Paradox's Statements About Cities: Skylines 2

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CensoredLOL

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Nov 15, 2023
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Found this from an article, and did some additional research on publicly facing sites.

"“As for the release of new games, feelings are mixed,” the publisher says in its latest financial report. “Cities Skylines 2 is the big release of the quarter, and we are upset that we didn’t live up to players’ performance expectations and couldn’t release on all platforms at the same time. The game has still sold well, and by the end of the quarter we had sold more than a million copies. At the same time, it is clear that we can and must do better. Since release, we’ve been working hard on improvements and are fully committed to continuing to improve and develop the game, because we strongly believe in its future and are doing everything we can to get there.”"

-Paradox


"2023 has been a year during which we’ve reached many milestones. We set a new revenue record, in the full year and in the quarter, we have stably more than six million players and we end the year with a very strong financial position. At the same time, we’re unable to relax. EBIT is at a level we are not happy with after a large write-down, and the quarter's game releases have not held the quality we want. There is certainly potential to reach even higher."

-Fredrik Wester, CEO of Paradox Interactive
 
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It would be nice if you provided some links to where you got these statements from :)
 
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It would be nice if you provided some links to where you got these statements from :)
Sure, wasn't sure if posting outside links would be moderated.

Article:

Paradox's Year-end statement
 
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Found this from an article, and did some additional research on publicly facing sites.

"“As for the release of new games, feelings are mixed,” the publisher says in its latest financial report. “Cities Skylines 2 is the big release of the quarter, and we are upset that we didn’t live up to players’ performance expectations and couldn’t release on all platforms at the same time. The game has still sold well, and by the end of the quarter we had sold more than a million copies. At the same time, it is clear that we can and must do better. Since release, we’ve been working hard on improvements and are fully committed to continuing to improve and develop the game, because we strongly believe in its future and are doing everything we can to get there.”"

-Paradox


"2023 has been a year during which we’ve reached many milestones. We set a new revenue record, in the full year and in the quarter, we have stably more than six million players and we end the year with a very strong financial position. At the same time, we’re unable to relax. EBIT is at a level we are not happy with after a large write-down, and the quarter's game releases have not held the quality we want. There is certainly potential to reach even higher."

-Fredrik Wester, CEO of Paradox Interactive
Message to CO and Paradox: Hire more people to fix the game. If you want to make big money on the console version, the current status of the game (not performance, I mean playability, options and features of the game itself) it's not the best way to bring new console players to the game).
 
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This is good. They recognise they fumbled the ball and can't rest on their laurels.

I've worked in enough enterprise organisations where the leadership are so far removed from the realities of their operations that they may as well be huffing paint on the job. At least PDX, by publicly stating that they recognise that there's problems they need to solve, and solve fast, they show they're at least active.

At the next meeting they should strategise how to bring in additional resources to CO to get CS2 to the level of playability that it could potentially reach. I don't know how they could technically do it, but they need to try. And, while they're at it, a public roadmap to bring performance improvements to mid- and low-level machines. I believe it's no coincidence that the number of people who exceed the game's recommended specs roughly correlates with the number of people still playing the game.

Get to it, PDX!
 
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This is good. They recognise they fumbled the ball and can't rest on their laurels.

I've worked in enough enterprise organisations where the leadership are so far removed from the realities of their operations that they may as well be huffing paint on the job. At least PDX, by publicly stating that they recognise that there's problems they need to solve, and solve fast, they show they're at least active.

At the next meeting they should strategise how to bring in additional resources to CO to get CS2 to the level of playability that it could potentially reach. I don't know how they could technically do it, but they need to try. And, while they're at it, a public roadmap to bring performance improvements to mid- and low-level machines. I believe it's no coincidence that the number of people who exceed the game's recommended specs roughly correlates with the number of people still playing the game.

Get to it, PDX!
I hope you're right.

My interpretation was that it just felt like some bone throwing to investors and the inevitable pickup here. What I saw you say in another thread holds water here, I think. If the CEO has to acknowledge it, it must be bad. My advice, if I could reply to the comment, would be that hopefully they're serious sentiments for all involved. If not, we've seen this sort of story play out before, and they might just get caught in the same media trap they paid so much money cultivating. I think people are basically waiting to find out and give every benefit of doubt possible. I know I'm trying to.
 
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I hope you're right.

My interpretation was that it just felt like some bone throwing to investors and the inevitable pickup here. What I saw you say in another thread holds water here, I think. If the CEO has to acknowledge it, it must be bad. My advice, if I could reply to the comment, would be that hopefully they're serious sentiments for all involved. If not, we've seen this sort of story play out before, and they might just get caught in the same media trap they paid so much money cultivating. I think people are basically waiting to find out and give every benefit of doubt possible. I know I'm trying to.

Exactly right. If they are serious, as you say, they will show it with their next actions. I'm basing my ideas off the fact that they wrote this in an investor-facing document. One of the reasons I'm taking this as something more serious is that I'm counting on stakeholder (not shareholder, stakeholder; that is, all the people within and outside the company that have a stake in CS2) expectations to really affect the leadership to the point where they are being forced to take action.

The next steps will determine what the plan is. And to be frank, if they stick with trying to sell us DLC to a game that can't perform well on recommended-spec machines, let alone minimum-spec ones, how do they expect to make sales? The game has to work **for us** in order for us to want to buy DLC in the first place.

