Imperator - Development Diary - 12th of November 2018

Imperator - Development Diary - 12th of November 2018

  • Crusader Kings III Available Now!

    The realm rejoices as Paradox Interactive announces the launch of Crusader Kings III, the latest entry in the publisher’s grand strategy role-playing game franchise. Advisors may now jockey for positions of influence and adversaries should save their schemes for another day, because on this day Crusader Kings III can be purchased on Steam, the Paradox Store, and other major online retailers.


    Real Strategy Requires Cunning

Trin Tragula

Game Designer - Imperator
Moderator
28 Badges
Aug 1, 2003
6.460
11.504
  • Victoria: Revolutions
  • IPO Investor
  • Paradox Order
  • Mount & Blade: Warband
  • Europa Universalis IV: Pre-order
  • Crusader Kings II: Holy Knight (pre-order)
  • 500k Club
  • 200k Club
  • Victoria 2: Heart of Darkness
  • Victoria 2: A House Divided
  • Victoria 2
  • Sengoku
  • Semper Fi
  • Rome Gold
  • Europa Universalis III Complete
  • March of the Eagles
  • Magicka
  • Europa Universalis III Complete
  • Heir to the Throne
  • Hearts of Iron III
  • For the Motherland
  • For The Glory
  • Divine Wind
  • Europa Universalis III Complete
  • Deus Vult
  • Crusader Kings II
  • Arsenal of Democracy
Hello again!

Today I am here, somewhat belatedly, to talk about the how religion works in the game, as well as the starting setup in Anatolia and the Aegean. :)

Religion
In the ancient world religion was not quite as important as in the periods covered by some of our other games, like the age of reformation in Europa Universalis or the Crusades in Crusader Kings. That does not mean however that religion was inconsequential in the ancient world. While syncretism was common there was also great variety in the many pantheons of the era and things like the cult of Fortune and worship Serapis in some ways transcended the different religious spheres. In Imperator each Country, Character and Pop will belong to one of the 22 religions in the game. These will be the source of flavor but also of some direct gameplay effects:

  • Perhaps most importantly pops that are of another religion to your country will not be as happy or productive under your rule.
  • Characters of another religion to your country will have a lower maximum loyalty to the state.
  • Pops ruled by a governor of their own religion will be happier and more productive, while the happiness of pops under a governor of a foreign religion will be less happy and more prone to unrest.
  • Religion does not modify opinion between countries but in diplomacy a country of another religion will be somewhat less likely to accept your proposals.
  • Characters of the wrong religion are also less likely to be elected for office in a Republic.

tyche.png


In addition you can spend religious power to invoke Omens, to Sacrifice to the Gods and increase stability and on Invoking Devotio to reduce War Exhaustion.

Each country is able to invoke an Omen for a price of Religious Power (currently 200 as base). The power and the length of an Omen can be modified by things like ideas, government officials, events, laws and many other things. Unlike in Europa Universalis:Rome an Omen can never directly fail - giving you a negative effect.

The name and description of the Omens depends on your religion and culture. A Greek country following the Hellenic faith will for instance seek the Blessings of Ares, Athena, or Tyche. While a Roman one will instead turn to Mars, Minerva or Fortuna. This is also reflected in events and text that reference the gods (and of course in the variety of events available).

religions.png


Pop religion can change either by direct intervention of the state, using religious power, or through the use of the religious conversion governor policy.
Characters will generally not change their religion but may do so on their own accord through events, especially if they are ambitious and wanting to pursue a career in the service of the state. You can also demand that your characters change their religion directly, though they may not necessarily appreciate that.

In India Buddhism is a still young and spreading religion which will be reflected in a tendency for characters and pops there to switch to it through events.

The religions currently in the game are:
  • Hellenic: Having spread from the Greek heartland, the Olympian pantheon is venerated by many. The names, aspects and hierarchy of many of the gods can vary widely from region to region, however, Zeus, or Jupiter as he is known to the Romans, is regarded as the figurehead of the Olympian pantheon.
  • Kemetic: The history of the indigenous Egyptian religion stretches back many thousands of years. Manifesting as a polytheistic faith, the worship of Ra, Atum, Sekhmet and others, displays a deep reverence for the fundamental aspects of the natural world.
  • Canaanite: The Canaanite religion venerates a number of Gods and their aspects, in a polytheistic manner. Baal is regarded as the chief deity in a complex hierarchy of lesser gods, which were often worshipped at shrines found on mountains or hilltops. At the start of the game the Canaanite religion is primarily found in Phoenicia and Phoenician colonies, such as Carthage.
  • Zalmoxian: Whether Zalmoxis was originally a prophet or a god, is unknown. The Dacians and Getae however, revere Zalmoxis as a divine being, ascribing many miraculous acts to him.
  • Druidic: Druids acted for the Celts, as a distinct social class. Often acting as magistrates and lawmakers, they also dictated local religious customs and beliefs. Druidic faiths are primarily found in Iberia, Gaul and the British Isles at the start of the game.
  • Iberic: Essentially a hybrid polytheistic religion, Iberian religious practices involve the veneration of animal spirits, as well as ancestor worship. Various Hellenic and Phoenician gods were worshipped by the Iberians, as well as local deities such as Betatun or Ataecina.
  • Jewish: Unusually amongst contemporary faiths, Judaism is a monotheistic religion. Following a series of prophets and teachers, the Jewish holy book, the Torah, contains the details of a covenant created between God and the children of Israel.
  • Zoroastrian: The prophet Zoroaster taught of a monotheistic faith in the Creator-God Ahuramazda. Evolving out of early Indo-Iranian polytheism, great reverence is shown for the 'eternal law', or, Daena, which espouses good and righteous conduct.
  • Matrist: Little is known of the Baltic tribes and their religion. Nonetheless, records survive, telling of cults worshipping a mother goddess, along the baltic coast.
  • North African: The ancient culture and religion was a melting pot of traditional egyptian beliefs, star-worship, and ancestor veneration. Many megaliths - stone constructs raised in honor of the gods - still exist, dotted about the African landscape.
  • Tuistic: The ancient Germanic god for Tius, Teiws, or Tuisto, was worshipped by the early migratory tribes from modern-day Scandinavia. Many accounts suggest that the Germanic people practiced a largely animist religion, venerating the earth and sky, and the life force of all living things.
  • Arabic: Religion in Arabia was a polytheistic mixture of deities, aspects and demons, practiced in localities and enclaves around the region. Allah, the Creator-God, may have been worshipped as the head of the pantheon during this period, in some locations.
  • Ritualist: Representing a variety of localized faiths and folk religions, Ritualism espouses ancestor-worship, animism, and votive offerings
  • Buddhist: A relatively young religion, Buddhism arose in Northern India, following the life of Siddhartha Gautama, or simply, Buddha. The Buddha was an ascetic teacher, who spoke of the Middle Way, throughout India.
  • Hindu: Hinduism evolved out of the Vedic period, shepherded by the creation of the Upanishads, and was widely followed throughout India during early antiquity.
  • Bön: Bön represents a collection of folk religions originally practiced on the Tibetan plateau. Aspects of ancestor worship and animism appear frequently, as well as nascent polytheism.
  • Heptadic: Originating in Scythian lands, this pantheistic faith worshipped seven principal gods, often equated to those of the Greek pantheon. Elements of the earlier polytheistic folk religion of the scythians still remains, as does the practice of horse sacrifice and chariot burials, similar to those of the Celts.
  • Cybelene: The Phrygian cult of Cybele is linked to prehistoric Mother-Goddess worship. Evolving over thousands of years, the cult of Cybele often claimed relationship to mythical figures and heroes, and practiced their religion with the veneration of idols.
  • Khaldic: The Khaldic pantheon represents a religion which grew out of the Urartian culture, many centuries before. A principally polytheistic faith, the chief god was known as Khaldi, and was worshipped as a warrior god.
  • Armazic: Possibly connected to the nearby Anatolian religions, the pantheon of the Caucasian-Iberia region was ruled over by the god Armaz.
  • Chaldean: The history of the Chaldean pantheon stretches back many thousands of years. Worshipping gods such as Anu, Enki and Nanna, the devotees of the Chaldean religion construct imposing temples in honor of their chosen God.


