in real live having separate lines for each front.
 
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The supply problems are mostly caused by the units furtest from the source as they get first priority and hence later units just swamp the net. So building the supply up from the furthest units toward the source should relive the situation a bit if the total actually needed supplies are not greater than the trans-Siberian railroad can manage.

Actually your front is now around where my German offensive was when i stopped playing last time, I think I had around 80 infra upgrades running as the links north and south changes all the time.

Unfortunately the problem can not be solved like you would in real live having separate lines for each front.
Very true. I had already played the next month through and confirmed it was that very issue - I tracked supply production, consumption and distribution through the month and may well put it out as a 'special supplement/report' either within or in addition to the next chapter, depending on space.
 
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Chapter 17 – July 1945

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Chapter 17 – July 1945

AuthAAR’s Notes: Still refining the combat description and presentation – with a bit more info on the map, I’ll try to put less in the text again. Befitting the strategic nature of this game and AAR, there will be stuff on things such as logistics, research, industry, intelligence and some rather interesting goings-on in other (Allied) theatres.

******

Introduction

Taking advice from the 'Politburo' ;) and recognising the difficult supply distribution in the Far East, the 2nd FE Front (1st & 7th Armies) were given more limited objectives.



******

1. Far Northern Sector

The only combat action in the Far North centred on Lazo, where the enemy had been advancing on Tomtor after winning a battle there in June. A small Soviet probe on Lazo from Jakutsk on 1 July was unsuccessful. But The Japanese did not complete their advance into Tomtor: the Soviets slipped a fresh division in there and then launched a four-pronged attack on 11 July, with light air support.


They had won by 13 July, losing 431 men and killing 606 of the enemy, but Lazo had not yet been occupied by the end of the month.

******

2. Ulya-Tyndinskiy Sector

The 6th and 15th Armies shared the central front where the main offensive effort was now concentrated. The northern part of this front saw heavy fighting during the month, though (with increasing distance from the main Soviet air bases), air support was not as heavy as it had been. Only one province was gained, while one was lost but won back by each side. By the end of the month, the Soviets had won a some late battles and were advancing to but had not yet secured a few provinces – and may not, if (as often happens) the enemy slip reinforcements in first.


Operational summary, Far East – Ulya-Tyndinskiy Sector, July 1945.

[Note: The maps now include the dates for each skirmish and battle, to make the sequence of events a little clearer and also as another way of distinguishing the more important ones. Also, I can then put less in the text descriptions. Let me know what you think - especially if taking the units out detracts from your assessment of the position. I've included a broader map with units at the end in the Theatre Summary.]

Stanovoj Hrebet
(five actions), Aidanskoe Nagor’s and Nelkan (four actions each) saw the heaviest fighting during the month. The Soviets won large battles for Enken and Nemuy (both on the Pacific Coast) towards the end of the month, but neither had been occupied.

Aidanskoe Nagor’s was lost by the Soviets on 2 July but regained quickly after a counter-attack on 3 July and reoccupation by 6 July, when a Japanese counter-attack failed to dislodge them. The two major actions here were the defeat of a major Japanese attack from 8-11 July (Soviet 577 v 1,423 Japanese casualties) and another straight after from 11-13 July (Sov 416 v 1,646 Jap) that was also beaten back. The Soviets launched a large attack on Nemuy from there on 18-25 July, winning after a week of bitter and bloody fighting (Sov 1,027 v 2,393 Jap), the largest total ground casualties in a battle on any sector in the East during the month.

Stanovoj Hrebet had been used for the Japanese attack on Aidankoe Nagor’s on 8-11 July. After a short probe on 11 July helped to spoil that attack was not pressed further, a larger Soviet attack from 12-17 July (Sov 1,305 v 1,546 Jap) succeeded. But the lead Soviet elements were in turn attacked as soon as they retook the province on 18 July, losing to Japanese troops attacking from Nemuy and Tyndinskiy, despite ‘spoiling’ air support. The Japanese regained the province on 28 July, when the Soviets won an immediate counter-attack but were then forestalled on 30 July by Japanese reinforcements arriving.

