• Crusader Kings III Available Now!

    The realm rejoices as Paradox Interactive announces the launch of Crusader Kings III, the latest entry in the publisher’s grand strategy role-playing game franchise. Advisors may now jockey for positions of influence and adversaries should save their schemes for another day, because on this day Crusader Kings III can be purchased on Steam, the Paradox Store, and other major online retailers.


    Real Strategy Requires Cunning

cccino

Oberleutnant z. S.
82 Badges
Sep 6, 2002
1.319
1
forum.paradoxplaza.com
  • Naval War: Arctic Circle
  • Hearts of Iron III: Their Finest Hour
  • Heir to the Throne
  • Europa Universalis III Complete
  • Knights of Pen and Paper +1 Edition
  • Lead and Gold
  • Leviathan: Warships
  • The Kings Crusade
  • Magicka
  • Majesty 2
  • Majesty 2 Collection
  • March of the Eagles
  • Europa Universalis III Complete
  • Hearts of Iron III
  • Penumbra - Black Plague
  • Europa Universalis IV: Res Publica
  • Victoria: Revolutions
  • Rome Gold
  • Semper Fi
  • Sengoku
  • Ship Simulator Extremes
  • Sword of the Stars
  • Sword of the Stars II
  • Teleglitch: Die More Edition
  • The Showdown Effect
  • Prison Architect
  • Dungeonland
  • Hearts of Iron II: Armageddon
  • Cities in Motion
  • Crusader Kings II
  • Crusader Kings II: Charlemagne
  • Crusader Kings II: Legacy of Rome
  • Crusader Kings II: The Old Gods
  • Crusader Kings II: Rajas of India
  • Crusader Kings II: The Republic
  • Crusader Kings II: Sword of Islam
  • Commander: Conquest of the Americas
  • Darkest Hour
  • Deus Vult
  • Arsenal of Democracy
  • East India Company Collection
  • Europa Universalis III
  • Europa Universalis III Complete
  • Divine Wind
  • Europa Universalis IV: Art of War
  • Europa Universalis IV: Conquest of Paradise
  • Europa Universalis IV: Wealth of Nations
  • Europa Universalis IV: Call to arms event
  • For The Glory
-----------------BASIC-STATS-----------------
Realm: Hanseatic League
Head of State: Hanseatic Council
Religion: Catholic
Culture: German, Baltic, Scandinavian
Stats: 2/2(3)/9(10)/10(8)/3(6) --> [2/3/10/8/6]
Provinces: 3
Ports: 3
Owned: Holstein(4), Bremen(4), Götland(1).
+1 Seamil, +1 Technology, -2 Morale Mercenary, Non-Feudal, Naval State
+3 Economy Denmark, Holy Roman Empire and Teutonic Order are tributaries

------------------------------------------------




Short History

In the mid-1100s the north German city of Lubeck became the base for trade with Swedish Visby and Novogorod in Russia. The Lubeck merchants acquired a coveted monoploy on trade of the rich herring stocks off the banks of Sweden. Fish was a vital part of the medieval European diet because the Catholic church prohibited the consumption of meat on the frequent fast days and during the season of Lent. But in times before refrigeration fish was extremely difficult to preserve and transport. The Hamburg merchants, who had easy access to the Kiel salt mines, became natural allies of the Lubeck merchants, supplying salt for preserving fish.

Around the same time Cologne and an alliance of towns along the Rhine acquired a monopoly on trade in Flanders and England. In 1265 the Rhenish towns and the Lubeck alliance agreed on a common legislation for the defense of merchants and their goods. This alliance created a powerful trading bloc that controlled the shipping of grain, fur, timber, honey, fish, and flax from Russia and the Baltics to the west, and cloth and guild-manufactured goods from Flanders and England to the east.

Travel in medieval times was a risky business and cargoes were threatened by brigands on the roads and pirates at sea. As tax revenues started to flow from the free towns in the Hanseatic alliance to emperors and dukes, the merchants were in a position to influence the lords to pass laws to protect the Hansa cargoes.

The dukes and kings of the Baltic region saw the riches that resulted from allowing a free Hansa town in their kingdoms and invited German merchants to build towns, granting them independent charters - creating Reichsfree Stadts - so long as activities weren't directed against the empire and taxes were paid regularly. The Germans built numerous Hanse towns in the Baltics - towns like Tallinn in Lithuania and Riga in Latvia are still filled with original buildings and character from their Hanseatic days.