Anatolia in 450 AUC / 304 BCE
anatolia.PNG


The Aegean and the Ionian Coast
aegean.png
In 304 BC the well populated parts of Anatolia is almost entirely dominated by the empire of Antigonus, former Satrap of Phrygia. Settled by Greeks centuries ago the Anatolian coastline has a number of rich cities that are in most ways an integral part of the Greek world. Antigonus policy towards the greek cities has been of relative benevolence and autonomy. The cities have not generally been garrisoned, instead they have been organized in Koines or city leagues, hearkening back to the old leagues that existed in the region before its conquest by Persia and later Alexander the Great.

Local adversaries of the Antigonids in the near time has been both Cassander and Ptolemy. The later a long term ally of many of the island countries of the Aegean. The recent Battle of Salamis has however has seen the Ptolemaic fleet crushed and resulted in almost total Antigonid hegemony among the islands, with the notable exceptions of Rhodes and Kos.

Anatolia is also the starting point of the old Persian Royal Road, which still connects the region with the Syria, Mesopotamia and beyond.

Starting Countries:
aegeanpolitical.png
  • Aeolia: Republic representing the cities of the Aeolian League, or League of Ilion. While a league of Aeolian cities has existed on and off for hundreds of years, this particular one has been re-enacted as part of Antigonus policy to safeguard the rights of the free Greek cities. Starts as a feudatory of Phrygia.
  • Ionia: Republic presenting the cities of the Ionian League. Like Aeolia this league has been recreated when the cities came under Antigonid control. It is led by the Antigonid lieutenant Hipparchos of Cyrene. Starts as a Feudatory of Phrygia.
  • Miletos: Republic on the Anatolian coast. Once a powerful city and the point of origin for many of the Greek colonists who have settled along the Black Sea Coast. Miletos was freed by Antigonus early in the wars of the successors and at start enjoys its freedom relatively undisturbed. Miletos starts as an independent city.
  • Kos: Small island Republic that was perhaps most known for being one of the few places to produce mediterranean silk, and for its medical school, said to have been founded by Hippokrates. Kos is a long term ally of the Ptolemies in Egypt but with the withdrawal of all Ptolemaic forces after the battle of Salamis they now stand alone. In 304 BCE Kos was, and would continue to be, a major center of culture. This is the home of a number of interesting characters, both in medicine, such as Proxagoras, as well as poets and scholars as Berosus, Philitas, Herodas, many of whom would eventually find their way to Ptolemaic Alexandria. Kos starts as a Feudatory of Egypt.
  • Nesiotic League: The nesiotic league, or league of the islanders, has been created by the Antigonids to organize the many islands of the Aegean. While they may seem peripheral these islands are the source of many goods that are highly sought after in the greater mediterranean world. Glass, silk, marble, precious and base metals can all be extracted from these islands. It’s capital is the sacred city of Delos.
  • Halikarnassos: An old colony of Troizen in the agean the port of Halikarnassos remains an independent city. In his recent excursion into the region Ptolemy attempted to seize it by force, but was repelled by Demetrius Poliorcetes. Halikarnassos starts as a feudatory of Phrygia.
  • Andros: Small island nation between Euboea and the Nesiotic league, aligned with the Ptolemids in Egypt. Andros starts as a feudatory of Egypt.
  • Knidos: Small city state in coastal Caria. Would become known for its medical school, though it was not as famous or influential as that of nearby Kos. Knidos starts as a Feudatory of Phrygia.
  • Rhodes: Island Republic known for its highly praised workshops, shipyards and for some of the toughest fortifications in the Mediterranean. Like Kos the Rhodian state is a friend of the Ptolemids, but after the battle of Salamis these are not a present factor in the Aegean. Rhodes itself has recently withstood a spectacular year long siege by Antigonus son, Demetrius. Despite employing considerable resources and technical innovations the Demetrius failed to take the city, earning himself the nickname Poliorcetes, “the besieger” in the process. Rhodes would in time rise to become a considerable center of production and a respectable naval power, as well a close ally of the Ptolemies. Famously the Rhodians would use the many siege machines left behind by Demetrius to create a monument over their victory in the form of a giant Colossus, later named as one of the wonders of the ancient world. Rhodos starts independent and has a decision available to it to construct the colossus to commemorate its recent siege.
colosus.png


Western Anatolia: The Hellespont, Phrygia & Paphlagonia
helespontine.png
While central Anatolia has been involved in a number of campaigns of the successors, and is now firmly under the control of the Antigonids, the north western coast is home to a number of small states of increasing autonomy. As elsewhere the Antigonid policy has been to maintain the freedom of Greek cities, with cities such as Astakos, Kios and Calchedon and Byzantium enjoying the protection of the larger Phrygian realm. This has so far thwarted the attempts of local dynasts such as Zipoetes in Bithynia, Dionysius in Heraclea Pontica or even the massive Thracian realm of Lysimachos.

Should the Antigonid realm, Phrygia in our game, fail the days of these small cities may well be numbered however.

Starting Countries:
helespontinepolitical.png
  • Phrygia: The realm of Antigonus “the one-eyed” Monophthalmus and Demetrius “the besieger” Poliorketes. Phrygia is in many ways the most successful of the Successor kingdoms at this date. Even if Antigonus himself is a very old man by now he has consistently beaten the armies of the other successors and come closer than anyone else to reforming Alexander’s empire. In 304 BCE the Antigonid realm has enemies in all the great powers of the Hellenistic world, but still enjoys a very favorable reputation among the many Greek cities of the Mediterranean. Unlike his opposition Antigonus is known for protecting their freedom and not leaving his own garrisons to guard them. A policy that has proven fruitful for Antigonid armies in Greece, where Demetrius is currently removing garrison after garrison of Macedonian troops. At our start Phrygia has a large number of subject states all over Anatolia and to some extent in Greece. It is also hated by all the other big successor empires such as Macedon, Thrace, Egypt and the Seleucid Empire.
  • Bithynia: Small kingdom by the Black Sea and the Bosporus ruled by the local dynast Zipoetes. Independent since the death of Alexander the great, Bithynia has had to successfully defend itself from both Lysimachos in Thrace and Antigonus in Phrygia. In 304 BC Bithynia has attempted multiple times to annex the nearby city states of Calchedon and Astakos, due to the intervention of their more powerful neighbors. Should these big states be distracted, Zipoetes is likely to try again.
  • Heraclea Pontica: Small kingdom by the Black Sea ruled by Amastris, widow of the Tyrant Dionysios, former wife of the Diadochi Craterus and niece of the Persian Emperor Darius III. Heraclea is a small kingdom with many enemies and needs to pursue very active foreign and domestic policies. Like many of the Diadochi, Amastris has founded a new capital in her own name, Amastris, moving the population of other nearby cities into one place. Heraclea Pontica starts the game as an unaligned kingdom without allies.
  • Paphlagonia: Tribal Kingdom in north western anatolia representing the general lack of authority in the area after the spotlight of the Diadochi wars had moved on. Starts the game unaligned and without allies.
  • Kios: Small kingdom near the Bosporus, tributary of Phrygia. Most all known for its ruler, Mithridates, who is the descendant of the Persian Satraps of Pontus. Kios is nominally subject to the Antigonids and while Mithridates and Antigonus do not trust each other their sons have grown to be friends. Historically Antigonus would invade and execute Mithridates, while his son, also named Mithridates, would escape and eventually found a new kingdom in Pontus. Kios starts as a Tributary of Phrygia.
  • Kyzikos: Small plutocratic republic midway between the openings in to the sea of Marmara. Kyzikos starts as a feudatory of Phrygia.
  • Byzantion: Small city state on the western side of the Bosporus. Its position allows it to control the shipping in and out of the Black Sea. Byzantion is constantly under threat from the much stronger nearby kingdom of Thrace, under the Diadochos Lysimachos, but has so far been able to assert its independence, rebuffing any threats for tribute.
  • Chalcedon: Very old and influential republic on the eastern side of the Bosporus. Supposedly called “the city of the blind” due to its founders ignoring the site of the future Byzantion. Another nearby city state, and frequent ally. Calchedon is constantly threatened by the nearby kingdom of Bithynia, and its ambitious king Zipoetes, but have on several occasions been saved by the armies of the Antigonids. At start Calchedon is independent and unaligned.
Cappadocia, Pontus & the Black Sea Coast
pontus.png
The Anatolian region has been one of many theaters in the ongoing wars of the Diadochi, and has seen the rise and fall of many of Alexander’s generals. These decades of warfare has left the more peripheral places like Pontus and Armenia almost entirely out of reach from the greek successors. Cappadocia, historically often autonomous, has been central to some of the recent wars and is currently under the control of the Antigonid Satrap Amyntas.