Two Soviet attempts to take Nelkan failed until they won a larger battle – with air support this time - from 13-16 July (Sov 228 v 937 Jap), which overlapped with a failed Japanese attack from Nelkan on Ust’ Maja (12-14 July). The Soviets took Nelkan on 21 July and held of a Japanese counter attack to retain possession by the end of the month. The key northern port of Ulya remained too hard to take for now, but the Soviets attacked Enken in a successful though expensive nine-day battle ending on 25 July (Sov 1,404 v 1,284 Jap).

The only Soviet air raid in the sector that caused more than 500 casualties was on Enken (598).

******

3. Petropavlovsk Kamchatskiy-Solov'ovsk Sector

Similarly to the sector to its north, the line between Petropavlovsk Kamchatskiy and Solov'ovsk saw each side lose and win back one province, while the Soviets gained one outright. Yerofey Pavlovich was the most heavily fought-over province during the month, but had not changed hands by the end of it. The two largest single battles took place in Ust’ Urkima (a Soviet attack won) and Berezitovvy (a Soviet attack lost).


Operational summary, Far East – Petropavlovsk Kamchatskiy-Solov'ovsk Sector, July 1945.

The Japanese occupied Ust’ Urkima on 1 July after having won a battle for it the month before, but they were heavily counter-attacked as soon as they reached it. The Soviets won that battle on 5 July (Sov 1,161 v 1,272 Jap) with heavy air support and retook the province six days later, repelling a short Japanese attempt to drive them out.

Yerofey Pavlovich was first attacked by the Soviets in early July which they won, but then the Japanese reinforced the province and two subsequent Soviet attempts to take it failed. But the fourth attack, following on straight from the third and after eight days of non-stop air strikes, won through. A Japanese attempt to slip a division in on 28 July was soon defeated, but the Soviets were still advancing as the month ended.

The Soviets liberated Mogocha on 6 July after winning a fight for it in June, but a heavy Japanese attack mounted from Petropavlovsk Kamchatskiy during 6-11 July defeated them (no cas report). The Japanese were so determined to win this fight they launched an air attack on the afternoon of 6 July with two unescorted TAC wings, killing 92 Soviet defenders before the interceptors could arrive (late, just as the raid was finishing). The Japanese TAC returned that night, but this time two Soviet INT wings were able to disrupt the raid, heavily damaging one enemy TAC wing and preventing any ground casualties. The Japanese reoccupied Mogocha on 28 July but were attacked straight away by the Soviets, who had won that battle by 30 July and would try to advance secure it in August.

A large Soviet attack on Berezitovvy in mid-July was an expensive failure (Sov 1,312 v 701 Jap), despite heavy air support. But they had better luck in the mountains of Petropavlovsk Kamchatskiy, winning an attack there on 23 July (no cas report) and brushing away more would-be defenders on 31 July, when they occupied it. Naturally, the Japanese counter-attacked immediately from the south and that battle continued as July ended.

The Soviet Air Force struck hard in this sector in July, including in Petropavlovsk Kamchatskiy (5,323), Yerofey Pavlovich (4,925), Ust' Urkima (2,037) and Berezitovvy (1,545).

******

4. The Southern and Mongolian Sectors

Given the revised orders and poor supply in the South around Lake Baikal, there was no ground or air combat in that sector during July. But Mongolian and Soviet 7th Army units were active in Mongolia, with two provinces liberated.


Operational summary, Far East – Mongolian Sector, July 1945.

A joint Soviet-Mongol attack on Dzhirgalanta continued from June until it was heavily defeated on 5 July (Comintern 1,441 v 785 Jap). It did lead to a Japanese attempt to interfere with air strikes on Dzhirgalanta that was itself intercepted over Muren early on 2 July. The Japanese fighters were heavily defeated and not seen again for the rest of the month.


But despite the initial Japanese victory in Dzirgalanta, the Mongolians followed up with an attack of their own which eventually saw the province retaken on 14 July (no report). This coincided with a costly but successful Comintern defence of Taryacin, which had been retaken after victory there in June and was then savagely attacked by the Japanese from 8-14 July (Com 1,441 v 785 Jap). At the end of the month, an attack by a Soviet garrison division on Ubur Khangaiin was launched, but their shock attack was negated by a local counter-attack by a Japanese regular infantry division and, despite air support, it looked unlikely to succeed.