The handsome Hanse towns were often constructed of red brick, with the first public hospitals and Gothic churches in medieval Europe. Germanic guildsmen, or craftspeople, settled in the region and introduced traditional German craftsmanship. The entire town bustled with well-organized enterprise. Surrounded by stone walls, narrow, winding streets led to the central market-place which teemed with trade: merchants flogging spices and expensive cloths; craftsmen selling tools, furniture, or jewellry; and peasants vending poultry, eggs, honey, grains, pigs and sheep. Town festivities were held here, and criminals were publicly humiliated. Watching over all was the Guild-hall in the centre of the square, symbol of the Hanse merchants' administration and the town's independence. The Hanseatic merchants introduced mayors, magistrates' courts and tradesman's associations called guilds into their town structures.

Hanseatic merchants established counting houses - or beurs - in four different cities: Novogorod in Russia, Bergen in Norway, the Steel Yard in London, and Bremen in Flanders. These were the forerunners of today's bourses, or stock exchanges. Merchants that wanted to serve in the counting-houses agreed to live there for at least a year. They had to be of good character and unmarried and their terms of service were very strict - at night they were locked up behind bolted doors watched over by guard dogs.

At the height of its power in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries the Hanseatic League consisted of around 160 cities who met infrequently in a parliament of sorts called a Diet. Regional diets also took place in the four districts: Westphalia, Wendia, Prussia and Livonia. Larger cities would often speak on behalf of the smaller who didn't send a representative.

Shamelessly stolen from http://www.i-friesland.com/Hanseatic_League.htm


Treaty of Stralsund

The Treaty of Stralsund (May 24, 1370) ended the war between the Hanseatic League and the kingdom of Denmark. The Hanseatic League reached the peak of its power by the conditions of that treaty. The war began in 1361 with the capture of Visby, a hanseatic town on the island of Gotland, today belonging to Sweden. King Valdemar IV of Denmark took the town and declared it to be Danish.

The leaders of the Hansa in Luebeck, who had the greatest interest in the Wisby "counter", were outraged and pushed for war. The Wendish third was in favor of the war, but the Rhennish third saw no interest to be gained from it and the Prussian third were forbidden to take part by the Grand Master of the Teutonic Order, who was a friend of Waldemar's, though they were allowed to give financial support. Despite the lack of support from the other thirds the Wendish third decided to undertake a campaign against the Danes, who they saw as pirates. They picked Johann Wittenborg of Luebeck to lead the expedition and fitted out 52 cogs, each with 100 men-at-arms, and 104 smaller auxiliary vessels to carry out the attack.

The campaign was initially quite successful and the fleet sacked Copenhagen and took with them the bell from the main church. They then went to attack the Danish fortresses on the Scania coastline of the sound. The plan was to meet with an army provided by Magnus Erikson, King of Sweden, who held sovereignty over Gotland in order to besiege the fortress of Halsingborg. When the Hansa fleet arrived there was no Swedish army to be found and Johann Wittenborg made a grave error in taking the men-at-arms off the ships in order to besiege the fortress. Several days later, with the soldiers all on land, the Danish fleet sailed into view, and with only skeleton crews on most of the German vessels most of the German ships and Provisions were either sunk or taken captive. Johann Wittenborg was forced to sue for peace and march home in disgrace. While the merchants in the Hansa tried to save his life the outraged citizenry of Luebeck demanded his death and a year after sailing he was publicly beheaded in the city square. The Hansa, in the terms of peace, was forced to cede most of its revenues from the herring fisheries to the Danish crown.

Waldemar was a cunning man and he felt that since only the Wendish cities had taken part in the war with him he had only made peace with the Wendish cities and not the Prussian ones. Therefore, Danish attacks against the Prussians increased through the next decade causing the Prussians to repeatedly call for a reopening of the hostilities, but the Wendish cities, who had lost so much in the first war without the support of the Prussians and the Rhennish third, were not in any hurry to take the risk again. Finally the situation became totally intolerable and the Wendish cities were persuaded to join into a unified campaign which would include all of the cities. This time the Grand Master of the Teutonic Order, who had lost revenues to Danish attacks, did not interfere with the Prussian cities' involvement. Further Waldemar, who had taken the last half decade to try to consolidate his power against his own nobles, found his nobles either unwilling to support him or in alliance with the Germans. Waldemar was forced to flee Copenhagen and stay as a guest of the Grand Master of the Teutonic Order, who treated him graciously as a guest but gave him no aid against the Hansa, counselling him to sue for peace instead. Waldemar had no choice and agreed to a treaty which gave the Hanseatic merchants sweeping rights.

