• We have updated our Community Code of Conduct. Please read through the new rules for the forum that are an integral part of Paradox Interactive’s User Agreement.
Love your narrative style!
 
  • 1
Reactions:
This is quite an unique perspective. A well-written one as well.
Lots of people who are thinking their lives will go on as their fathers and mothers lived, it seems. Guess they will be very wrong.
 
Chapter 1: A Mountain of Troubles: Through a side passage

Through a side passage​


Agustina Garcia hurried through the servants passage, carrying food that was worth more than she earned for the week.

She and her family has worked as servants for the family of their Patron for a generation. Somewhere in the building she knew her mother, Teodora, was directing the other servants as they cleaned the bedding.
Agustina had been made one of the main serving maids of the house because she had a knack for presentation, decoration, and because her skin was on the lighter side.

The role of race was something Agustina knew and understood without having to be told or being able to explain it. She could read the innumerable mannerisms and make the fine differences in the way people treated each other and how they perceived themselves based on whether they were closer to the original Peninsulares and Creollos, the Spanish men (it had mostly been men) who had come over from Spain or had been born here In mexico with “pure” Spanish blood. Together they had represented the elite of New Spain. When the fires of revolution shook Mexico, it had in the end been the Creollos taking their place at the top of the order from the Peninsulares.

Agustina’s mother looked like the average Mexican worker from Mexico City, that is, her skin was a definite brown. Agustina herself took more after her Father, and was lighter. The fact that her Father was also her employer was one of those accepted and hushed up and yet unremarkable facts of everyday life that she knew about but knew not to say out loud.

Agustina had been born in the estate of her Father and had helped her mother with her duties since she was old enough to walk. By now she knew how to do just about everything that needed to be done in the household. She knew how to sew and how to mend. She knew how to cook and how to plate a meal so that it appeared a work of art. She knew how to set a table and how to clean the dishes that remained. She knew how to pay attention to guests at a dinner table and quietly come and go, serving wine, beer or coffee. She knew the preferences of both the Master of the House, his wife, and all of the friends and guests he had over during social events. She even knew how to read names and lists of things so that she could handle invitations, the mail, and shopping excursions for the household. She knew what represented a good deal on meat, fruit, sugar and other household goods. She knew how to save and use the money she earned from her job to support herself and her Mother with some level of comfort. She knew how to listen to the ebb and flow of conversations so as not to interrupt as she served the table. She knew the ebb and flow of personal relationships, rivalries and history of both the other people who worked at the estate as well as the Master of the house and his guests, which meant that she knew many of the social and political web of relationships that defined Mexico City.

Tonight, as was usually the case for Saturdays, there was a social event, and the food she was carrying was the main dish. There would likely be leftovers, and one of the benefits of the work here was access to the leftovers of a dinner like this. She reviewed in her head the many things that she still needed to do to have everything at the ready. She took pride in her work, as her Mother had taught her, and even enjoyed her role as the “face” of the estate during social functions.

With a practiced motion she rested the tray against a wall, opened the door, and stepped into the main dining room. She knew the guests would arrive soon, and she and the house, must be ready.


6SkWeBCOcdDVKgooh4w4Vwd0kKRqjE53K40lCmhPKVN1W4nmlsNF3GP4nKEcP6kzRFzCVn6sTXQLuUHCwIlxlD01pZHSUPLqTQEdPigDHPnGATAFYX_-Jc-T75ECKAl9OApXrDREcY-XqvzxPfPAd3FUH2PzVp_TqKHfFHvp4MLqvAZ3ueDNJgXTeEX21w
 
  • 4Like
Reactions:
Congratulations, Chilango2! I have nominated you and this AAR for WritAAR of the week!

I said this previously, but again, thank you.

Love your narrative style!

Thanks! Glad to have you reading!

This is quite an unique perspective. A well-written one as well.
Lots of people who are thinking their lives will go on as their fathers and mothers lived, it seems. Guess they will be very wrong.

Yet another person who will be surprised at how much their life changes.

One thing I intend to explore is both what changes and what doesn't. I anticipate the answers will be interesting.

I'm really liking this so far. Mexico is in such an interesting position in this time period, and I'm looking forward to seeing what'll happen.

Mexico is really fascinating, and they are even more fun to play in V3 than in V2. In V3 you really feel how underdeveloped Mexico is at first (especially when you play a more developed country by comparison) and the simple effort of getting the economy off the ground and beginning to reform society really takes effort.
Especially since 1.1. my test games have really more accurately reflected the challenge of reforming Mexico, although I think i will try to explore the game without "moving forward" until 1.2 comes out.