Six days of continuous air strikes supporting the consecutive Comintern and Mongolian attacks on Dzhirgalanta killed 3,728 enemy troops, while 619 had been killed in Ubur Khangaiin as the month ended.

******

5. Logistics

Supply production and distribution was a key focus during the first half of July in particular, with wild swings in demand until a broad balance in production (at least) seemed to be attained, though supply on the ground and along the Trans-Siberian Railway (TSR) to Irkutsk remained problematic. This special report from the Quartermaster General is submitted in part to seek comment and advice from Politburo members [ie you guys :)].

This table summarises selected statistics taken during the month regarding stockpile levels and fluctuations, demand and IC allocations for supply production. At times during the month, alerts stated the stockpile could have emptied in less than three weeks if the current daily deficit was maintained.

Notes to the table:
1. Supply production reached a peak of 150 IC on 12 July and kept steady at 110 IC from 15 July (when I froze it) until the end of the month.
2. The cause of the ‘Convoyed out’ blip (13.20) on 13 July is currently unknown.
3. I have only a glancing familiarity with the supply system, normally I simply adjust production to keep the stockpile balance at where I’m comfortable. And do supply-related research.
4. I don’t really understand how to read/what drives the two big demand factors of ‘Into network’ and ‘Used’, what the latter actually depicts and why it would have fluctuated that wildly. Any expert guidance based on this info and that provided below would be greatly appreciated, as this is becoming a big factor both for general industrial effort and supply on the ground.

In early July, quite a few units were in poor supply, most but not all in the Far East. In the maps below, the top one shows infrastructure, especially the TSR going through Irkutsk. The one below takes a wider angle and shows poor local supply/throughput (?) along the TSR all the way back to the West.


A small supply trade deal was done on 5 July with Luxemburg (2.28 money for 15.26 supplies) – though it didn’t seem to have much of an impact on the ‘traded for’ total subsequently.

Supply on the ground in the east appeared to have improved a bit by 23 July, with only six divisions in poor supply (mainly around Lake Baikal, plus one in the far north-east in Susuman). By 31 July, only the division in Susuman was listed as in poor supply.

The map below shows supply status to the East on 10, 19 and 31 July. The TSR continued to be a choke point, though the situation around Irkutsk in particular showed signs of improvement.



******

6. Naval Operations

The only naval excitement during the month was the loss of a convoy and its escort off the north of Luzon on 4 July as it made the dangerous transit from the West to the Pacific fleet base in Kamchatka. But the Soviets had plenty of both in reserve.



******

7. Diplomacy

Sweden began aligning to the Comintern on 11 July and continued to do so for the rest of the month.

******

8. Research

After a relatively quiet June, July saw a plethora of projects completed.

A major milestone was achieved on 2 July with rocket engines being developed – the team was rolled straight into strategic rocket development. [A question: anyone ever bother with rocket interceptors? I wasn’t going to, but if there’s any value I’d be interested in hearing.]


Four days later medium tank guns were brought up to contemporary standards. Following on from rocket engine research, work was started on jet engine theory.


On 7 July nuclear physics research matured to the next level. It was discontinued for now, with the last of the ‘Level 5’ medium tank techs being undertaken - into reliability.


On 15 July two projects were completed. The first Soviet helicopter prototype was developed: but in an oversight that would be blamed on Five-Year-Plan bureaucrats in Moscow, researchers didn’t roll straight into applying this to either medical evacuation or pilot rescue. It would have to be taken up some time in August. [Didn’t realise I’d missed this until I was reviewing the screenshots when writing up the chapter. :oops: Will get to them as slots are freed up next time.]


Invasion tactics were worked out on the same day and the work continued: the less time Soviet marines were exposed to sea or air interdiction while trying to get ashore could well be crucial, given the small and primitive navy available to protect the landing craft and transports.