Starting Countries:
pontuspolitical.png
  • Pontus: Tribal kingdom representing the local dynasts in northern Pontus. Like Paphlagonia Pontus has not been the primary scene for any of the fighting in the wars of the Diadochi for quite a while. Historically the former Persian Satraps of Pontus, now kings of Kios, would return to found the Mithridatic kingdom of Pontus not many years after our start in 304 BC.
  • Cappadocia: Feudatory kingdom under Satrap Amyntas, in central Anatolia. While the rulers are Macedonian, Cappadocia remains a firmly Anatolian region with little in the way of Greek population. The former Persian Satraps of the region remain in the court of the nearby kingdom of Armenia and would want nothing more than to return to depose Amyntas. In 304 BC Cappadocia is a Satrapy under Phrygia.
  • Trapezous: Independent Oligarchic Republic on the coast of the Black Sea. Surrounded by the tribal southern areas of Colchis in the east and the Greek coastal parts of Pontus in the west. A major entrepot for Greek traders all over the Pontic coast, eastern Anatolia and the Caucasus.
  • Sinope: Independent Graeco-Pontic city state ruled by the Paphlagonian Tyrant Scydrothemis on the border of Paphlagonia and Pontus. Founded by Greek settlers hundreds of years ago, Sinope lives on its overseas trade and good relations with the city state of Byzantion on the Bosporus. As one of the oldest Graeco-Pontic cities, Sinope has been the point of origin for many of the colonists who founded other Greek cities along the Pontic coast. Sinope starts as an independent Despotic Kingdom.
  • Amisos: Independent Greek plutocratic republic on the Pontic coast. While Amisos is not as rich and influential of Sinope it is a strong little merchant state. Amisos is independent and unaligned at the start of the game.
  • Kerausous: Small City state on the Pontic coast. Founded as a colony of Sinope. Kerasous starts as a Feudatory of Sinope.
  • Kotyora: Small City state on the Pontic coast. Founded as a colony of Sinope. Kotyora starts as a Feudatory of Sinope.
 

Attachments

Last edited:
  • 1
  • 1Like
Reactions:

Palando

Barrington Celticus
42 Badges
Feb 23, 2017
1.127
48
  • Crusader Kings II
  • Europa Universalis IV: Third Rome
  • Europa Universalis IV: Res Publica
  • Europa Universalis IV: Wealth of Nations
  • Europa Universalis IV: Conquest of Paradise
  • Europa Universalis IV: Art of War
  • Crusader Kings II: Jade Dragon
  • Europa Universalis IV: Rule Britannia
  • Crusader Kings II: Conclave
  • Crusader Kings II: Reapers Due
  • Europa Universalis IV: Rights of Man
  • Crusader Kings II: Monks and Mystics
  • Europa Universalis IV: Mandate of Heaven
  • Age of Wonders III
  • Europa Universalis IV: Cradle of Civilization
  • Imperator: Rome
  • Imperator: Rome Sign Up
  • Imperator: Rome - Magna Graecia
  • Cities: Skylines - Parklife Pre-Order
  • Cities: Skylines - Parklife
  • Europa Universalis IV: Dharma
  • Crusader Kings II: Holy Fury
  • Crusader Kings II: Horse Lords
  • Europa Universalis IV: Common Sense
  • Crusader Kings II: Way of Life
  • Europa Universalis IV: Cossacks
  • Europa Universalis IV: El Dorado
  • Cities: Skylines
  • Victoria 2
  • Europa Universalis IV: Mare Nostrum
  • Crusader Kings II: Charlemagne
  • Crusader Kings II: Legacy of Rome
  • Crusader Kings II: The Old Gods
  • Crusader Kings II: Rajas of India
  • Crusader Kings II: The Republic
  • Crusader Kings II: Sons of Abraham
  • Crusader Kings II: Sword of Islam
  • Victoria: Revolutions
  • Victoria 2: A House Divided
  • Victoria 2: Heart of Darkness
  • Europa Universalis IV: Pre-order
How moddable are religions? Would it be possible to mod in a religion with a religious head (e.g. Catholicism/Christianity)?
 

cristofolmc

Field Marshal
32 Badges
Mar 5, 2009
2.623
296
  • Europa Universalis III
  • Europa Universalis III: Chronicles
  • Europa Universalis III Complete
  • Divine Wind
  • Heir to the Throne
  • Crusader Kings II
  • Rome Gold
  • Imperator: Rome Sign Up
  • Crusader Kings III
  • Europa Universalis 4: Emperor
  • Imperator: Rome
  • Europa Universalis IV: Cradle of Civilization
  • Age of Wonders III
  • Europa Universalis IV: Mandate of Heaven
  • Europa Universalis IV: Rights of Man
  • Hearts of Iron IV Sign-up
  • Europa Universalis IV: Cossacks
  • Europa Universalis IV: Common Sense
  • 500k Club
  • Victoria 2
  • Europa Universalis III Complete
  • Europa Universalis III Complete
  • Victoria 2: A House Divided
  • Crusader Kings II: Sword of Islam
  • Crusader Kings II: Sons of Abraham
  • Crusader Kings II: The Old Gods
Nice one! Are there mechanical differences between religions? Or just flavour names? I dont expect judaism to work the same way the Hellenic-Roman religion based on sacrifices do! Will you talk about it in further DDiaries?
 

