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Have you unpaused the game yet? Judging from what you've written I'm not quite sure.
In that update it was 1st of January, 1836. I was merely setting the scene. I should have perhaps made that clearer. Cheers Tanzhang.

Interresting choice, very hard country to get something out of it gamewise i guess,
and the worst country colour of all times ;)
(my MIP made Abu Dhabi bavarian blue if you want to change that)

I can only wish you luck! :)

More luck the better I guess! :) Its a shame I have played the game for so long. Bavarian blue does sound nice. Although the dark ghey isn't all too terrible for me hehe. I'll certainly look into it though. Thanks Alexspeed.

Best of luck! With that population and income you'll have to make the most of any chance that comes your way...

Yeah the income side of things is very restrictive for quite a while, some of that self inflicted in a way. Thanks for luck from you too aldriq.
 
Emirates United: Chapter 3 - The Future is Bright

Waheed called together the Sheikhs Council to try and get his dream budget approved. He approached the meeting with trepidation. “Will they accept my proposals?”, he wondered to himself nervously. Though he had spent a number of years in Abu Dhabi again since his returning from Britain, he found himself unsure of the minds of the emirs. Furthermore, he was worried that these men still didn’t trust him. “There is only one way to find out,” he internally prompted himself. Waheed began to run through the various aspects of his budget and vision.

The voting after each policy change was in Waheed’s favour. His vision for Abu Dhabi was approved, though not wholeheartedly on all counts. Indeed, the debate on the military changes (disbanding the irregular brigade and 0% military spending) had been at times heated. The emirs of Qatar and Bahrain were especially vehement about the issue. Their fear was of course directed westward. The Al Sauds had taken their lands before, they weren’t about to let it happen again. Their votes didn’t make a majority, so the changes were passed.

The matters of education and the hiring of bureaucrats were less heated. Apart from emir of Qatar, all were in favour of the changes in education proposed. The latter matter of the hiring of bureaucrats was a close call. The debate wasn’t heated, but the emirs of Qatar, Bahrain and Dubai all saw little value in the proposal. This meant that the voting was tied with Abu Dhabi, Ras al-Khaimah and Sharjah all in support. The emir of Abu Dhabi had the casting vote in such cases and passed the policy change.

Waheed was relieved and content that he had made the first steps in his vision for Abu Dhabi. In the back of his mind was niggling doubt about the emir of Qatar, who had opposed all the changes. Waheed hoped this man could be convinced in the future. He set out to implement his vision.

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Time passed fairly quickly and it wasn’t long before Waheed noticed the progress been made in his education reform. Great Muslim minds had flocked to Abu Dhabi. Discussions on thought and ideas were commonplace amongst these men. Waheed wasn’t yet satisfied. He wanted every Abu Dhabian involved in these discussions. From the humble nomad traders of the desert to the settled communities. All men should be taught to read at the very least.

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In early October news arrived in Abu Dhabi from a British merchant ship from British India. Russia was pushing into central Asia. This news meant little to Waheed. His concerns were more local. The plans for the bureaucracy weren’t moving forward. He was losing competent bureaucrats to the education sector. In November he changed his priorities from educators to bureaucrats (National Focus), the budget was suffering as not enough people were paying the government tariffs applied to foreign trade. This change was resisted again in the council but passed again with Abu Dhabi’s casting vote.

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The continuing budget problems eventually lead to having to make budget cuts in administration and education. Waheed was reluctant to make these changes, but the budget as was would have lead to bankruptcy. The emirs all agreed on the cuts, including the emir of Qatar. Administrative efficiency was up from 5.5% to 20% since the changes in November.

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News from Europe arrived in late January. An alliance of Austria and Prussia had succeeded in liberating Schleswig-Holstein to Prussian rule.

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By April improved administrative efficiency meant the budget could be returned to how Waheed wished it. The focus went back to promoting educators. The emirs granted him these changes, this time without so much of a fuss. Indeed they also passed a motion of their own, allowing for Waheed to make budgetary changes to administrative and education spending at he saw fit. This increased freedom filled Waheed with confidence. The emirs clearly trusted his judgements.

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Further international news trickles into Abu Dhabi. Russia again bullying the central Asians. This time forcing the concession of the Farrah region from Bukkhara.

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News arrives swiftly after a British success in southeast Asia. Britain managing to connect British India with the Moulmein region with the concession of Rangoon region from Burma.

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Later in the year Burma’s struggles would be compounded with the Chinese exploiting their weakness and declaring war.

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The end of the year had further news from the west. France having annexed Tunis and increasing their north African colonial land.

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The start of the new year filled Waheed with pride. The information he had spoke of almost a 1% increase in literacy within the country. Even more educators were filling the country. Waheed was confident that the education reforms would hold even more benefit in the future.

Stay tuned! Next chapter - The Power of Thought.