In the treaty the freedom of Visby was reestablished. Furthermore Denmark had to assure the Hanseatic League of free trade in the entire Baltic Sea. The Germans gained control over the revenues from the herring fisheries, control over the fortresses of the sound, the right to be the only ships allowed to enter the port of Bergen with their tops in place (Haakan Haakanson, the Norwegian King, had allied with Waldemar), and the right to veto any person's ascension to the Danish throne for fifteen years. When that time period was done the Hansa returned the fortresses to Danish control, though popular sentiment was against it.

Shamelessly stolen from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Treaty_of_Stralsund & http://members.bellatlantic.net/~baronfum/hansa.html


Hanseatic Cities

Wendish and Pomeranian Circle
Lübeck (Chief City)
Hamburg
Lüneburg
Rostock
Stettin (Szczecin)
Stralsund
Wismar​
Saxony, Thuringia, Brandenburg Circle
Braunschweig (Brunswick, Chief City)
Berlin
Bremen
Erfurt
Frankfurt an der Oder
Goslar
Magdeburg​
Poland, Prussia, Livonia, Sweden Circle
Danzig (Gdansk, Chief City)
Breslau (Wroclaw)
Dorpat (Tartu)
Elbing (Elblag)
Königsberg (Kaliningrad)
Reval (Tallinn)
Riga
Stockholm
Thorn (Torun)
Visby
Kraków​
Rhine, Westphalia, Netherlands Circle
Cologne (Chief City)
Roermond
Deventer
Dortmund
Groningen
Kampen
Osnabrück
Soest​
Counting Houses
Principal Kontore
Bergen
Bruges
London
Novgorod

Subsidiary Kontore
Antwerp
Boston
Damme
Edinburgh
Hull
Ipswich
King's Lynn
Kovno (Kaunas)
Newcastle
Polotsk
Pskov
Yarmouth
York

Other cities with a Hanse community
Anklam
Arnhem
Bolsward
Brandenburg
Cesis (Wenden)
Chelmno
Doesburg
Duisburg
Einbeck
Göttingen
Greifswald
Halle
Harlingen
Hannover
Herford
Hildesheim
Hindeloopen
Kalmar
Kuldiga (Goldingen)
Cracow
Merseburg
Minden
Münster
Narva
Nijmegen
Paderborn
Pärnu (Pernau)
Perleberg
Quedlinburg
Salzwedel
Smolensk
Stargard_Szczecinski
Stendal
Turku (Åbo)
Tver
Valmiera (Wolmar)
Ventspils (Windau)
Viljandi (Fellin)
Wesel
Zutphen
Zwolle​
Shamelessly stolen from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hanseatic_League


Hanseatic Trade
http://www.klitzfamily.com/Map_Germany.html




Trade Goods
http://www.hullcc.gov.uk/archaeology/hanse.htm
 
Last edited:

cccino

Oberleutnant z. S.
82 Badges
Sep 6, 2002
1.319
1
forum.paradoxplaza.com
  • Naval War: Arctic Circle
  • Hearts of Iron III: Their Finest Hour
  • Heir to the Throne
  • Europa Universalis III Complete
  • Knights of Pen and Paper +1 Edition
  • Lead and Gold
  • Leviathan: Warships
  • The Kings Crusade
  • Magicka
  • Majesty 2
  • Majesty 2 Collection
  • March of the Eagles
  • Europa Universalis III Complete
  • Hearts of Iron III
  • Penumbra - Black Plague
  • Europa Universalis IV: Res Publica
  • Victoria: Revolutions
  • Rome Gold
  • Semper Fi
  • Sengoku
  • Ship Simulator Extremes
  • Sword of the Stars
  • Sword of the Stars II
  • Teleglitch: Die More Edition
  • The Showdown Effect
  • Prison Architect
  • Dungeonland
  • Hearts of Iron II: Armageddon
  • Cities in Motion
  • Crusader Kings II
  • Crusader Kings II: Charlemagne
  • Crusader Kings II: Legacy of Rome
  • Crusader Kings II: The Old Gods
  • Crusader Kings II: Rajas of India
  • Crusader Kings II: The Republic
  • Crusader Kings II: Sword of Islam
  • Commander: Conquest of the Americas
  • Darkest Hour
  • Deus Vult
  • Arsenal of Democracy
  • East India Company Collection
  • Europa Universalis III
  • Europa Universalis III Complete
  • Divine Wind
  • Europa Universalis IV: Art of War
  • Europa Universalis IV: Conquest of Paradise
  • Europa Universalis IV: Wealth of Nations
  • Europa Universalis IV: Call to arms event
  • For The Glory
Prussian Third
Danzig