jumbi

Elder Councillor & Servant of the Masters
92 Badges
May 18, 2013
586
795
  • Stellaris: Galaxy Edition
  • Victoria 2: A House Divided
  • Victoria 2: Heart of Darkness
  • Europa Universalis IV: Pre-order
  • Cities: Skylines - After Dark
  • Europa Universalis IV: Cossacks
  • Cities: Skylines - Snowfall
  • Europa Universalis IV: Mare Nostrum
  • Stellaris
  • A Game of Dwarves
  • Stellaris: Galaxy Edition
  • Steel Division: Normand 44 - Second Wave
  • Europa Universalis IV: Rights of Man
  • Tyranny: Archon Edition
  • Tyranny: Archon Edition
  • Crusader Kings II: Monks and Mystics
  • Stellaris - Path to Destruction bundle
  • Crusader Kings II: Sons of Abraham
  • Age of Wonders III
  • Crusader Kings II: Sunset Invasion
  • Crusader Kings II: Sword of Islam
  • Europa Universalis IV: Art of War
  • Crusader Kings II: Legacy of Rome
  • Europa Universalis IV: Conquest of Paradise
  • Europa Universalis IV: Wealth of Nations
  • Crusader Kings II: Charlemagne
  • Crusader Kings II: The Republic
  • Crusader Kings II: The Old Gods
  • Stellaris: Synthetic Dawn
  • Crusader Kings II: Rajas of India
  • Crusader Kings II
  • Magicka
  • Europa Universalis IV: Res Publica
  • Crusader Kings II: Reapers Due
  • Stellaris: Galaxy Edition
  • Tyranny: Gold Edition
  • Stellaris: Digital Anniversary Edition
  • Stellaris: Leviathans Story Pack
  • Cities: Skylines - Natural Disasters
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Field Marshal
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Colonel
  • Stellaris Sign-up
  • Crusader Kings II: Conclave
  • Crusader Kings II: Horse Lords
  • Europa Universalis IV: Common Sense
  • Pillars of Eternity
  • Crusader Kings II: Way of Life
  • Europa Universalis IV: El Dorado
  • Cities: Skylines
A Greek country following the Hellenic faith will for instance seek the Blessings of Ares, Athena, or Fortuna.
Should Greeks not seek the blessing of Tyche, not Fortuna?
 

Nattack

Sergeant
19 Badges
Sep 6, 2017
92
0
  • Crusader Kings II
  • Rome: Vae Victis
  • Victoria 2: Heart of Darkness
  • Victoria 2: A House Divided
  • Rome Gold
  • Imperator: Rome Sign Up
  • Imperator: Rome
  • Crusader Kings II: Monks and Mystics
  • Stellaris
  • Crusader Kings II: Horse Lords
  • Crusader Kings II: Way of Life
  • Victoria 2
  • Crusader Kings II: Sword of Islam
  • Crusader Kings II: Sons of Abraham
  • Crusader Kings II: The Republic
  • Crusader Kings II: The Old Gods
  • Crusader Kings II: Legacy of Rome
  • Europa Universalis IV: Wealth of Nations
Doesn't say what the dev diary next week will be about. Is it going to be a suprise?
I'm so happy that omens don't have negative effects anymore.
 

Denkt

Left the forums permamently
42 Badges
May 28, 2010
15.763
6.344
Will not Phrygia get over the diplomatic limit penalty with so many feudatories?

It also seems a bit strange that there is both a tax and Commerce omen as the Point of both tax and Commerce is to get Money and two choices mean some math needs to be done to know which one would make more Money.

What do the columns mean on the map?
 

Orimichi

Sergeant
33 Badges
Jan 13, 2018
87
0
  • BATTLETECH
  • Imperator: Rome Deluxe Edition
  • Stellaris: Megacorp
  • Surviving Mars: First Colony Edition
  • Stellaris: Distant Stars
  • Cities: Skylines - Parklife
  • Cities: Skylines - Parklife Pre-Order
  • Surviving Mars: Digital Deluxe Edition
  • Stellaris: Apocalypse
  • Stellaris: Humanoids Species Pack
  • Cities: Skylines - Green Cities
  • Age of Wonders III
  • Surviving Mars
  • Stellaris - Path to Destruction bundle
  • Crusader Kings II: Monks and Mystics
  • Stellaris: Leviathans Story Pack
  • Stellaris: Digital Anniversary Edition
  • Stellaris
  • Crusader Kings II: Conclave
  • Pillars of Eternity
  • Cities: Skylines
  • Victoria 2
  • Prison Architect
  • Surviving Mars: First Colony Edition
  • Imperator: Rome Sign Up
  • Stellaris: Synthetic Dawn
  • Imperator: Rome
  • Stellaris: Ancient Relics
  • Crusader Kings II
  • Crusader Kings II: Sons of Abraham
  • Crusader Kings II: The Republic
  • Crusader Kings II: The Old Gods
  • Crusader Kings II: Legacy of Rome
Does the different religion have different gameplay, or just the name of the god's blessing change?
 

Adrianople

Second Lieutenant
68 Badges
Feb 24, 2015
173
105
  • Europa Universalis IV: Golden Century
  • Europa Universalis IV: Common Sense
  • Crusader Kings II: Horse Lords
  • Europa Universalis IV: Cossacks
  • Crusader Kings II: Conclave
  • Stellaris
  • Stellaris: Galaxy Edition
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Expansion Pass
  • Hearts of Iron IV Sign-up
  • Crusader Kings II: Way of Life
  • Crusader Kings II: Reapers Due
  • Europa Universalis IV: Rights of Man
  • Stellaris: Digital Anniversary Edition
  • Stellaris: Leviathans Story Pack
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Together for Victory
  • Crusader Kings II: Monks and Mystics
  • Crusader Kings II: Jade Dragon
  • Europa Universalis IV: Mandate of Heaven
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Death or Dishonor
  • Imperator: Rome Sign Up
  • Crusader Kings II: Holy Fury
  • Imperator: Rome Deluxe Edition
  • Europa Universalis IV: Dharma
  • Stellaris: Distant Stars
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Expansion Pass
  • Europa Universalis IV: Rule Britannia
  • Europa Universalis 4: Emperor
  • Battle for Bosporus
  • Crusader Kings III: Royal Edition
  • Stellaris: Ancient Relics
  • Stellaris: Lithoids
  • Hearts of Iron IV: La Resistance
  • Imperator: Rome - Magna Graecia
  • Victoria 2
  • Crusader Kings III
  • Stellaris: Apocalypse
  • Europa Universalis IV: El Dorado
  • Stellaris: Humanoids Species Pack
  • Europa Universalis IV: Mare Nostrum
  • Stellaris: Galaxy Edition
  • Stellaris - Path to Destruction bundle
  • Europa Universalis IV: Third Rome
  • Europa Universalis IV: Pre-order
  • Victoria 2: Heart of Darkness
  • Crusader Kings II
  • Crusader Kings II: Charlemagne
  • Crusader Kings II: Legacy of Rome
  • Crusader Kings II: The Old Gods
  • Crusader Kings II: Rajas of India
Byzantine Playthrough is now a definite
 

Zukhani

First Lieutenant
16 Badges
Jan 26, 2018
231
54
  • Crusader Kings II
  • Crusader Kings II: The Old Gods
  • Darkest Hour
  • Europa Universalis III
  • Divine Wind
  • Heir to the Throne
  • Europa Universalis III: Collection
  • Magicka 2
  • Stellaris
  • Age of Wonders III
  • Prison Architect
  • Imperator: Rome Sign Up
  • Crusader Kings III Referal
  • Crusader Kings III
  • Crusader Kings III: Royal Edition
Kios in Western Anatolian section is not in bold like other countries.
 