Also wanted to remind you that the 2022 Yearly AARland Year-end AwAARds are up right now and open for voting. Think about what AAR's you have seen you have liked this year and vote for them.
 
I haven't seen too much about Victoria 3, the lack of player involvement in the combat system and the apparent lack of flavor the game has makes it rather unappealing to me. (Though tbh, vanilla Victoria 2 even with both DLC's is also rather bland)

However, despite that, this AAR looks promising enough; Mexico is such an amazing country to play this kind of game with. The way it depicts the populations seems interesting enough to keep me curious about it, I feel it will be nice to see how the population grows and their lives improve (or worsen in some cases). I don't know how you'll portray or deal with some events since I'm not sure which kind of events Victoria 3 includes for Mexico (if any at all), but I liked your writing style and the emphasys on the average citizen. I'll keep watching it, nice AAR. :)

(Hopefully this Mexico will be prosperous enough and stop the Americans from fulfilling the Coast-to-Coast, :p )​
 
Again, an interesting chapter. So far, we've only gotten lower classes though?
Any chance we get an insight to the head of the Master of the House, Maker of Bastards as well for example?
 
I haven't seen too much about Victoria 3, the lack of player involvement in the combat system and the apparent lack of flavor the game has makes it rather unappealing to me. (Though tbh, vanilla Victoria 2 even with both DLC's is also rather bland)

However, despite that, this AAR looks promising enough; Mexico is such an amazing country to play this kind of game with. The way it depicts the populations seems interesting enough to keep me curious about it, I feel it will be nice to see how the population grows and their lives improve (or worsen in some cases). I don't know how you'll portray or deal with some events since I'm not sure which kind of events Victoria 3 includes for Mexico (if any at all), but I liked your writing style and the emphasys on the average citizen. I'll keep watching it, nice AAR. :)

(Hopefully this Mexico will be prosperous enough and stop the Americans from fulfilling the Coast-to-Coast, :p )​

Prefrences vary of course, but I am highly enjoying V3. It's actually a very satisfying economic and society simulator. There are a decent amount of flavor events for the majors in the game from what I have seen, altough as with all Paradox games, this gets richer as the game gets more additions. The ar system is, of course, controversial. I think it is "basically ok" but understand why others might feel different.

Again, an interesting chapter. So far, we've only gotten lower classes though?
Any chance we get an insight to the head of the Master of the House, Maker of Bastards as well for example?

The choice to hear from the lower classes first is very intentional.
That being said, we will hear from the higher classes, don't worry.
 
Chapter 1: A Mountain of Troubles: Leaving the church

Leaving the church​


6jZpInNM-bI_OBx_9OhrMCQQyTKAEhStRLgUoN7qdVdvlyPwB2tCTYFeQaONIIlHXXTP-TovUM06bDd5Co1tTNpZpKVqGWPgg4Q5D-RjQyEnBIOR_T-5Pv_dxh1ytYznp3KfX4dvQRbkE87NJo15HFOtiLYGwcFhjScXvY1uBLpFXHcSKh5JQg6G8mlXkQ

Pablo Fierro finished writing a response to one of his friends from seminary with a quick little flourish and then carefully wrote out the address of his church. The postal system in Mexico was rudimentary in the extreme, but the letter would make its way there eventually.

He sighed and stretched. The small little church he ran was one of the many churches that dotted the countryside in the area. Among the fields of Maize and the little villages where the farmers and laborers who worked and lived there, his church stood out, as it was meant to.

When he had gone to seminary, he had imagined his calling to be many things, but he had not realized that his primary role was actually one of administrator. The church he was the head off was the central hub for many things in the community. It collected food and other things from the farmers as taxes and functioned as a sort of extended arm of the government by helping to keep records, collect taxes, and manage the community.

Because of this, he was in a rare position of power and influence in the community. He and his fellow priests effectively wielded more power than some of the local land owners of the various haciendas, and some of his fellow priests were not shy about acting that way.

He himself, he did not know, precisely, how to act.

Every day, he had the painful realization that he should be hearing something, but that there was silence. As man of God, surely, he should hear the voice of God, advising him telling him what to do, or at the very least the feeling of God’s love or support. But there was nothing, just stillness.
He wasn’t sure now, when the stillness began. He remembered hearing and feeling God in the Seminary, but somewhere, the last few years, God had either grown silent or he himself had grown deaf. And so, he felt as though he went through his day uncertain what to do, and so he did what seemed to be expected of him.

He knew how many people lived in the village, and he knew what taxes they were expected to pay, but he knew little else.. There was a barrier there, because while many of them technically spoke Spanish, in practice he did not speak the same Spanish, and so when he tried to talk to them outside of the basics of his job, the result was confusion or uncertainty.
And so, he was aware that while according to the government he knew a great deal about the area, in actuality, he knew very little. He did not know many of their names. He did not know, truly, what was going on in their lives. He did not know how their lives functioned, what their fears or concerns were. He did not know who was friends with who and who was an enemy. He could read his bible in Latin with ease, read letters from his fellow priests and from the government in Spanish, but when it came to his flock he was painfully aware of his illiteracy.

Most of all, he did know how to solve that: how to go from a man who knew little to a man who knew more, for he had always been educated, always, as a son of a Criollo family and one of the elite of Mexico, been in a position of power, knowledge and respect. And so, he did not know how to learn, because he has always been considered learned in the knowledge that seemed to matter.

He sighed again and decided to go for a walk. These sorts of thoughts increasingly troubled him, and he did not know how to make them go away, but walking and seeing the outside world would at least distract him, he knew at least that much.
 
  • 5Like
Reactions:
Hope you all have had a restful holidays! I certainly did.

If you have the time, please go vote in both the Q4 2022 ACA's and the 2022 Yearly End AARland Awards, both are which in session now. Some of you have been kind enough to vote for this AAR and for Songs of Saiiban, thank you.
 
  • 1Like
Reactions:
Again an interesting chapter. A disconnected priest.
And it seems you are moving to middle strata now.
 
Chapter 1: A Mountain of Troubles: The price of life

The price of life​


RuzBt0qA1Lff8Crp4qOy9ymc8nDjHWgTtJkoQAtzQmn8qQJ7kK2-ogxHcuLPnKxFbM-K3cKD9pvt2N2BcAybB-cASU1I139M5LuTUXujJ3VEBaYhcNzPtxho9XZd-6H8Ix9ex7wHt7_oqkFNLOUSgCYbZ9cTwiFvf3poSkMe7KaHZVUlZ4-CBbO2bcvaDw


pALvQSByyIyWua7BxTWCjI11Y0aqsPZCRWtzl4l1lkwGoo3LJFxSK8fOJ9ivxhtCSd38bfcBtpB-1GjtEDtKwZEYriak6QzwdF2HfIiayQDEEXgxBUYk6gyN5md2wmzkB2yx7U7x4dkTBzv9xyYlCql94zd1I-Mie6IdSZxs1wJufuUEJNGAX9QtrrF7Ng

The city of Veracruz had been the main port of Mexico since the Spanish arrival.

UFi9SfFtakFKQ8LEyDPh_SA8q-NrTh1IwOI09_Lpevh8Kssv7bKs2Y9Ip1zV6mBDYGEGCyDrVewjRFhbouD6tJfg_8tMc8h3eSTcNbW7fJYEq9VPVks3MKMmi85PtuqK4T6HrV145ea42jEkWqzZGl3A3E0uVNsKGW6LOBzqyCrK_sorUE1qjttRgtp-MA

All exports and imports in Mexico went through Veracruz, making it a city that sometimes rivaled Mexico City in wealth.

Daniel Ortega was a man who knew what things were worth. He knew that dye and sugar could be bought from the plantations inland and shipped elsewhere for a profit. He knew what the finest latest fashions, shipped in from France to be worn by the land owning plantations owners at their fancy dinner parties, were worth. He knew intimately all the buying habits of the upper class: the tobacco, the china and all the other things that the aristocrats in everything but name played with, and how much they bought it for.

But he also knew the price of things like corn and wheat that a farmer might try to sell to have enough money for other things. He knew that the while the price of such basic necessities was lower than the price of those luxuries enjoyed by the upper class, the price of just about everything in Mexico was high. He knew he did not envy the farmers, of that he was sure.

He knew, furthermore, the cost of the second hand muskets that Mexico bought from Britain.

BQErcbPKoaycfJ7U5nB-ksVf_X7BZth9nPzvHE8R1fYYj3yyBRZvaFUoyYsEPFIUi936fm-1MFgaKm-y0Rc3ZN0j2yHwkgPJ0ryfCMTUGR16j-AW8kGXO-4juTppys_LXIMiXrHfOBQHfzk8cujQyOiTKwsO6PfFvsBqlrH5Gq6AMRQySys-PMeQuTIXFw


An example of the India pattern “Brown Bess' musket made by the British during the Napoleonic wars and then later sold to many countries around the world for the next few decades.

As a trader, he knew the price of many things, including the price of taking a man’s life. He knew he was making a living comfortably off the profits from buying these cheap guns from the British and selling them to the Mexican army, which desperately needed them to equip its army as it fought against a series of revolutions, the latest one far away, in the north in Texas.

He did not particularly know, or care, that these revolutions had been instigated shortly after Santa Anna had taken power and done away with the old constitution. He did not know or appreciate the irony that by shipping in weapons from Veracruz he was repeating a pattern set down by Hernan Cortes one fine April some three hundred years ago wherein things were shipped in from the Old World that killed men in the New. He did not know that the fact that Mexico had no domestic arms industry to speak off and depended on second hand imports made during a war that had played a central part in the story of Mexican independence spoke to the weakness and dependence of the country he lived in, he just knew that those weapons meant profit to him.

As he stood in his office and looked over the port of Veracruz and saw a ship coming in, he knew was making a killing, and looked forward to buying whatever was on that boat and selling it (with a modest mark up, of course) to whoever needed it.
 
Last edited:
  • 4Like
Reactions:
Again an interesting chapter. A disconnected priest.
And it seems you are moving to middle strata now.

Glad you liked it. I can't promise that the progression of the chapters will be a linear voyage from the bottom to the top, but that is the way it is going right now.

If you have the time, please go vote in both the Q4 2022 ACA's and the 2022 Yearly End AARland Awards, both are which in session now, and both of which could use more people voting. To those who have voted for AAR's I have written, thank you.
 
  • 1Like
Reactions:
At least mr Ortega lives a secure life, not impoverished or struggling.
And let me guess, no paper production as well? So, without GB, Mexican bureaucracy comes to a halt?
 
Chapter 1: A Mountain of Troubles: Writer's block

Writer’s block​


L6z5rCJv-TtvhaHYRskC6MT5hap795XFwCpLcuasWRY2XgL9huDlNNpQNIipvNC_cuQrLBIDNWxdPQqgXLCUv7ZYejHRVawaFaguyWccfV67u71wHBwjWASwhbbhRl-0szYhkRrv5Krz9PpMZeFMMZw

The main plaza of Guadalajara, drawn around 1836 by Carl Nebel, a German architect

4ffmBMFH9ivLmdHsO9BGbwRMz1s_lp_qbx9NeB2YXd3H92jawOdR-NJmrXILNo2nK9KWrVrjWhWLcEQne0gwV9twzVokbKtv79yESN9nhp1r6mb7ENj8kGb7QJsYqnA9Kk6knOGu-mLCCoa-c2xd3Ow

The city of Guadalajara is located due west of Mexico City and is the capital of the state of Jalisco. It was the site of one of the oldest universities in Mexico, and in 1836 the only one that is still a going concern.

2T3ZL0Bm_O3G-xegkAvAbIRUobSYpqLgzx9a8PY4LtsIsyArhtO0LuoBUdqsBP7KqDKJlXlDDqXGMx4JrizzCF8qOzGOuc8IEhYPU87dnFFiGr9cpyK8RsFUDIq_zGIZYcKp6kkLARVVOmdIeEzk7kE


Inez Gomez sat in the shade as she read the letter. Around her a typical quiet afternoon kept her company. The letter was from one of her cousins in the capitol writing about the various dealings there. Politics. Schemes. War. The usual sordid things.

There were times she envied her cousin for her life in the heart of the country, but the truth is she knew it would not suit her. Not that she wanted to truly live on the outskirts, mind you, she knew that much. But the politics of the day were done at sword point as often as not. As a young woman, her best prospects would be some rich landowner or some officer, and both of those ideas bored her.

She sighed as she finished the letter and mentally started composing a reply before she committed it to paper. Paper was expensive enough that even for someone from a well off family it couldn’t be wasted on mistakes until she had thought through what she wanted to say.

The truth is, she wasn’t sure. The truth was, her future yawned up before her, and she could only see darkness. Not a darkness of despair or disaster, just simply a darkness of ignorance. Most of her day, she spent reading, some of it, she spent writing. Her Father, one of the teachers at the University of Guadalajara, did not seem to be in a hurry to suggest to her what she should do, for which she was grateful. But his lack of direction also left her without at least a plan besides the general ideas of the people around her as a whole. As a woman, she obviously could not work at the University itself, or really, engage in any sort of “official” work whatsoever. Perhaps she could find work as a governess, tutoring the young children of a landowner. Perhaps she would succumb to the inevitable and find some acceptable man to marry who would at least let her the books that were one of her main sources of joy.

And this is why she wasn’t sure what to write. Her cousin had told her about parties, scandals, plots. What could she write about in return? Guadalajara was no small town, of course, but next to the hurricane of the capital it was downright sleepy. Back during the revolution, things had been different: it had been one of the hotbeds of resistance and the source of many of the initial leaders of the revolution. But those leaders and their dreams, like much else in Mexico, had been killed, and Guadalajara had been a quiet little place since then, with only the University and its students (and some of its teachers) to keep things lively.

And of course, she reflected, the life of the University was not guaranteed. The University had been closed by the liberal government in 1826 and replaced by the Institute of Sciences (her father, who taught Medicine, simply switched the technical name of his employer). Then the Institute had been closed and the University had been reopened in 1834, just two years ago, and things were still settling back down. But everyone, including her father, knew that the existence of the University, which was run by the Catholic Church, was a bone of contention between the liberals and the conservatives and the existence of the University and the continuity of its institutions was anything but assured.

She also knew enough about the world through her reading to know that Mexico, much less Guadalajra, was not exactly a center of learning and discovery.
i7GZCDARDhfMQgF0gLlFy7_VwwCaJUIQqpgBE3GevVMlxFNhuIu6XxJgw7fITqymq4S_9bgx35RYT68ycBLF9WlzcCfOnG2XcUkP2HmAJY5N-OUVoise_ajeDqsUG_Z19NWBCAWnIciqNht3VZHH5pU


DIP0xQQarB4j6apP0hJiXgS8LK0dKTf6nfn4OoMYAVwDVeBkxwFaYr3NdjhOiHX7LLwGfcKNjidYVB7Fi-OVx0nejAmbpgeqyj9e-tpPTc6dV207JbmIGaeXTxmVtpfXdMgLR-U-3o0BdvNCuCmVU5E


The United States not only had an organized financial system it had a national bank, although she knew its existence was controversial. She knew no similar system of banks operated here. The list of what the United States or Britain, or anyone else, had that Mexico did not have was, to her knowledge, very long.

She sighed again. It was the listless, she decided, that gave her thought this melancholy turn. She liked to do things, to learn things and sitting here contemplating was causing her thoughts to go in dark directions. She might not know what she wanted to do or what she wanted to write to her cousin, she might not know what tomorrow would bring or what would happen to the University but she knew that if she went for a stroll through the Plaza she would feel better.

She put away the letter and called one of her Father servants to accompany her, striding quickly and decisively into the plaza, and into the unknown.
 
Last edited:
  • 4Like
Reactions:
At least mr Ortega lives a secure life, not impoverished or struggling.
And let me guess, no paper production as well? So, without GB, Mexican bureaucracy comes to a halt?

In the very long list of things Mexico does not produce, paper is on it, so yes, you are correct, GB could both crash our army and our bureaucracy.

War profiteers, as always, harm the nation, it's people, and all of humanity. Ortega is an heir of the colonialist mentality of extracting profit from the suffering of those far away and beneath him.

Splendid window into the economy, political situation and merchant classes if Mexico.

And isn't that the basic tragedy of much of Latin America in the post-colonial period? Soo many Burrs, not enough Hamiltons and Washingtons etc.

--
Thanks to all of you who voted for this AAR and for Songs of the Saiiban. :)

As mentioned previously, my plan is to continue to explore the state of Mexico at game start until 1.2 comes out and is in a stable state. There is now at least a (tentative) date for that patch to be released (march 13th). I have two definite ideas for two more posts I wanted to do for the start of the game, we'll see how things go from there.

As always, thanks for reading and for commenting.
 
  • 1Like
Reactions:
Hey! We finally have a hope that the game will actually start! Not that I mind though, for the introductions have been a class of their own.

And it looks like the future of poor Inez is kind of bleak. More secure life, but in a way, worse prospects than the people of lower classes.
 