Medium tank armour was brought up to contemporary standards on 20 July, with the important area of artillery barrels and ammunition the next to be focused on.


The drive to improve submarine AA continued on 26 July.


And with medium tanks being brought further up to standard on 28 July, more work went into submarine air warning equipment.


Finally, on 31 July the first advance in strategic bomber armament (a lower priority area, but feel I should do some there for realism) was made, with work going into improving the efficiency of Soviet radar systems (important for the possible next war with the imperialists capitalists and their running dogs).



******

9. Production

With huge supply production increases being implemented in July, there was little room for new production projects, with most not being replaced when they were completed. For most of the month, there was a substantial ‘below the line’ element in the production queue.

First, on 11 July, some high-cost projects were sent to the bottom of the queue to absorb the shortfall (see a summary at the end of this section – armour and aircraft, primarily). On 14 July, construction of the often-delayed battleship Sovyetskiy Soyuz was suspended yet again and sent to the bottom of the queue. Better than to the bottom of the sea!

A new wing of Tu-2T NAV was finished on 16 July, but was deployed initially in Moscow to minimise supply consumption, but a new MOT brigade was added to 15 Mot Div in the 15th Army, bringing it to four brigades (LARM, 2 x MOT, AC).

The second level of work was finished on the original nuclear reactor in Mytishchi on 23 July and construction was continued at a slightly reduced cost while the expansion came on line. This was one area where, despite the expense, strategic considerations came out on top.


On 30 July, the air base at Mutina expanded to Level 7 facilities. Given supply demands and its increasing distance from the central front, no more work was ordered for it. And on 31 July, two ENGR brigades were deployed to divisions in 15th Army, bringing 123 SD (2 x INF, AT, ARTY, ENGR) and 32 SD (4 x INF, ENGR) to five brigades each.

The tables below show changes in production queues and IC distribution between 11 and 31 July. The production shortfall remained at around 70 IC despite a reduction in the queue, caused by a large increase of upgrade demand with recent research advances.


Note: I will have to kill off those small supply export (?) convoys I've just spotted!

******

10. Intelligence and Security

The Finns were reportedly building their resistance bases once more on 6 July (revolt risk map shown below). The whole Axis would need to be defeated before a Communist puppet government could be installed to remove this irritation.


The sinking of the convoy to Kamchatka had temporarily affected NU (-0.441 vs +0.370 spies raising NU), but at 80.413% NU was strong behind the war effort.

On 12 July, the large surplus in ready spies (21) was employed to infiltrate Turkey.


They were fully established the next day, revealing Turkish domestic spy strength (5) and other information.


After no problems were encountered for the next six days, the Soviet teams were ordered to conduct a full counter-espionage mission to try to erode Turkish security capability on 19 July. [Note: I'd appreciate any views on whether 'our party' influence and or covert ops would be of any use and what likelihood there would be of being able to conduct a successful coup (something I've never really tried in a game) and whether it's ever really worth it. If not, what other missions would you suggest once counter-espionage has been successful?]

On 22 July, with Soviet spy strength holding up well, and Manchurian and Japanese domestic spy strength at just zero and one respectively, the mission in both countries was switched from counter-espionage to full NU disruption.

The Japanese Kempeitai started the month with three teams, adding one and losing one to Soviet action to finish with three, with no Soviet agents lost. Japanese national unity had decreased by 0.4% from 65.8% to 65.4% (some of which was likely to be from convoy losses).

Manchukuo started the month with three agent teams at home, losing one to Soviet action and another to unknown causes to finish with one, with no Soviet spies neutralised. Manchurian national unity had decreased by 0.3% from 67.9% to 67.6%.

Turkey had five spy teams when the Soviet mission there started on 13 July, losing two to Soviet action bud adding two to remain at five by month’s end. They were able to neutralise one Soviet agent. National unity, not targeted by the Soviets in July, increased by 0.1% from 69.6% to 69.7%.

Fewer enemy agents (31) were neutralised in July compared to June (37). The UK was yet again had top number of agents lost (four), three again from Germany, two from Italy and the two Turkish agents detained there, the rest from Allied and neutral powers.