Ball's in your court, Fred.
 
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Message to CO and Paradox: Hire more people to fix the game. If you want to make big money on the console version, the current status of the game (not performance, I mean playability, options and features of the game itself) it's not the best way to bring new console players to the game).
I suggest you read the classic "the mythical man month".
Bringing in more people in times of trouble can make tings worse. Training new team members, while they get familiar with the code base to the point where they can productively fix bugs might take so much time from existing team members, that the game could be fixed quicker if the exiting team just works on it.
 
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I suggest you read the classic "the mythical man month".
Bringing in more people in times of trouble can make tings worse. Training new team members, while they get familiar with the code base to the point where they can productively fix bugs might take so much time from existing team members, that the game could be fixed quicker if the exiting team just works on it.

That's a superficial way to see it.

Stuff like animations, sounds, assets and models don't require training and they can be easily outsourced while the main team work on code.

So in those aspects the game development would benefit from more people thrown at it
 
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I suggest you read the classic "the mythical man month".
Bringing in more people in times of trouble can make tings worse. Training new team members, while they get familiar with the code base to the point where they can productively fix bugs might take so much time from existing team members, that the game could be fixed quicker if the exiting team just works on it.
As they use Unity engine, which it's an "standard" they can use new people for easy basic task and keep the older employees to fix some of the things related with the custom core of the game, for example. Or more artists to give extra content to the game and at least please players and don't focus on some other problems: For example, different textures in different types of farms or mines.

Or just get prepared for future modifications or updates of the game. Right now, as Wow said, they are mainly focus on modding and some bugs, but there is also other work to do to keep the game updated like they did on CS1 (remember they added European Style, attached buildings). One of the problems in CS2 is despite the assets can look different, is that there are in fact a really few quantity of them, and cities look very repetitive very soon.

Just give free things to players while you work on solving game mechanics bugs and problems, at least they will be somehow pleased or happy while they wait for the game fix.
 
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It's been said the game was first planned for release in late 2020, it then was released 3 years later, in a very buggy state.

I think people aught to lower their expectations, I am not so sure they can fix this game in the next year, I'm thinking years, if at all. They might want to cut their loses, use this dumpster fire of a release as a learning lesson, and start afresh.
 
They sold million+ pre-orders. That's why nothing will ever change.

If no-one had pre-ordered this at all they'd be lucky to have sold 50,000 copies, then maybe their next game would have released in a workable state that "matched our expectations".
 
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They certainly will not have a good 2024 if they dont get their head out of the sand and bend over backwards to fix their dumpster fire release of CS2. Im not convinced they know how badly they disappointed everyone.
 
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I suggest you read the classic "the mythical man month".
Bringing in more people in times of trouble can make tings worse. Training new team members, while they get familiar with the code base to the point where they can productively fix bugs might take so much time from existing team members, that the game could be fixed quicker if the exiting team just works on it.
I suggest you assess the situation at hand instead of quoting a book written 50 years ago about a different situation. They don't even have someone to peruse the bug reports, for god's sake! As for the developpers, there are bugs they're obviously unable to fix, like the assets import, so some outsourced talent could very much help.
 
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They certainly will not have a good 2024 if they dont get their head out of the sand and bend over backwards to fix their dumpster fire release of CS2. Im not convinced they know how badly they disappointed everyone.

Well, they are kinda forced to fix the game otherwise nobody would buy their DLCs and they would have no income since they don't make other games.

Hopefully that won't cause the closing of the studio.
 
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Well, they are kinda forced to fix the game otherwise nobody would buy their DLCs and they would have no income since they don't make other games.

Hopefully that won't cause the closing of the studio.
more than third of people that bought the game thinks otherwise... honestly? if they not gonna fix it in 2-3 months, to work at least at "good" level, noone will cry about them getting closed. They had too much time, too much resources and too many occasions to actually catch up. For me, and many other people, this studio and publisher doesnt exist anymore, not a single game that have CO or PDX in tags, wont get my attention, even if its free.

Only thing that could save them is to allow refunds, then they could get gamers respect back. But they wont.
 
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I suggest you read the classic "the mythical man month".
Bringing in more people in times of trouble can make tings worse. Training new team members, while they get familiar with the code base to the point where they can productively fix bugs might take so much time from existing team members, that the game could be fixed quicker if the exiting team just works on it.
you obviously never touched unity or any programming... man, look at steam or reddit posts, theres thousands of people that could fix the game with mods ;) and mods arent just made in paint, yea, they are made with letters, called code...
 
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I think people aught to lower their expectations, I am not so sure they can fix this game in the next year, I'm thinking years, if at all. They might want to cut their loses, use this dumpster fire of a release as a learning lesson, and start afresh.

I paid for a functional product with promises of up to 10 years of support. I didn't pay for a company that's far richer than me to "learn a lesson". I'm not hating on the product or the company, we know the state of the game and I have patience, but I certainly would not want to see it become abandonware so soon after I parted with my money. BioWare and Mass Effect Andromeda spring to mind: "We're sorry you are upset that we did a bad job, no more updates for you." - I'm unlikely to trust them with a purchase again after that.
 
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