Matters of and pertaining to the Prussian Diet of the Hanseatic League, in Danzig, and the Livonian Diet, in Reval.
 

unmerged(8054)

Captain
Mar 3, 2002
338
0
www.europa-universalis.com
Somewhere in the Baltic


In the name of his Royal Majesty, Oluf, By Gods grace KIng of Denmark and Norway.
Onto his loyal vassal, holder of the landless fief of Marienburg Harbour, commanding five ships of war in the Baltic, emissary to the Teutonic Order, Hans Hansen.

Due to recent outbreak of open warfare between our catholic brethen in the Teutonic and Livonian Orders and their pagan foe, Lithuania, and additional 3 ships of war will arrive to support those ships allready under control. These ships will serve under their own captains, but will be subject to your orders. Any tax colected or other income generated by these ships will be divided per the old traditions of the ledung.

With these reinforcements, your task will be threefold.
You will continue to uphold your obligations as holder of the landless fief Marienburg Harbour.
In addition, you will prevent such supplies as necessary for warfare to reach Lithuania through sea. Ships bound for Samogotia will be intercepted, their cargo inspected, and should it, by the best judgement of the captain commanding the intercepting ship, be supplies for warfare, the cargo shall be redirected to Danzig.
In addition, you will protect Christian shipping. We cannot trust Lithuanian pagans to respect that only the brothers of the Crusading Orders wage war upon them, and not to show their frustration on other non-warring christians in their lands. Therefore, should ships commanded by christian captains, mainly from the Hanseatic League, attempt to conduct business in materials not needed for war with Samogotia, said ships are, for the safety of their crew, to be redirected to Danzig or other harbours under command of Christian nations. Ships not obeying such orders or actively resisting such orders are to be treated as hostile.

In the name of her son
Margrethe Valdemarsdatter, Guardian of Oluf.



Hans Hansen had read that order several times, and each time he praised himself lucky. It was almost as good as an direct order to prey on Hanseatic merchants, and all knew that it was in preying on the Hansa the real profit lay. The landless fief, and with it the right to tax merchants a protective tax, had been paying nicely, but the chance to capture ships was the real reason he'd come here, and now it was about to pay of.

So far, the ship he personally commanded had not been overly succesfull. He had inspected two Swedish ships, but they had not been carrying supplies for war, and he dared not anger the Swedes by redirecting them to Danzig, not without direct orders to do so. He had followed one Hanseatic ship, but it had eluded him before he boarded, and he had not had the chance to test his orders.

So the slow Hanseatic cog he had his eyes in now came as sent from Heaven. As low as it lay in the water, it had to be fully loaded, and that also meant it would have great difficulties outrunning him. Whether or not it was bound for Samogotia was debatable, but Hans Hansen could claim he had inspected it just to be certain, and once he and his armed men got aboard, he could easily construct an excuse to seize it.
His men was almost as eager as he were. Allthough he as captain and owner would claim the greatest part of the bounty, they knew that the ledung rules for dividing plunder ensured them a nice profit as well. So his orders to raise sail and navigate closer to the cog were quickly followed.
The Hanseatic vessel, her captain knowing full well that he was chanceless to outrun the Danish ship, did not even try to run, and Hans Hansen smiled to himself as his ship came alongside and threw boarding lines over. The Hanseatic sailors even helped secure the lines, and those of them who carried weapond had not drawn them. Obviously, they did not expect a Danish ship to behave like a common pirate, and puzzlement was clear on the Hanseatic captains face as he greeted the Danish boarders.

"What is the meaning of this?", the merchant asked, but without any real anger. "My ship and goods are under the protection of the Hanseatic League." He invoked the Leagues protection more from habit than any real fear, but was allready reaching for his purse. Even the Germans respected the Danish fleets right to demand protection tax in these water, mainly because the protection tax was pretty low, and because the Danish ships did keep the waters almost safe.

This time, however, Hans Hansen was not about to be feed of with a few coins. His orders gave him far greater authority.
"In the name of the Danish king, to support the Crusading Orders of the Teutons and Livonia, I demand to see your goods."
The German captain actually smiled when hearing this, as he mistakenly believed that placed him outside danger.
"If you like. As you'll see, I'm transporting salted fish from Skåne to Stettin. Nothing to worry about for the crusaders.""
Hans decided he was not about to let any price slip through his fingers. Never mind that salted fish was obviously not meant for warfare, and never mind that Stettin was obviously not under the command of the Lithuanian pagans. He could allways claim the German had lied to him, or refused to cooperate.
"I don't trust you. I don't care what you're selling, but for your own safety, I refuse to let you land in Samogotia. The Lithuanian pagans will surely kill both you and your crew. You are to let a small group of my men come aboard, and sail to Danzig. It is for your own good."
Now the German realized that this was no ordinary Danish taxation. However, his voice betrayed more anger than fear.
"I shall do no such thing. I have no business in Danzig, but plenty in Stettin. And I am not even about to land in Samogotia. Did you not hear what I said?"

That was what Hans had waited for. A pure refusal to cooperate, thus allowing him to treat the captain and his outnumbered crew as hostiles. Hans drew his sword and stepped closer to the German, and across the ship, his men, who had been prepared for such an eventuality, had their weapons drawn before the German sailors had the chance to react.
With his weapon posed to strike, Hans once again spoke to the German captain, this time in a voice so loud that most of those aboard heard it.
"Your refusal to cooperate with my reasonable requests proves that you are working for the pagans, upon which true christians are waging a crusade. Your ownership of this ship is forfeit as a result. This ships now belongs to me. Do you surrender?"
The Hanseatic captain was no fool. A fight would be lost within seconds, as all the Danes were armed, and only a handfull of his own men even carried undrawn weapons. Still with more anger than fear, he responded.
"Have it your way, pirate. I surrender. My family in Lübeck will pay for my safe return, and then I shall have Hanseatic ships hunt you down."

Ignoring the theath, Hans spoke again, this time directed to the sailors: "An armed party will take this ship to Danzig, there to sell the cargo. Those of you who so desire can be transferred to my vessel and serve as sailors to replace them. Those not willing to take service with me will be kept in chains and released in Danzig. Climb aboard my ship if you accept my offer, stay here and lay down your weapons if you prefer captivity and a trip to Danzig."

Of the 11 Hanseatic sailors, 5 choose to serve on Hans' ship. In their reasoning, one master was almost as good as the other, and they could make their way back to whatever port they came from in time. The remaining six were chained, as was the captain who had just lost his ship without bloodsheed, and Hans transferred 8 of his men to take his price to Danzig.

Back aboard his own ship, Hans smiled as he saw the cog sail onwards. The cargo would fetch a nice price, and so would the ship itself once he found a buyer for it. In the meantime, he would see if he could find a merchantman or two more. The crusaders would soon have their foes subdued, and thus his fragile excuse for capturing ships would be lost. He had to make the best of it while it lasted...
 

unmerged(17489)

General
Jun 7, 2003
2.475
7
A leter arrives to the Hanseatic office in Lübeck


Unto the Hanseatic League,

I have recently returned from Marienburg, and let me say that I am not satisfied with how I was treated there. The crusader order is respected and blessed for their actions on the battlefield, but our German brethren seem to lack a bit in proper manners. Perhaps it is the pagan wilderness that have corrupted herr von Rothstein or the lone superiority in the order that has made him forget the sixteenth chapter in the book of proverbs: 'Contritionem praecedit superbia, et ante ruinam exaltatio spiritus'. Pride goes before destruction, and a haughty spirit before a fall.

Considering the recent success by the Lithuanians outside Moscow I would not be surprised if the Lord would make the Order pay for their foolish actions. I can also tell you that the so called crusade is issued under a false bulla which the grand master zealously follows. What the result of all this will be, I do not know, but it is in the Lord's hands and we can do nothing but pray that he will forgive the foolishness of the leader and instead look at all our German brethren knights who must go to war thanks to his thoughtlessness.

However, I write to you primarly because of other things. The Swedish nobles are yet again getting restless, and I would like to invite a representative of your splendid German league to Stockholm and we will discuss how the trade will be handled in the future. I would also like to discuss how Hanseatic interests in Sweden can be protected, for they are truly numerous and beneficial for both of us.

May you continue to find peace in our Lord,

Signed in Stockholm,
Albrecht von Mecklenburg, King of Sweden


 
Last edited: