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Soon half the world is flying German aircraft. That could be quite a bolstering of especially the Regia Aeronautica.
 
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Interesting that you integrate the whole deal with the Japs buying production licenses for those DB-601 engines. I do wonder what happenes in game to explain this story... did they buy the Bf-109F licenses and then, when they were built, they came out as Ki-61, or was that just meant as a joke because Bf-109 and Ki-61 look quite similar. Or did they come out as Bf-109Fs, and then the Airframe was upgraded, which was when they became Ki-61s?
And the Italians are wise not to overburden their aeronautical industry's artisanal production lines with orders for new types of Aeroplanes...Buying from the Germans is definitely more efficient and cheaper than producing their own planes, so in the end, they have more planes to fly, and the Germans get to fill some of that budget deficit...

From an inter-operability standpoint this is also great, if everyone in the alliance flies planes with the same guns and engines, all the mechanics can basically service all of the planes regardless of which nation they fly for. Also, you only need bullets and engine parts of a few types for everyone, I'm sure German and Italian logisticians will be thanking their god, you, for making that happen...Though I don't think you get a repair and re-ORG bonus in game when all the Aeroplanes in a wide area are of the same type... so that aspect is definitely not portrayed in game...

Secret agents and NSAP provocations... all very peaceful...

I like the image of parties at the Italian embassy in Tehran, those must be some epic, and elaborate, parties... I don't blame the Iranians for being swayed towards the Axis, now all your ambassador has to do is convince them they are under grave threat and that the Axis nations are the only ones who can help protect Iran from Communists and Colonialists alike...
 
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Soon half the world is flying German aircraft. That could be quite a bolstering of especially the Regia Aeronautica.

Interesting that you integrate the whole deal with the Japs buying production licenses for those DB-601 engines. I do wonder what happenes in game to explain this story... did they buy the Bf-109F licenses and then, when they were built, they came out as Ki-61, or was that just meant as a joke because Bf-109 and Ki-61 look quite similar. Or did they come out as Bf-109Fs, and then the Airframe was upgraded, which was when they became Ki-61s?
And the Italians are wise not to overburden their aeronautical industry's artisanal production lines with orders for new types of Aeroplanes...Buying from the Germans is definitely more efficient and cheaper than producing their own planes, so in the end, they have more planes to fly, and the Germans get to fill some of that budget deficit...

From an inter-operability standpoint this is also great, if everyone in the alliance flies planes with the same guns and engines, all the mechanics can basically service all of the planes regardless of which nation they fly for. Also, you only need bullets and engine parts of a few types for everyone, I'm sure German and Italian logisticians will be thanking their god, you, for making that happen...Though I don't think you get a repair and re-ORG bonus in game when all the Aeroplanes in a wide area are of the same type... so that aspect is definitely not portrayed in game...

Secret agents and NSAP provocations... all very peaceful...

I like the image of parties at the Italian embassy in Tehran, those must be some epic, and elaborate, parties... I don't blame the Iranians for being swayed towards the Axis, now all your ambassador has to do is convince them they are under grave threat and that the Axis nations are the only ones who can help protect Iran from Communists and Colonialists alike...

Indeed, it's quite true that how the Japanese came to have the DB-601 engine was quite ingenious. Basically, they bought one Bf 109, tore it apart and designed their own version. It was originally why the Germans didn't transfer them any more Bf 109s in OTL. Indeed, when US pilots first came into contact with the Ki-61, they thought it was a Messerschmitt! This time around, Germany is in such financial straits that they can't turn down the hard currency! The system in HoI3 doesn't model license production as "foreign" equipment in a similar way to say, HoI4. I see this as a bit of a failing, but not one that I'm going to really get bothered by. Some things will be wonky, and I can keep track of who has what for the most part.

They would have to be epic parties for Reza Shah! He wasn't exactly the cheapest to work with. We'll have to see if he cooperates with the Axis or if there has to be a sort of mirror-image Operation Countenance to bring a more... amenable... Shah to the throne!
 
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Bringing Denmark on side?
 
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With such a unified approach and leadership (ie human vs AI) the Axis will be unstoppable. The Allies and Soviets won’t realise what has hit them until too late.
 
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Bringing Denmark on side?

That is one of the stated goals. There isn't much of a desire on the part of the German high command to bring wars to the Nordic nations, so we're trying to bring Denmark and Norway into our sphere of influence.

With such a unified approach and leadership (ie human vs AI) the Axis will be unstoppable. The Allies and Soviets won’t realise what has hit them until too late.

I wouldn't necessarily go quite that far. Some of the plans have been stopped. Profligate wastes have been incurred by some nations...
 
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so, you send Italians to do von Ribbentrop's job? that's interesting... those lavish parties
 
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so, you send Italians to do von Ribbentrop's job? that's interesting... those lavish parties

Well, there's been more significant strategic planning in this 'verse... The Germans are doing the same for Denmark, Norway and the United States.
 
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so, you send Italians to do von Ribbentrop's job? that's interesting... those lavish parties

Italian parties seem to be quite resilient if nothing else, just look at how many scandals Berlusconi's party has been able to survive!

At least it gives von Ribbentropp more time to try and come to an agreement with the Soviets and organize German press releases in connection with the provocateurs' actions. And try to convince the Danes and Norwegians that Germans are actually decent fellows, a job that is perhaps more easily said than done.
 
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just look at how many scandals Berlusconi's party has been able to survive!
Where did these scandals mostly occur... at parties...and we've gone full circle...
 
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Where did these scandals mostly occur... at parties...and we've gone full circle...

If a party results in zero scandals, was it even a party in the first place, let alone a good one? It seems at least the Italians have realized that the answer is a resolute, resounding no, and are proceeding accordingly!
 
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If a party results in zero scandals, was it even a party in the first place, let alone a good one? It seems at least the Italians have realized that the answer is a resolute, resounding no, and are proceeding accordingly!
I suspect the Italians have a far higher bar set than most for what rates as scandalous conduct at a party. :D Probably not having scandalous behaviour occur would indeed be considered a scandal! Thus, not only have we come full circle, but it is getting smaller and spinning faster! :eek: It will soon disappear up its own fundamental orifice! :p And that would be a scandal. ;)
 
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III: 3. Left Out in the Rain: The Munich Treaty and the End of Czechoslovakia
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Left Out In The Rain:
The Munich Treaty and the End of Czechoslovakia



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A map of the Sudeten region.
A crisis began developing in late July 1938 in the western regions of Czechoslovakia. Having been created without regard to ethnic and cultural relations during the negotiations carving up of the Austro-Hungarian Empire after 1918 during Versailles, significant numbers of ethnic Germans were kept from joining Germany. Concentrated in one area, a movement emerged called the Sudeten German Party or SdP, which served as the branch of the NSDAP in Czechoslovakia. By 1935 the party had become the second largest in the nation as it concentrated German political power throughout Bohemia while the rest of the Czechs and Slovaks diluted their own across a multitude of parties. The leader of this movement, Konrad Henlein, had met Hitler a few months after the Anschluss back in 1936. During the meeting, Henlein was encouraged to begin agitating for the autonomy of Germans living in Czechoslovakia as well as other demands, a movement which became known as the Carlsbad Program. In late June, the government acquiesced to some of the demands, offering more minority rights to the ethnic Germans in their country, but refused the calls for autonomy.


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Chamberlain and Daladier, helpful architects of their own demise, here
lauded for their efforts in Munich.


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Konrad Henlein, head of the SdP. A useful tool for the GD
to beat the Czechs with.

British and French outlooks were intent on avoiding war at almost any cost. The French would not risk a war they would fight alone, since British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain considered the German claims against the Sudetenland justified. These opinions were further backed with a statement from the Polish ambassador to France informing their foreign minister that Poland would not move with France to defend Czechoslovakia. The British, for their part, demanded that the Czechs begin by requesting a mediator to resolve the disputes and--wishing to keep the nation in the good graces of the Western Powers--the Czech government accepted that demand. The British mediator, Lord Runciman, arrived with instructions to encourage the Czechoslovaks to comply with Sudeten demands; the French ambassador informed the Czechs that while public support would be provided, France would not go to war to defend them. A series of staged demonstrations by the SdP during these negotiations--resulting in several of their parliament members being arrested--caused the allies to break off any further negotiations.


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Protests in the Sudeten region caused such disruption outside
of its actual impact upon the Czechoslovak nation, permitting
Hitler to make a gamble.

More violence in the Sudeten region led Chamberlain to ask Hitler for a face-to-face meeting in order to resolve any differences in the region and avert a war. The meeting, over three hours long, saw Hitler demand the right of the Sudeten Germans to self-determine their future and to join Sudetenland to Germany. Italy seemed to join Germany after a speech made by Il Duce in Trieste, saying that “Italy has chosen its side.” The Soviet Union also announced its’ willingness to join the Czechoslovak side; President Edvard Benes was loath to accept that assistance without western aid fearing that it would result in a communist regime assuming control. The Geheimdienst, acting on orders from Frick, began conducting disinformation and insurgent campaigns in the territory. With the two nations near war, an intense diplomatic effort between Mussolini, Hitler, French Defense Minister Daladier and Chamberlain led to the midnight signing of the Treaty of Munich on 10 September. Fallout from this agreement was swift: the Soviets, thinking they had been betrayed by the French, began a rapprochement with the Reich, denouncing the Poles as “jackals” after they had taken some territory as well. In Britain and France, however, Chamberlain’s proclamation of “Peace for our time” rang hollow to some. Attitudes in the press changed and some began to wonder aloud if that statement would wind up haunting him.


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“Peace for our time” meant Chamberlain was extremely popular
domestically but he had sown the seeds of his own downfall.

Recognizing the diplomatic defeat of the Munich Agreement, Great Britain began a wider diplomatic push to nations which were targets of Italian and German diplomatic efforts. Beginning in October and running throughout the remainder of 1938, British diplomats alternated their efforts largely between Iran and Portugal, two nations close to the German and Italian spheres of influence. Publicly, Chamberlain and Daladier were hailed as heroes in their respective nations; upon his triumphant return to Paris, Daladier beheld the cheering crowds and muttered to his aide, "Ah, les cons!" or "The morons!"


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Daladier being welcomed home in Paris after the signing of
the Munich Treaty. His popularity would see him rise to the
Prime Minister position early in the next year.

In a burst of revanchist sentiment, Hungary, seeking a redress of its’ own borders after Poland had received territory from the Munich Agreement, sought to resolve those disputes from Germany and Italy. Czechoslovakian efforts to refuse were all in vain and on 10 November, the Vienna Award was concluded. Bohemia and Moravia were absorbed by Germany, Ruthenia was ceded to Hungary and even Poland occupied another small piece of territory. Slovakia was formed as a German client state, and one of her first official acts was to sign a purchase order for 100 Ju-87B Stuka dive bombers for almost $15 million.


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The New York Times headlines declaring Great Britain’s
support for Poland, though there had been no movement
of Wehrmacht forces at that point in time.

In response to this escalation in tensions on the Continent, the United Kingdom officially guaranteed the independence of Poland who promptly joined the Allies as did South Africa on 10 November. Six days later, both France and Poland mobilized for war. The Fuhrer decreed in a speech delivered by radio to the nation that the name of Germany would be forevermore the Großdeutsches Reich--the Greater German Reich.

*****
 
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Czechoslovakia has disintetrated and with it a potential opponent is gone. Surely now the nations around Germany will band together to prevent any further German expansion. France will surely reinforce her treaties with Poland and Romania and though Poland and the USSR are historical enemies i am certain they will put their differences aside to halt the facist threat before it consumes Europe. The status quo thus achieved will surely guarantee Peace in our time.
 
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So matters proceeding ordinarily ... but peace will surely not be forever.
 
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But the 3 axis countries can coordinate in a way they didn't historical, if they all jump on the British possessions.
 
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so quickly it comes...
 
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So it begins.

I must say, I never saw such deep All-Axis AAR and certainly not so detailed :) amount of suspension gathered by this story would already make few nuclear explosions.
But i guess some of them will happen here later, anyway :p
 
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The pieces fall into position, and the peace will fall into flames. Good to see the Czech event given some proper detailed treatment.
 
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