Nyrael

Field Marshal
79 Badges
Jul 20, 2008
5.698
4.100
30
  • Europa Universalis IV: Mare Nostrum
  • Europa Universalis IV: Pre-order
  • Europa Universalis IV: Cossacks
  • Stellaris: Distant Stars
  • Victoria 2
  • Europa Universalis 4: Emperor
  • Warlock 2: The Exiled
  • 500k Club
  • Europa Universalis IV: El Dorado
  • Crusader Kings II: Way of Life
  • Pillars of Eternity
  • Europa Universalis IV: Common Sense
  • Crusader Kings II: Horse Lords
  • Europa Universalis IV: Rule Britannia
  • Crusader Kings II: Conclave
  • Stellaris
  • Stellaris Sign-up
  • Crusader Kings II: Reapers Due
  • Europa Universalis IV: Rights of Man
  • Tyranny: Archon Edition
  • Tyranny: Archon Edition
  • Stellaris: Digital Anniversary Edition
  • Stellaris: Leviathans Story Pack
  • Crusader Kings II: Monks and Mystics
  • Shadowrun Returns
  • Stellaris - Path to Destruction bundle
  • Shadowrun: Dragonfall
  • Shadowrun: Hong Kong
  • Stellaris: Megacorp
  • Crusader Kings II: Holy Fury
  • Europa Universalis IV: Golden Century
  • Imperator: Rome Deluxe Edition
  • Imperator: Rome Sign Up
  • Stellaris: Ancient Relics
  • Stellaris: Lithoids
  • Imperator: Rome - Magna Graecia
  • Crusader Kings III
  • Stellaris: Apocalypse
  • Europa Universalis IV: Dharma
  • Europa Universalis IV: Mandate of Heaven
  • Tyranny - Bastards Wound
  • Age of Wonders III
  • Europa Universalis III Complete
  • Europa Universalis IV: Cradle of Civilization
  • Europa Universalis III Complete
  • Stellaris: Humanoids Species Pack
  • Stellaris: Synthetic Dawn
  • Europa Universalis IV: Third Rome
  • Rome: Vae Victis
Does the different religion have different gameplay, or just the name of the god's blessing change?
No different gameplay, just flavor (with possible exception of Buddhists it seems, which is a spreading faith in India). As said before the game's announcement: religion is there, but it isn't a very important gameplay element. I don't think that the DLC will change this either, unless the Devs really expand the period and Christianity (and other religions fighting to replace Hellenism) appears.
 

Cephei80

Captain
23 Badges
Jan 22, 2016
462
66
  • Crusader Kings II: Conclave
  • Crusader Kings III Referal
  • Imperator: Rome Sign Up
  • Crusader Kings II: Holy Fury
  • Shadowrun: Hong Kong
  • Crusader Kings II: Jade Dragon
  • Age of Wonders III
  • Crusader Kings II: Monks and Mystics
  • Crusader Kings II: Reapers Due
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Cadet
  • Stellaris Sign-up
  • Stellaris
  • Crusader Kings II: Horse Lords
  • Crusader Kings II: Way of Life
  • Crusader Kings II
  • Crusader Kings II: Sword of Islam
  • Crusader Kings II: Sunset Invasion
  • Crusader Kings II: Sons of Abraham
  • Crusader Kings II: The Republic
  • Crusader Kings II: Rajas of India
  • Crusader Kings II: The Old Gods
  • Crusader Kings II: Legacy of Rome
  • Crusader Kings II: Charlemagne
Hello again!

Today I am here, somewhat belatedly, to talk about the how religion works in the game, as well as the starting setup in Anatolia and the Aegean. :)

Religion
In the ancient world religion was not quite as important as in the periods covered by some of our other games, like the age of reformation in Europa Universalis or the Crusades in Crusader Kings. That does not mean however that religion was inconsequential in the ancient world. While syncretism was common there was also great variety in the many pantheons of the era and things like the cult of Fortune and worship Serapis in some ways transcended the different religious spheres. In Imperator each Country, Character and Pop will belong to one of the 22 religions in the game. These will be the source of flavor but also of some direct gameplay effects:

  • Perhaps most importantly pops that are of another religion to your country will not be as happy or productive under your rule.
  • Characters of another religion to your country will have a lower maximum loyalty to the state.
  • Pops ruled by a governor of their own religion will be happier and more productive, while the happiness of pops under a governor of a foreign religion will be less happy and more prone to unrest.
  • Religion does not modify opinion between countries but in diplomacy a country of another religion will be somewhat less likely to accept your proposals.
  • Characters of the wrong religion are also less likely to be elected for office in a Republic.



In addition you can spend religious power to invoke Omens, to Sacrifice to the Gods and increase stability and on Invoking Devotio to reduce War Exhaustion.

Each country is able to invoke an Omen for a price of Religious Power (currently 200 as base). The power and the length of an Omen can be modified by things like ideas, government officials, events, laws and many other things. Unlike in Europa Universalis:Rome an Omen can never directly fail - giving you a negative effect.

The name and description of the Omens depends on your religion and culture. A Greek country following the Hellenic faith will for instance seek the Blessings of Ares, Athena, or Tyche. While a Roman one will instead turn to Mars, Minerva or Fortuna. This is also reflected in events and text that reference the gods (and of course in the variety of events available).

View attachment 417072

Pop religion can change either by direct intervention of the state, using religious power, or through the use of the religious conversion governor policy.
Characters will generally not change their religion but may do so on their own accord through events, especially if they are ambitious and wanting to pursue a career in the service of the state. You can also demand that your characters change their religion directly, though they may not necessarily appreciate that.

In India Buddhism is a still young and spreading religion which will be reflected in a tendency for characters and pops there to switch to it through events.

The religions currently in the game are:
  • Hellenic: Having spread from the Greek heartland, the Olympian pantheon is venerated by many. The names, aspects and hierarchy of many of the gods can vary widely from region to region, however, Zeus, or Jupiter as he is known to the Romans, is regarded as the figurehead of the Olympian pantheon.
  • Kemetic: The history of the indigenous Egyptian religion stretches back many thousands of years. Manifesting as a polytheistic faith, the worship of Ra, Atum, Sekhmet and others, displays a deep reverence for the fundamental aspects of the natural world.
  • Canaanite: The Canaanite religion venerates a number of Gods and their aspects, in a polytheistic manner. Baal is regarded as the chief deity in a complex hierarchy of lesser gods, which were often worshipped at shrines found on mountains or hilltops. At the start of the game the Canaanite religion is primarily found in Phoenicia and Phoenician colonies, such as Carthage.
  • Zalmoxian: Whether Zalmoxis was originally a prophet or a god, is unknown. The Dacians and Getae however, revere Zalmoxis as a divine being, ascribing many miraculous acts to him.
  • Druidic: Druids acted for the Celts, as a distinct social class. Often acting as magistrates and lawmakers, they also dictated local religious customs and beliefs. Druidic faiths are primarily found in Iberia, Gaul and the British Isles at the start of the game.
  • Iberic: Essentially a hybrid polytheistic religion, Iberian religious practices involve the veneration of animal spirits, as well as ancestor worship. Various Hellenic and Phoenician gods were worshipped by the Iberians, as well as local deities such as Betatun or Ataecina.
  • Jewish: Unusually amongst contemporary faiths, Judaism is a monotheistic religion. Following a series of prophets and teachers, the Jewish holy book, the Torah, contains the details of a covenant created between God and the children of Israel.
  • Zoroastrian: The prophet Zoroaster taught of a monotheistic faith in the Creator-God Ahuramazda. Evolving out of early Indo-Iranian polytheism, great reverence is shown for the 'eternal law', or, Daena, which espouses good and righteous conduct.
  • Matrist: Little is known of the Baltic tribes and their religion. Nonetheless, records survive, telling of cults worshipping a mother goddess, along the baltic coast.
  • North African: The ancient culture and religion was a melting pot of traditional egyptian beliefs, star-worship, and ancestor veneration. Many megaliths - stone constructs raised in honor of the gods - still exist, dotted about the African landscape.
  • Tuistic: The ancient Germanic god for Tius, Teiws, or Tuisto, was worshipped by the early migratory tribes from modern-day Scandinavia. Many accounts suggest that the Germanic people practiced a largely animist religion, venerating the earth and sky, and the life force of all living things.
  • Arabic: Religion in Arabia was a polytheistic mixture of deities, aspects and demons, practiced in localities and enclaves around the region. Allah, the Creator-God, may have been worshipped as the head of the pantheon during this period, in some locations.
  • Ritualist: Representing a variety of localized faiths and folk religions, Ritualism espouses ancestor-worship, animism, and votive offerings
  • Buddhist: A relatively young religion, Buddhism arose in Northern India, following the life of Siddhartha Gautama, or simply, Buddha. The Buddha was an ascetic teacher, who spoke of the Middle Way, throughout India.
  • Hindu: Hinduism evolved out of the Vedic period, shepherded by the creation of the Upanishads, and was widely followed throughout India during early antiquity.
  • Bön: Bön represents a collection of folk religions originally practiced on the Tibetan plateau. Aspects of ancestor worship and animism appear frequently, as well as nascent polytheism.
  • Heptadic: Originating in Scythian lands, this pantheistic faith worshipped seven principal gods, often equated to those of the Greek pantheon. Elements of the earlier polytheistic folk religion of the scythians still remains, as does the practice of horse sacrifice and chariot burials, similar to those of the Celts.
  • Cybelene: The Phrygian cult of Cybele is linked to prehistoric Mother-Goddess worship. Evolving over thousands of years, the cult of Cybele often claimed relationship to mythical figures and heroes, and practiced their religion with the veneration of idols.
  • Khaldic: The Khaldic pantheon represents a religion which grew out of the Urartian culture, many centuries before. A principally polytheistic faith, the chief god was known as Khaldi, and was worshipped as a warrior god.
  • Armazic: Possibly connected to the nearby Anatolian religions, the pantheon of the Caucasian-Iberia region was ruled over by the god Armaz.
  • Chaldean: The history of the Chaldean pantheon stretches back many thousands of years. Worshipping gods such as Anu, Enki and Nanna, the devotees of the Chaldean religion construct imposing temples in honor of their chosen God.


Anatolia in 450 AUC / 304 BCE
View attachment 417073


The Aegean and the Ionian Coast
View attachment 417080
In 304 BC the well populated parts of Anatolia is almost entirely dominated by the empire of Antigonus, former Satrap of Phrygia. Settled by Greeks centuries ago the Anatolian coastline has a number of rich cities that are in most ways an integral part of the Greek world. Antigonus policy towards the greek cities has been of relative benevolence and autonomy. The cities have not generally been garrisoned, instead they have been organized in Koines or city leagues, hearkening back to the old leagues that existed in the region before its conquest by Persia and later Alexander the Great.

Local adversaries of the Antigonids in the near time has been both Cassander and Ptolemy. The later a long term ally of many of the island countries of the Aegean. The recent Battle of Salamis has however has seen the Ptolemaic fleet crushed and resulted in almost total Antigonid hegemony among the islands, with the notable exceptions of Rhodes and Kos.

Anatolia is also the starting point of the old Persian Royal Road, which still connects the region with the Syria, Mesopotamia and beyond.

Starting Countries:
View attachment 417079
  • Aeolia: Republic representing the cities of the Aeolian League, or League of Ilion. While a league of Aeolian cities has existed on and off for hundreds of years, this particular one has been re-enacted as part of Antigonus policy to safeguard the rights of the free Greek cities. Starts as a feudatory of Phrygia.
  • Ionia: Republic presenting the cities of the Ionian League. Like Aeolia this league has been recreated when the cities came under Antigonid control. It is led by the Antigonid lieutenant Hipparchos of Cyrene. Starts as a Feudatory of Phrygia.
  • Miletos: Republic on the Anatolian coast. Once a powerful city and the point of origin for many of the Greek colonists who have settled along the Black Sea Coast. Miletos was freed by Antigonus early in the wars of the successors and at start enjoys its freedom relatively undisturbed. Miletos starts as an independent city.
  • Kos: Small island Republic that was perhaps most known for being one of the few places to produce mediterranean silk, and for its medical school, said to have been founded by Hippokrates. Kos is a long term ally of the Ptolemies in Egypt but with the withdrawal of all Ptolemaic forces after the battle of Salamis they now stand alone. In 304 BCE Kos was, and would continue to be, a major center of culture. This is the home of a number of interesting characters, both in medicine, such as Proxagoras, as well as poets and scholars as Berosus, Philitas, Herodas, many of whom would eventually find their way to Ptolemaic Alexandria. Kos starts as a Feudatory of Egypt.
  • Nesiotic League: The nesiotic league, or league of the islanders, has been created by the Antigonids to organize the many islands of the Aegean. While they may seem peripheral these islands are the source of many goods that are highly sought after in the greater mediterranean world. Glass, silk, marble, precious and base metals can all be extracted from these islands. It’s capital is the sacred city of Delos.
  • Halikarnassos: An old colony of Troizen in the agean the port of Halikarnassos remains an independent city. In his recent excursion into the region Ptolemy attempted to seize it by force, but was repelled by Demetrius Poliorcetes. Halikarnassos starts as a feudatory of Phrygia.
  • Andros: Small island nation between Euboea and the Nesiotic league, aligned with the Ptolemids in Egypt. Andros starts as a feudatory of Egypt.
  • Knidos: Small city state in coastal Caria. Would become known for its medical school, though it was not as famous or influential as that of nearby Kos. Knidos starts as a Feudatory of Phrygia.
  • Rhodes: Island Republic known for its highly praised workshops, shipyards and for some of the toughest fortifications in the Mediterranean. Like Kos the Rhodian state is a friend of the Ptolemids, but after the battle of Salamis these are not a present factor in the Aegean. Rhodes itself has recently withstood a spectacular year long siege by Antigonus son, Demetrius. Despite employing considerable resources and technical innovations the Demetrius failed to take the city, earning himself the nickname Poliorcetes, “the besieger” in the process. Rhodes would in time rise to become a considerable center of production and a respectable naval power, as well a close ally of the Ptolemies. Famously the Rhodians would use the many siege machines left behind by Demetrius to create a monument over their victory in the form of a giant Colossus, later named as one of the wonders of the ancient world. Rhodos starts independent and has a decision available to it to construct the colossus to commemorate its recent siege.
View attachment 417081

Western Anatolia: The Hellespont, Phrygia & Paphlagonia
View attachment 417078
While central Anatolia has been involved in a number of campaigns of the successors, and is now firmly under the control of the Antigonids, the north western coast is home to a number of small states of increasing autonomy. As elsewhere the Antigonid policy has been to maintain the freedom of Greek cities, with cities such as Astakos, Kios and Calchedon and Byzantium enjoying the protection of the larger Phrygian realm. This has so far thwarted the attempts of local dynasts such as Zipoetes in Bithynia, Dionysius in Heraclea Pontica or even the massive Thracian realm of Lysimachos.

Should the Antigonid realm, Phrygia in our game, fail the days of these small cities may well be numbered however.