I think in the future I will just mention international affairs in writing. I took screenshots of just about everything, but it seems a little over the top to put in the screenies of lands taken. What do you guys feel?

I have about 40 saves of this game as well, so if going forward you would like information about anything don't hesitate to ask.

Any criticism is welcome. This is one of my first AARs and any feedback will be useful for me to make this AAR better.
 
Personally, I don't care whether France annexes Tunis or what's going on in Denmark or Burma. I'm only interested in what's happening in Abu Dhabi and it's surrounding sultanates. Unless something unusual happens overseas, like China Westernising or Switzerland annexing Bavaria, I would just stick to what's happening in you area.
 
Personally, I don't care whether France annexes Tunis or what's going on in Denmark or Burma. I'm only interested in what's happening in Abu Dhabi and it's surrounding sultanates. Unless something unusual happens overseas, like China Westernising or Switzerland annexing Bavaria, I would just stick to what's happening in you area.

Same
 
I'm with Tanzhang on this. News from the world can be mentioned in passing but there's no need for screenshots unless they directly affect the UAE. Other than that, this is quite enjoyable. Keep it up!
 
Those clergy numbers - so beautiful! :D

Thanks for your very meaty reply as well as an excellent update. I'll agree with information being related to Abu Dhabi/the Arabian peninsula (although I would include Tunis's annexation due to it's location on the Maghreb) - but do whatever you like and let that be the whole of your playing style. :) We'll keep reading, I can promise you that. It does seem like the military is going to be grumbling - but again, Waheed is working with the bare bones of an administration, and modernization is not as easy as adopting technology and customs - it is a constant struggle. But hey, we're rootin' for Abu Dhabi!
 
Personally, I don't care whether France annexes Tunis or what's going on in Denmark or Burma. I'm only interested in what's happening in Abu Dhabi and it's surrounding sultanates. Unless something unusual happens overseas, like China Westernising or Switzerland annexing Bavaria, I would just stick to what's happening in you area.


I'm with Tanzhang on this. News from the world can be mentioned in passing but there's no need for screenshots unless they directly affect the UAE. Other than that, this is quite enjoyable. Keep it up!

I agree with previous posters, no need to take screenshots for everything. And News-wise Waheed would likely be interested only on those related to fellow Muslim nations.

Yep that was where I was thinking of going. I think I will probably still mention annexations in passing. Thanks for your input Tanzhang, garudamon11 ,Selzro and aldriq.

Nice start and a very interesting choice of country! Almost... suicidal. :D

Almost! hehe :p Glad your liking it so far Commandante.

Those clergy numbers - so beautiful! :D

Thanks for your very meaty reply as well as an excellent update. I'll agree with information being related to Abu Dhabi/the Arabian peninsula (although I would include Tunis's annexation due to it's location on the Maghreb) - but do whatever you like and let that be the whole of your playing style. :) We'll keep reading, I can promise you that. It does seem like the military is going to be grumbling - but again, Waheed is working with the bare bones of an administration, and modernization is not as easy as adopting technology and customs - it is a constant struggle. But hey, we're rootin' for Abu Dhabi!

Nice to hear your in it for the long run! Thanks for your support Communitarian!

Nice,
Do you have freedom of trade?
If not, that should help out a low, from what I've seen.

Unfortunately like most uncivilised nations, I don't. As much as I would love to have it, my priorities have to be elsewhere for a while. It certainly is a great boon when I finally get it researched. Cheers for your comment Danking.
 
Emirates United: Chapter 4 - The Power of Thought

abudhabi1.jpg


January finds Waheed returning to Britain aboard merchant shipping. He wasn’t recalled, but found his correspondence with the United Kingdom becoming increasingly ignored. This troubled him and he wanted to go in person to see what the reason was. It became clear to him that since piracy on the coast was almost non-existent now, Britain felt any overtures were unnecessary. Waheed talked with whoever he could get his grip onto in Britain. He attempted to convince them that ignoring Abu Dhabi was perilous as the fledgling state could be overwhelmed at any moment. He made some impact, but was largely disappointed and made his way back home.

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News upon Waheed’s return was that the colonial power of Portugal had defeated the Omani Army and taken control of the Lindi region. Waheed suspected this was on the cards. Portugal had a large east African colony and wished to expand it. Omani weakness was clear and Waheed was glad that the passive emirs didn’t come to him with a wish to declare war. The focus would be internal for quite some time.

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This expansion of Portuguese East Africa and the continuation of their policy of slavery was frowned upon by the British. The Omani themselves had adopted a policy of isolationism. They had turned away the British envoys. Wanting to be closer to the action in east Africa, the British sent a small team to expand the ‘Diplomatic Mission to Abu Dhabi’, which formerly consisted of merely Waheed himself. The council grudgingly allowed this expansion, but public opinion was against the move. The upside of this was that while most of the mission was independent of Waheed, two staffers had been assigned to him.

Waheed was sure that one if not both of these men had been sent to spy on him. He would have to find creative ways to make use of these men and keep them from underfoot.

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Waheed sent one of his new aides, one John Wilson, to Bahrain and Qatar to ascertain the numbers of clergy and educators in those provinces. Wilson was a lanky man who walked with a long stride. His pale complexion didn’t serve him well in Abu Dhabi and he suffered in the heat. He wore glasses over his green eyes and black hair came down to his shoulder.

Thomas Smith, the other aide, was sent east into the emirates of Sharjah, Dubai and Ras al-Khaimah. Smith too suffered in the heat, more so than his compatriot as he was rather overweight. The man complained bitterly about his ‘political exile’ in Abu Dhabi. He had brown eyes and sported a full beard. Waheed supposed that his exile may well have been caused by the mans contemptible laziness.

The information these two men brought back late in 1838 was well received by Waheed. Smith’s was particularly accurate and detailed. Waheed now considered the irony of this man been a lazy perfectionist. Wilson’s report was by no means poor, but lacked the clarity of that of his compatriot. Waheed’s education reforms continued to show fruit. Literacy had increased half a percent and more educators continued to fill the ranks.

abudhabi5.jpg


Small enclaves of European expatriates dribbled into Dubai. The port there was one of the more important on the trade route to India. The locals weren’t happy with the coming of these people whom they were often in competition with for trade. The ideas of the Europeans did filter out into the people of Dubai which Waheed thought of as progress. He hoped that there would not be violence.

Waheed continued to tweak the budget and the foci of the country, enjoying the freedom he had attained from the emirs. He tried to keep the budget in surplus (usually by promoting bureaucrats) while maintaining as much of his focus as possible on the education side of things.

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January of 1840 finds the intellectuals of Abu Dhabi dabbling in philosophy. This is welcomed by Waheed, who sees the increased energy and endeavour amongst them.

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The British influences in Abu Dhabi lead to discussions about the works of Thomas Malthus, who’s works were now available.

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Waheed sent his aides again to report on the state of education in Abu Dhabi. This time reversing their roles to keep them on their toes. The numbers of educators continued to rise and the potency of the intellectuals was rising with it. Literacy too was on the rise, 1 percent more people could read and write in the nation.

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In the middle of 1840 Abu Dhabian philosophers released various works relating to the concepts around existence. The response around the world was positive and Abu Dhabi’s prestige was raised significantly. The council was especially pleased, even the emir of Qatar. They felt this was a direct consequence of Waheed’s reforms.

(I found I have 2 screenshots of this event one with 20 prestige and one with 5. I believe the one with 5 was the one that carried through the game. I think this must be because I had the bankrupcy bug. In that I went bankrupt while still having a positive balance. I must have loaded an earlier game and changed the budget a little to avoid it again. Anyway...)

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In late 1840 the works of Malthus had been translated. This led to much discussion and debate about his theories. These discussions involved an increasing amount of the population of Abu Dhabi who were benefiting from it clearly. The intellectuals continued their voyage into the realm of social thought.


Keep in touch for the next chapter: A Hint of Reaction

Once again.. comments, advice and criticism are encouraged! :)
 
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Interesting choice of techs - not going for westernization?
 
This seems to be going very well (although that +20 prestige would have really helped...). When playing as uncivs I've also been faced with the dilemma of going for the westernization techs right away or going for educational techs which will help me in the long run. Also, the dilemma of either freedom of trade (which I always end up picking) or saving up RPs for idealism, which can net lots of prestige, with some luck, and help with further research. It will be interesting to see a research path different from my usual choices.
 
Interesting choice of techs - not going for westernization?

Well, when you consider that the Westernization techs are all only 3600 RP, if you up your RP early, you can get them very quickly later on. Plus, it doesn't make sense to get some of the more useless Westernisation techs early on (Freedom of Trade is the only one that is really good to get early on) when you have below 40 prestige and 50 military score anyways. My new strategy with small uncivs is actually to pursue a very similar path in which I focus on research and education techs early on to boost RP, and then only research the Westernisation techs when I know I will have the presige and military score necessary to Westernise very soon. Plus, the earlier you boost RP, the more research you can accomplish over the course of the entire game. Big uncivs are of course a different story because they can achieve the necessary military score and prestige much more quickly.

@Kaltorak This is an interesting AAR, I've tried Oman, but Abu Dhabi seems much harder than that. I wish you luck!
 
I ALWAYS research Freedom of Trade first, that's just me...

Research seems to be going well though, I think it's time Waheed decided to go conquering...
 
Interesting choice of techs - not going for westernization?

2nd

Why aren't your trying to westernise?

Do you fear you can't meet the requirements?

I myself don't mind if people simply remove the mil score requirement as it is IMO stupid.