******

11. Theatre Summaries

The Far Eastern Theatre saw Soviet gains in the Centre and Mongolia, a number of important victories and potential advances in August. But July had proven ground was hard to hold for both sides after initial seizure. The most positive aspect for the Soviets was that a division of the Japanese forces into a smaller northern and larger southern enclave was within reach.


Total confirmed Soviet losses in land combat were up by a little over 2,000 compared to June at 13,647, with just 92 lost to one Japanese air raid for a total (known) of 13,739.

With the operational tempo up again despite the supply problems in the south, the Japanese and their puppets lost 17,332 men (around 4,300 more than in June) in ground combat and 19,957 to air strikes (about 600 fewer than June). Total Japanese/Axis casualties were therefore 37,289, over 3,700 more than in June.


This map shows terrain and general unit dispositions in the Far East as at 2300hr on 31 July 1945.

[Note: let me know if, with the units stripped out of the sector summary maps for simplicity, if this is enough detail for readers. If you’d like more in key sectors, I can find some way of squeezing it in, or add it by request in an appendix of space is an issue.]

******

In South East Asia, the Allies have again failed to wrap up Malaya and Singapore … but look at what has happened in the Philippines – an explosion! After we all dissed the AI for not doing these things well in general and specifically in this case. :D


The expansion of the invasion from Manila was first noticed by the Soviets early on 4 July, with expansion to a Franco-English invasion force of four divisions rapidly moving in all direction, seemingly on with Japanese HQs (not) opposing them.


The lodgement had grown to take the southern half of Luzon by 19 July and an island-hopping advance had begun to its south. By 31 July, more units were ashore and still advancing north against flimsy resistance – if any. Allied air and naval units had taken advantage of the bases freed up.


And a light French division was making rapid progress along the island chain leading to Mindanao – whose northern coast at Cagayan de Oro was its next stop.


Allied management in Malaya was far less efficient. The many divisions heading there in late June had halted the Japanese advance and retaken Kuala Lumpur by the beginning of 4 June – but some were already beginning to turn back north before the job was fully done. Again.


This situation was even more lamentable by the end of the month.


It seemed they were all headed back north by strategic movement, some perhaps to a French amphibious fleet in Haiphong. Judging by the damage they had suffered, they had been in action during the Philippines campaign.


STAVKA hoped that, if it ever came to war with the French-led Allies, it would be the planners of the Malaya campaign and not the Philippines invasion that were in charge!

******

There had been little movement in Australia, though it was noticed the Australians had built up a considerable air force, all of which was based at Geelong, just west of Melbourne.


And there had been movement in the Pacific – but the results were mixed. The Americans had retaken the large naval base in Guam with a division of marines. But had lost Midway Island!

 
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Wow. Philippines. That's pretty heartening. Of course, in teh grand scheme of things it doesn't mean all that much, but still nice.

Keeping the pressure up in Siberia - I don't doubt that is the way to go.
 
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[Note: The maps now include the dates for each skirmish and battle, to make the sequence of events a little clearer and also as another way of distinguishing the more important ones. Also, I can then put less in the text descriptions. Let me know what you think - especially if taking the units out detracts from your assessment of the position. I've included a broader map with units at the end in the Theatre Summary.]
I think this way is quite good. Actually, your gut feeling about how to do it is usually good so don't second guess yourself I enjoy the changes in style.

4. I don’t really understand how to read/what drives the two big demand factors of ‘Into network’ and ‘Used’, what the latter actually depicts and why it would have fluctuated that wildly. Any expert guidance based on this info and that provided below would be greatly appreciated, as this is becoming a big factor both for general industrial effort and supply on the ground.
From my understanding of logistics in HoI3, and that may be wrong, let me try to explain:
Every unit every day tries to draw supply in the province it resides (except strategic redeployment, during which the supplies the unit requests still go to the province in the beginning of the SR due to a bug so during SR the units just harry whichever province they happen to be passing through without regarding those provinces being lifelines carrying supply to the active front or whatever) and each province tries to draw supply from neighboring provinces. This effectively means if your front is 200 provinces away from your capital and it suddenly starts consuming more supplies it might take 200 days for the supply situation to be ok again.

There's one thing that I'm not sure of which is provinces with IC in them. I think they directly produce supplies on a pro-rata basis so it doesn't really take 200 days for the above example and the supply produced say in Irkutsk goes some way to rectify the situation once the mules they put the supply on from Moscow arrive at Vladivostok. Be it from provinces with industry, or from the capital, the amount of supplies put in the network is "into network" and the amount of supplies actually used by divisions that day is "used".

Another thing I'm not really sure about is the returns. Since there is quite a lot of lag in this system, many times supplies arrive at places where nobody needs them. They probably return the same 200 province long way back to the capital. That's returned supplies.

As I said, all of the above can just be horseshit and my imagination but that's the feeling I get from the game.

A major milestone was achieved on 2 July with rocket engines being developed – the team was rolled straight into strategic rocket development. [A question: anyone ever bother with rocket interceptors? I wasn’t going to, but if there’s any value I’d be interested in hearing.]
They can only be useful in specific situations. They seem to have high fuel consumption but are actually so fast that in the end they probably end up using less fuel and the speed is great for dogfights and they can be produced fast but the good things end there. The range is a bummer (less than a third of a regular interceptor), so if you believe you'll need point defence in the western theater to protect your airbases they can be useful for that. Otherwise not so much.

work was started on jet engine theory.
Yay!

Five-Year-Plan bureaucrats in Moscow
I'm sure there's a Brentatovich somewhere there :D

After no problems were encountered for the next six days, the Soviet teams were ordered to conduct a full counter-espionage mission to try to erode Turkish security capability on 19 July. [Note: I'd appreciate any views on whether 'our party' influence and or covert ops would be of any use and what likelihood there would be of being able to conduct a successful coup (something I've never really tried in a game) and whether it's ever really worth it. If not, what other missions would you suggest once counter-espionage has been successful?]
I unsuccessfully tried coups a few times before giving up, but I also remember seeing AARs in which people pulled it off so I think it was my inadequacy so I'm also curious about the answers that'll come to this.

Maybe it seems like the speed of progress has halted in the last 2 months, but I think it's gaining up some steam again, and we're about to reach the Pacific finally. I hope the subs are repaired enough to stop Japanese convoys once the noose is closed.
 
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roverS3

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The front looks quite static, but it's going in the right direction, and troops are now actively marching straight towards the Pacific. Let's just hope no Japanese manage to place themselves in their way. The VVS is doing a stellar job, especially in Mongolia and the Central sector. Mongolia does look quite secure now, fears of it's imminent collapse are clearly in the past now.

My understanding of supply mechanics is pretty much the same as @diskoerekto so I won't repeat what he wrote.

Congratulations on the expanded Nuclear Reactor.

The focus on amphibious invasion tactics continues to be an interesting departure form OTL.

I'd love to see a Communist coup attempt in Turkey, even if it fails. You're spending a lot on intelligence, so it only makes sense to go all the way. I haven't attempted any coups in-game, bur from what I've read: The higher the support for your party, the higher the chance a coup will stick.

The Philippines operation seems directly linked to the failures in Malaysia. The Allies seem to prioritise other areas of SE Asia over Malaysia for some reason. As Japan didn't bother to Garrison the Philippines, the Allies had free reign as soon as they started shipping in reinforcements, from Malaysia. It looks like the Allies are now going all in on the Philippines, sending their troops in Malaysia to waiting transports in Saigon etc. All that, while the units already in the Philippines should be enough to mop up the area and deal with that lone HQ, and possible (but unlikely) Garrison Divisions in the ports. The Allies are winning despite themselves as they're taking more ground in the Philippines than they are losing in Malaysia. The lesson for the SU is to man all fronts and watch out for the Allies moving troops around by sea.

The Royal Australian Air Forces looks quite potent, I'm impressed. Lend-Lease no-doubt had a hand in that. (maybe expeditionary forces?)

Will the Red Army capitalise on it's victories and reach the Pacific within the next week? Or will the Japanese Empire push back, taking advantage of shorter supply routes to frustrate the Soviet Bear once again?
 
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