Starting Countries:
View attachment 417077
  • Phrygia: The realm of Antigonus “the one-eyed” Monophthalmus and Demetrius “the besieger” Poliorketes. Phrygia is in many ways the most successful of the Successor kingdoms at this date. Even if Antigonus himself is a very old man by now he has consistently beaten the armies of the other successors and come closer than anyone else to reforming Alexander’s empire. In 304 BCE the Antigonid realm has enemies in all the great powers of the Hellenistic world, but still enjoys a very favorable reputation among the many Greek cities of the Mediterranean. Unlike his opposition Antigonus is known for protecting their freedom and not leaving his own garrisons to guard them. A policy that has proven fruitful for Antigonid armies in Greece, where Demetrius is currently removing garrison after garrison of Macedonian troops. At our start Phrygia has a large number of subject states all over Anatolia and to some extent in Greece. It is also hated by all the other big successor empires such as Macedon, Thrace, Egypt and the Seleucid Empire.
  • Bithynia: Small kingdom by the Black Sea and the Bosporus ruled by the local dynast Zipoetes. Independent since the death of Alexander the great, Bithynia has had to successfully defend itself from both Lysimachos in Thrace and Antigonus in Phrygia. In 304 BC Bithynia has attempted multiple times to annex the nearby city states of Calchedon and Astakos, due to the intervention of their more powerful neighbors. Should these big states be distracted, Zipoetes is likely to try again.
  • Heraclea Pontica: Small kingdom by the Black Sea ruled by Amastris, widow of the Tyrant Dionysios, former wife of the Diadochi Craterus and niece of the Persian Emperor Darius III. Heraclea is a small kingdom with many enemies and needs to pursue very active foreign and domestic policies. Like many of the Diadochi, Amastris has founded a new capital in her own name, Amastris, moving the population of other nearby cities into one place. Heraclea Pontica starts the game as an unaligned kingdom without allies.
  • Paphlagonia: Tribal Kingdom in north western anatolia representing the general lack of authority in the area after the spotlight of the Diadochi wars had moved on. Starts the game unaligned and without allies.
  • Kios: Small kingdom near the Bosporus, tributary of Phrygia. Most all known for its ruler, Mithridates, who is the descendant of the Persian Satraps of Pontus. Kios is nominally subject to the Antigonids and while Mithridates and Antigonus do not trust each other their sons have grown to be friends. Historically Antigonus would invade and execute Mithridates, while his son, also named Mithridates, would escape and eventually found a new kingdom in Pontus. Kios starts as a Tributary of Phrygia.
  • Kyzikos: Small plutocratic republic midway between the openings in to the sea of Marmara. Kyzikos starts as a feudatory of Phrygia.
  • Byzantion: Small city state on the western side of the Bosporus. Its position allows it to control the shipping in and out of the Black Sea. Byzantion is constantly under threat from the much stronger nearby kingdom of Thrace, under the Diadochos Lysimachos, but has so far been able to assert its independence, rebuffing any threats for tribute.
  • Calchedon: Very old and influential republic on the eastern side of the Bosporus. Supposedly called “the city of the blind” due to its founders ignoring the site of the future Byzantion. Another nearby city state, and frequent ally. Calchedon is constantly threatened by the nearby kingdom of Bithynia, and its ambitious king Zipoetes, but have on several occasions been saved by the armies of the Antigonids. At start Calchedon is independent and unaligned.
Cappadocia, Pontus & the Black Sea Coast
View attachment 417076
The Anatolian region has been one of many theaters in the ongoing wars of the Diadochi, and has seen the rise and fall of many of Alexander’s generals. These decades of warfare has left the more peripheral places like Pontus and Armenia almost entirely out of reach from the greek successors. Cappadocia, historically often autonomous, has been central to some of the recent wars and is currently under the control of the Antigonid Satrap Amyntas.

Starting Countries:
View attachment 417075
  • Pontus: Tribal kingdom representing the local dynasts in northern Pontus. Like Paphlagonia Pontus has not been the primary scene for any of the fighting in the wars of the Diadochi for quite a while. Historically the former Persian Satraps of Pontus, now kings of Kios, would return to found the Mithridatic kingdom of Pontus not many years after our start in 304 BC.
  • Cappadocia: Feudatory kingdom under Satrap Amyntas, in central Anatolia. While the rulers are Macedonian, Cappadocia remains a firmly Anatolian region with little in the way of Greek population. The former Persian Satraps of the region remain in the court of the nearby kingdom of Armenia and would want nothing more than to return to depose Amyntas. In 304 BC Cappadocia is a Satrapy under Phrygia.
  • Trapezous: Independent Oligarchic Republic on the coast of the Black Sea. Surrounded by the tribal southern areas of Colchis in the east and the Greek coastal parts of Pontus in the west. A major entrepot for Greek traders all over the Pontic coast, eastern Anatolia and the Caucasus.
  • Sinope: Independent Graeco-Pontic city state ruled by the Paphlagonian Tyrant Scydrothemis on the border of Paphlagonia and Pontus. Founded by Greek settlers hundreds of years ago, Sinope lives on its overseas trade and good relations with the city state of Byzantion on the Bosporus. As one of the oldest Graeco-Pontic cities, Sinope has been the point of origin for many of the colonists who founded other Greek cities along the Pontic coast. Sinope starts as an independent Despotic Kingdom.
  • Amisos: Independent Greek plutocratic republic on the Pontic coast. While Amisos is not as rich and influential of Sinope it is a strong little merchant state. Amisos is independent and unaligned at the start of the game.
  • Kerausous: Small City state on the Pontic coast. Founded as a colony of Sinope. Kerasous starts as a Feudatory of Sinope.
  • Kotyora: Small City state on the Pontic coast. Founded as a colony of Sinope. Kotyora starts as a Feudatory of Sinope.
i see now why you take so long to post a dev diary , thank you for all the time you waste writing all of this , it must be a real pain for you .
 

Locklen

Second Lieutenant
73 Badges
Feb 17, 2013
144
27
  • Crusader Kings II
  • Europa Universalis IV: Third Rome
  • Crusader Kings II: Jade Dragon
  • Stellaris - Path to Destruction bundle
  • Crusader Kings II: Monks and Mystics
  • Crusader Kings II: Reapers Due
  • Stellaris: Galaxy Edition
  • Europa Universalis IV: Mare Nostrum
  • Rome: Vae Victis
  • Victoria 2: Heart of Darkness
  • Victoria 2: A House Divided
  • Rome Gold
  • Victoria: Revolutions
  • Europa Universalis IV: Res Publica
  • Magicka
  • Heir to the Throne
  • Europa Universalis IV: Conquest of Paradise
  • Crusader Kings II: Charlemagne
  • Crusader Kings II: Legacy of Rome
  • Crusader Kings II: The Old Gods
  • Crusader Kings II: Rajas of India
  • Crusader Kings II: The Republic
  • Crusader Kings II: Sons of Abraham
  • Crusader Kings II: Sunset Invasion
  • Europa Universalis IV: Wealth of Nations
  • Europa Universalis IV: Art of War
  • Divine Wind
  • Europa Universalis III
  • Europa Universalis III: Chronicles
  • Crusader Kings II: Sword of Islam
  • Hearts of Iron IV Sign-up
  • Europa Universalis IV: Mandate of Heaven
  • Stellaris: Leviathans Story Pack
  • Europa Universalis 4: Emperor
  • Europa Universalis IV: Rights of Man
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Field Marshal
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Colonel
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Cadet
  • Stellaris Sign-up
  • Victoria 2
  • Stellaris: Galaxy Edition
  • Stellaris
  • Crusader Kings II: Conclave
  • Europa Universalis IV: Cossacks
  • Crusader Kings II: Horse Lords
  • Europa Universalis IV: Common Sense
  • Pillars of Eternity
  • Crusader Kings II: Way of Life
  • Europa Universalis IV: El Dorado
How will the blessing and omen system work for monotheistic religions, seeing as they have but 1 deity to pray to?

Also, you didn't tell us the requirements to form Byzantium :)
 

Khannis

Second Lieutenant
72 Badges
Nov 14, 2013
172
42
  • Hearts of Iron III
  • Europa Universalis IV: Third Rome
  • Europa Universalis IV: Mare Nostrum
  • Stellaris: Galaxy Edition
  • Hearts of Iron IV Sign-up
  • Stellaris - Path to Destruction bundle
  • Europa Universalis IV: Pre-order
  • Semper Fi
  • Europa Universalis IV: Res Publica
  • Hearts of Iron III: Their Finest Hour
  • For the Motherland
  • Europa Universalis IV: Wealth of Nations
  • Europa Universalis IV: Conquest of Paradise
  • Europa Universalis IV: Art of War
  • Crusader Kings II: Sword of Islam
  • Crusader Kings II: Sunset Invasion
  • Crusader Kings II: Sons of Abraham
  • Crusader Kings II: The Republic
  • Crusader Kings II: Rajas of India
  • Crusader Kings II: The Old Gods
  • Crusader Kings II: Legacy of Rome
  • Crusader Kings II: Charlemagne
  • Crusader Kings II
  • Stellaris: Leviathans Story Pack
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Expansion Pass
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Together for Victory
  • Crusader Kings II: Monks and Mystics
  • Europa Universalis IV: Mandate of Heaven
  • BATTLETECH
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Death or Dishonor
  • Europa Universalis 4: Emperor
  • Age of Wonders III
  • Stellaris: Apocalypse
  • Europa Universalis IV: Cradle of Civilization
  • Stellaris: Humanoids Species Pack
  • Stellaris: Digital Anniversary Edition
  • Tyranny: Archon Edition
  • Europa Universalis IV: Rights of Man
  • Crusader Kings II: Reapers Due
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Colonel
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Cadet
  • Stellaris: Galaxy Edition
  • Stellaris
  • Crusader Kings II: Conclave
  • Europa Universalis IV: Cossacks
  • Crusader Kings II: Horse Lords
  • Europa Universalis IV: Common Sense
  • Pillars of Eternity
  • Crusader Kings II: Way of Life
Awesome diary! :)

Are we to assume all religions will share (reflavored) events?
 

Adrianople

Second Lieutenant
68 Badges
Feb 24, 2015
173
105
  • Europa Universalis IV: Golden Century
  • Europa Universalis IV: Common Sense
  • Crusader Kings II: Horse Lords
  • Europa Universalis IV: Cossacks
  • Crusader Kings II: Conclave
  • Stellaris
  • Stellaris: Galaxy Edition
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Expansion Pass
  • Hearts of Iron IV Sign-up
  • Crusader Kings II: Way of Life
  • Crusader Kings II: Reapers Due
  • Europa Universalis IV: Rights of Man
  • Stellaris: Digital Anniversary Edition
  • Stellaris: Leviathans Story Pack
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Together for Victory
  • Crusader Kings II: Monks and Mystics
  • Crusader Kings II: Jade Dragon
  • Europa Universalis IV: Mandate of Heaven
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Death or Dishonor
  • Imperator: Rome Sign Up
  • Crusader Kings II: Holy Fury
  • Imperator: Rome Deluxe Edition
  • Europa Universalis IV: Dharma
  • Stellaris: Distant Stars
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Expansion Pass
  • Europa Universalis IV: Rule Britannia
  • Europa Universalis 4: Emperor
  • Battle for Bosporus
  • Crusader Kings III: Royal Edition
  • Stellaris: Ancient Relics
  • Stellaris: Lithoids
  • Hearts of Iron IV: La Resistance
  • Imperator: Rome - Magna Graecia
  • Victoria 2
  • Crusader Kings III
  • Stellaris: Apocalypse
  • Europa Universalis IV: El Dorado
  • Stellaris: Humanoids Species Pack
  • Europa Universalis IV: Mare Nostrum
  • Stellaris: Galaxy Edition
  • Stellaris - Path to Destruction bundle
  • Europa Universalis IV: Third Rome
  • Europa Universalis IV: Pre-order
  • Victoria 2: Heart of Darkness
  • Crusader Kings II
  • Crusader Kings II: Charlemagne
  • Crusader Kings II: Legacy of Rome
  • Crusader Kings II: The Old Gods
  • Crusader Kings II: Rajas of India
One real question at the moment: Will religions appear? Many cults and religious movements existed during the years that this game will focus on (and even more when there comes any expansions, I believe) and their appearances would not be odd.
 

Trin Tragula

Game Designer - Imperator
Moderator
28 Badges
Aug 1, 2003
6.460
11.504
  • Victoria: Revolutions
  • IPO Investor
  • Paradox Order
  • Mount & Blade: Warband
  • Europa Universalis IV: Pre-order
  • Crusader Kings II: Holy Knight (pre-order)
  • 500k Club
  • 200k Club
  • Victoria 2: Heart of Darkness
  • Victoria 2: A House Divided
  • Victoria 2
  • Sengoku
  • Semper Fi
  • Rome Gold
  • Europa Universalis III Complete
  • March of the Eagles
  • Magicka
  • Europa Universalis III Complete
  • Heir to the Throne
  • Hearts of Iron III
  • For the Motherland
  • For The Glory
  • Divine Wind
  • Europa Universalis III Complete
  • Deus Vult
  • Crusader Kings II
  • Arsenal of Democracy
i see now why you take so long to post a dev diary , thank you for all the time you waste writing all of this , it must be a real pain for you .
I really enjoy writing these tbh :)
 

C.N.

General
128 Badges
Mar 16, 2001
2.072
308
Visit site
  • Magicka 2
  • Pillars of Eternity
  • Warlock 2: The Exiled
  • Victoria 2: A House Divided
  • Majesty 2 Collection
  • Stellaris - Path to Destruction bundle
  • Stellaris: Galaxy Edition
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Together for Victory
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Cadet
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Colonel
  • Crusader Kings II: Reapers Due
  • Europa Universalis IV: Rights of Man
  • Tyranny: Archon Edition
  • Stellaris: Digital Anniversary Edition
  • Stellaris: Leviathans Story Pack
  • Cities: Skylines - Natural Disasters
  • Europa Universalis IV: Common Sense
  • Crusader Kings II: Monks and Mystics
  • Steel Division: Normandy 44
  • Cities: Skylines - Mass Transit
  • Europa Universalis IV: Mandate of Heaven
  • Steel Division: Normandy 44 Deluxe Edition
  • BATTLETECH
  • Surviving Mars
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Death or Dishonor
  • Age of Wonders
  • Cities: Skylines - Green Cities
  • Stellaris: Humanoids Species Pack
  • Teleglitch: Die More Edition
  • Shadowrun Returns
  • Surviving Mars: First Colony Edition
  • Europa Universalis 4: Emperor
  • Europa Universalis IV: Dharma
  • Europa Universalis IV: Dharma Pre-order
  • Cities: Skylines - Parklife Pre-Order
  • Europa Universalis III Complete
  • Cities: Skylines - Parklife
  • Hearts of Iron IV: Expansion Pass
  • Europa Universalis III Complete
  • Europa Universalis IV: Rule Britannia
  • Stellaris: Galaxy Edition
  • Victoria 2
  • 500k Club
  • Stellaris: Apocalypse
  • Europa Universalis IV: El Dorado
  • Magicka: Wizard Wars Founder Wizard
  • Mount & Blade: Warband
  • Crusader Kings II: Way of Life
  • Crusader Kings II: Horse Lords
These regional dev diaries really builds the hype for me.

BTW, you missed creating entries for Astakos and Commagene.