Chapter 1: A Mountain of Troubles: At the head of the table

At the head of the table​


V6Kap5Niu_QBfwycBBUovfqNOWAVRLMiH2qTICtvpeJAy7Np2M4htzox-0e1SkWYYQRhZFT_3os4mC7Fyp__wMZoP6sugOrr09qQWbX8Gi4S3g_0sQ2ghYPOhD8eFc8w63iK7EGE9C5oqnuPdYmJ_rA


Alfredo Garcia knew the web of connections, rivalries, friendships and feuds which made up what passed for politics in Mexico.
Politics had always been a dangerous game here, and the Revolution had not helped matters in that regard. Things were bad. Politics was a game played with knives and swords and guns and bullets, not the ballot.

FKzf72a8rZmfc2COLwonNTTj24-nJZ1IsY075RFj1LtUuKV3UN84zfTpRkumOP0U1Q6-MOyzzOP02W6V1f00dtshAWSPdEg8lyfp9sEJnAZHF9T6G6lagFSwi0ekCwVVyB-vkpy_H5oavc2S2C6bRRo


The thing is, he wasn’t sure what to do. He had only hopes and dreams, not anything like a plan. The truth was that Mexico had careened from disaster to disaster since gaining independence. Still, to this very day, Spain had not admitted the independence of her former colony, although there were negotiations still going on to get them to admit the reality of that fact.

Hard to blame them, really, when Mexico always seemed to be on the verge of falling apart.
First, Iturbide and his joke of a Mexican Empire and a “House of Iturbide.” Then, the chaos under the 1824 constitution and the endless coups and counter coups. Santa Anna, always the schemer, always out for himself, switching from the liberals to the conservatives and killing the 1824 constitution and replacing it with a new one.

Alfredo knew that whatever its pretensions, Mexico was not really a republic any more. Oh, sure, on paper the Siete Leyes(1) that Santa Anna had formalized just last month had people voting for a Chamber of Deputies in a Congress. But instead of the universal suffrage of the 24 constitution it had strict property requirements. But even that was a joke, because the President could close Congress. In effect, the shaky democracy of the 24 Constitution had been replaced by a sort of constitutional dictatorship in all but name.

The Conservatives had said this was necessary to end the chaos unleashed by the 1824 constitution. He snorted to himself. Very well, now, in addition to coups, the nation was dealing with rebellions. One disaster after another.

And the series of disasters had brought them here. Here, was a party. Here was his home. He had invited some notables of both sides of the fissure in Mexico to see if there was some way out of the cycle of destruction. He did not know that there was.
As he glanced at his “unofficial” daughter doing her duties, he reminded himself, as he well knew, that he was not the best of men. He had sinned in his life, although he had tried to do what he could to atone for those sins. He knew that there was plenty of evidence for all the famous sins in the Capital, and some of the not so well known ones as well. Unlike many of his fellows, he believed, at least on an intellectual level, that the workers at his estates deserved the right to have a say in the affairs of the nation. He knew the list of tired disagreements the two sides, liberal and conservative, kept having since the Revolution started. The role of the Church. Federalism vs centralization. On and on. Right now, the conservatives were in ascendancy and had, in effect, re-instituted their beloved Monarchy in all but name. But he knew it could not last, but he did not know how to make them see that, have them believe it, and act in the interests of their nation rather than for themselves.

No, he did not know the way out of their predicament, but as he saw the guests arrive he knew that he had to try and figure something out, or they would continue as they had been, destroying each other, destroying themselves and destroying the country and its people.

(1) The Siete Leyes (Seven laws) was a constitution created by Santa Anna in late 1835 which ended the 1824 constitution that had governed Mexico since the ouster of Iturbide. While the 1824 Constitution was federal in is structure (similar to the US) and had universal manhood sufferage, this constitution instituted property requirements for voting and created a unitary state more similar to that used by the French Republic.
 
Last edited:
  • 5Like
Reactions:
Hey! We finally have a hope that the game will actually start! Not that I mind though, for the introductions have been a class of their own.

And it looks like the future of poor Inez is kind of bleak. More secure life, but in a way, worse prospects than the people of lower classes.

Inez' plight is one that is a common one in early feminist writers/circles. Upper class well educated women who are shut out of the secondary/informal employment of the lower classes (which, however undesirable or difficult, can present a sense of a role and function in society and can give a woman access to social capital), but cannot participate in the types of employment they have the education for. And so you have all this potential...that has nothing to do but lead a household and be a housewife. In a perverse way, Inez has more privilege than her poorer brethren, but she has arguably less control (although her level of power is...complicated).

Glad we've enjoyed the introductions!

The next post will likely be a meta comparing V2 to V3 sort of game theme analysis.
 
  • 1Like
Reactions: