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unmerged(28944)

Would-be King of Dragons
May 10, 2004
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Nice and lucky rematch with the Brits. I think you could have gotten more, but hey, that's just me. :rolleyes:

It shall prove interesting what you can accomplish with dear old Georgie. Good luck, eh?
 

unmerged(59737)

Strategos ton Exkoubitores
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Let's hope that GW does better in round 3 than he did the first time around.
 

Lord E

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Seems like you did well against the British this time, and getting some new provinces was a nice way of ending the war. Now it shall certainly be interesting to see what Washington will do during his period as President.
 

unmerged(58610)

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Adams has certainly silenced his critics who might have thought his pro-British views would have sidelined America's interests. Good result from the war.

When one British regiment started wreaking armies much larger, you must have thought you were going to lose again. I suppose it's too much to hope that those three British provinces will revolt away to you?
 

Grundius

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I reacted with a "what, just 2 provinces with that ws?" when I first saw the result of the seconde Anglo-American conflict, but remembered the max 3 provinces rule of EU1! The only way to ever get all those English lands in NA will be to conquer them whole.
 

CatKnight

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Battle bunny: And nothing. Couldn't get 'em to give me a third province, and they'd stopped offering. I wonder if the EU1 AI gets depressed. If you refuse it enough, it doesn't like you anymore. :)

J. Passepartout: Hm. To be honest I didn't read about von Steuben's later life. I think Prussia's fighting Poland, maybe he wanted more glory. :)

Draco Rexus: No, actually. Short of annexation, the best I can possibly do is 3 provinces. For European Wars, I like it. Simulating America's growth (or from England's end bringing us down) it's not so good.

I don't seem to do well with Georgie: Stewart assassinated him in Resurrection, and General Murray knocked him out of the war here.

Fulcrumvale: Yep!

Lord E: As Fulcrumvale sez, hopefully better than in '73! :)

Duke of Wellington: I think the AI could have...if this was a European war. The British AI either disbanded or moved 99% of its army out of North America. Strange, especially given it has cores on me and we're at -200 relations. I figured it'd WANT a rematch.

Chief Ragusa: Probably. The revolt risk in those provinces is zero. As for that one regiment wreaking havoc, I thought it more annoying than anything. I hate it when the AI sneaks one past you and starts indiscriminately raiding. :mad:

Grundius: Not even then. Remember England's a major power, so immune to forceannex.

Languish: Thanks!
 

CatKnight

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usa13starsmallvb0.jpg

1784-1788


IV: Knife In the Heart

washingtonfj3.jpg

George Washington
Third President of the United States Congress


Positional Advantages
When Congress elected George Washington to take the presidency, they gave him a healthy and confident nation. Franklin's economic reforms, Adams's sponsoring of colonies and a very successful war catapulted America into prominence and already some of her citizens spoke of a manifest destiny to control the continent.

President Washington expected another war with Britain. As part of the treaty ending the American Revolution in 1773, Britain was to repeal the Quebec Act, which in American eyes returned all lands east of the Mississippi River to their jurisdiction. Parliament declined to discuss the matter, and the British Colonial Office and Governor-Generals of Canada and West Florida (modern southern Alabama and Mississippi) invoked their claims. Washington felt this could only be settled by force of arms, which set him apart from John Adams who'd hoped to avoid the second war.

Historians are unclear whether Washington <i>wanted</i> war. His supporters state that Washington, more than most of his brethren, understood the hardships of warfare and merely planned to assure America's land claims. Opponents point to said hardships - the destruction of his entire army and months imprisoned eleven years previous - and charge him with desiring revenge. In the 1787 presidential campaign, John Adams wrote:

Verily, Mister Washington says he desires freedom and liberty, when in fact he's only proven a champion of division and destruction. It is unrealistic to believe that the ideals we fought for in the year 73 are compatible with the security necessary to defend the secrets of a warrior state like he would devise.

Regardless of his motives, President Washington spent the first two years of his tenure exchanging increasingly direct letters with General Arnold over troop disposition. He argued America had any number of men with enough skill to lead an independent force, yet they all served under Gates or Arnold.

Benedict Arnold, a proud and temperamental man, resisted Washington's ideas and more than once told him to "mind his own affairs." Finally in October 1785, Washington tired of his insolence and appointed Horatio Gates as commander in chief. Disgusted, Arnold resigned the next month.

Washington's plan, which Gates accepted with minor modifications, had Arnold, then later George Rogers Clark moving south to take command of newly appointed General Malcolm Fremont's cavalry. General Charles Lee moved to Albany, holding the west end of Canada's flank with Gates in the middle, and the Marquis de Lafayette held the east.

On the home front, Congress pushed through the Northwest Ordinance. Among other things, the Ordinance said:
. Territorial claims by individual states beyond the pre-Revolution borders were null and void: This land would be used to create new territories and states.
. Congress would control claimed territory until they had 6,000 residents, when they could elect a territorial legislature.
. Once the territory reached 25,000, the legislature could begin work on a state constitution.
. If Congress approved the constitution, the territory would be welcome as an independent state with all the rights and privileges enjoyed by the original thirteen.

Explorers, eager to take advantage of America's claim to the entire eastern half of the continent, migrated west. America underwrote colonial towns along Lake Michigan and Lake Superior (modern Michigan), including the city of Detroit founded in 1784. (Detroit, Michilmakinak) In 1786, taking advantage of a lapse in Spanish security, Washington authorized a new colony on the banks of the Rio Grande. (Rio Grande province) Originally he envisioned a penal colony, but it quickly became haven first to explorers, then runaway slaves smuggled across French Louisiana with a nod and wink from French colonial officials. This new colony called itself Texas.

In January 1786, rebels from the Palatinate broke away from France. The French invoked their alliance, but received a nasty surprise when Baden and Spain broke alliance. In his memoirs, President Washington explains why he asked Congress to do the same.

At the time the French still fought British interests. I felt they were already wholy committed, whereas Spain was not. Upon entering dialogue with the Spanish ambassador, I learned they held a very favorable view of our aims...
(Dishonor alliance. Start new alliance with Spain.)

Alas, the French were not wholly committed. One year before England founded a new colony on the banks of the Mississippi River. (Yazoo province) Eventually Washington would use this provocation to advantage. In the meantime, Louis XVI of France thought America's refusal, especially after welcoming them into the brotherhood of nations, somewhat meanspirited like a spoiled child. Along with supporting runaways across Louisiana into Texas, he sued for peace with the British, securing that same colony within American claims. (France defeats England, gains Yazoo)

On August 18, 1786, citing the former British colony as proof of their intent to continue supporting the Quebec Act, Congress declared war. Spain immediately agreed.

Round Three!

Commander-in-Chief, General Horatio Gates anticipated the bulk of the fighting would be in Canada. He planned for a three-pronged assault to maintain positional advantage. General Lee would seize the lands north of New York to the Saint Lawrence River - an aim of the war since British outposts in the area liked to harass American shipping coming out of Lake Erie. He would then go north and seize Hudson Bay Company holdings. General Gates would advance to Montreal and Quebec. Marquis de Lafayette would take New Brunswick, prevent counterattack from Nova Scotia, and send any troops he could spare to Gates.

1786northce6.jpg


In the south, General Clark's one aim was to secure British West Florida, thereby forming a common land border with the Alabama Territory (Mobile) and depriving them of their last gulf port. He would then stay there against possible amphibious assault.

1786southmp0.jpg


By the time Parliament learned of the declaration of war, Clark was already at the coast, Lee at the St. Lawrence, and Gates annihilated a British regiment south of Montreal. On September 23 they sued for peace, offering the land Clark had taken. American ambassadors responded with Washington's demands, and the conversation ended there.

On October 16, Clark succeeded in his mission. Garrisoning the gulf port he detached General Fremont with a half regiment of cavalry to strike into Britain's northern holdings and "deprive them of the use of OUR river now and forever." Congress supported this and commissioned a cavalry regiment to join Fremont enroute.

1786octle2.jpg


The British army, distracted by war in India, couldn't respond to such a coherent attack. Governor Carleton, Baron of Dorchester conscripted every loyalist he could find, and with five full regiments met General Lee outside of Montreal. Lee still outnumbered him 2:1, and with American morale so high following their systematic advance they proved invincible. Carleton died, much of his army captured and Canada lay prostrate.

With Montreal and Three Rivers sieged, Marquis de Lafayette ran through New Brunswick with impunity. Once more Parliament proposed peace, offering part of West Florida and free access to the St. Lawrence. (Tuscaloosa and Ticonderoga.) Once more Congress refused and counteroffered, but Prime Minister Pitt felt a port so close to American and French holdings too useful to give up.

Then in November 1786, the British struck back.

One regiment sent by ship seized Wilmington, North Carolina and struck for the unprotected American interior hoping to force Congress to an "equitable, honorable and above all reasonable" peace as Pitt put it. Instead they told General Clark to leave a small garrison at the Gulf, then strike north and destroy the interloper. Through the winter of 1786-87 they maneuvered through the lower Appalachian Mountains, finally fighting near Roanoke, Virginia. Clark won easily, dispatched men to seize the tiny English garrisons, then settled in Norfolk to await further developments.

A second British force seized Texas. America had no navy, and so no means to take it back.

In the north, General Fremont entered what's now Wisconsin. After fighting natives loyal to England, he destroyed British lake settlements and sent the survivors by boat and horse to Quebec. Reinforcements finally arrived, and in spring 1787 he destroyed Britain's last settlements along the Mississippi.

At that time General Gates, conceiving that only a decisive defeat would convince Britain to surrender, ordered Fremont, General Bridgewater with what troops Lafayette could spare, and General Sandwich from Lee's command to strike deep into Canada, seize Hudson Bay, and let the merchants tell Parliament to stand down. Congress reinforced this with a trade embargo, ordering a seizure of all British shipping in American ports.

The northern campaign would take fifteen months including constant warfare with Eskimos and other natives and an exceptionally brutal winter near the Arctic Circle. Of the 3,500 combined men sent out, only 600 made it home.

Meanwhile, the heartland of Canada systematically fell before Lee and Gates: Three Rivers, Chambly and Montreal fell in the summer of 1787. Now they turned their attention to the big prize: Quebec City.

Peace negotiations continued in London and Philadelphia. Seizing Texas and raiding the American interior gave Parliament newfound confidence, and their offers slimmed despite losing much of Canada. For their part, Congress continued to insist on West Florida and part of the St. Lawrence. Still they refused, and so the British army tried one more time to break American resolve.

2,000 men under General Marcus Armstrong landed in Wilmington, North Carolina AGAIN. Advanced intelligence warned them of Clark's disposition though, and so they led the American a merry chase across North Carolina, western Virginia, and part of the Northwest territory. Finally on April 29, 1788, five months after their reign of terror began, Clark trapped them outside of Charleston, South Carolina. He was infuriated over the dozens of burned farms and looted villages left in their wake, so following their surrender he charged Armstrong and his senior officers with banditry and murder. A kangaroo court found them guilty in less than an hour and he hung them. Frustration made the Third American/British war turn ugly.

Frustration. Soon after Clark's victory and resulting celebrations - intercepting the British army proved surprisingly lucrative and spurred the Carolina economy for years to come (Free Goods manufactory in Allegheny) - Congress learned English settlers, with French tolerance if not approval, snuck up the Mississippi River and forged yet another colony on its banks. (English colony in Fox!) This, and Parliament's continued refusal to even discuss their gulf port, convinced Congress to seek peace.

First, however, George Washington argued British Canada could not ever be a threat to American interests again.

Their audacity and arrogance, refusing a reasonable settlement and continuing to stake claims on land God and treaty have both given unto us, leads me to say King George must be taught respect so that he interlopes on us no more!

He proposed Operation: Retribution, the systematic destruction of all Hudson Bay holdings as well as fishing settlements in Labroador. The northern states vehemently opposed this.

John Adams said:
And what will this accomplish? We want peace. They want peace. The matter is resolved. Devolving into this kind of barbarism will only generate a hatred that will guarantee future war, not prevent it. Further, what will the world think? They will call us thugs and bullies, and rightly so!

Intense debate followed. Armstrong's raids frightened the southern states badly however, Maryland worried it could happen to them, Pennsylvania didn't want Brits on their side of the Mississippi, New York feared Canada's power and New Hampshire simply wanted revenge for years of occupation. The vote:

Proceed: GA, SC, NC, VA, MD, NY, PA, NH
Deny: NJ, NY, CT, RI, MA

In July 1788, the Hudson Bay Company ceased to exist.

1788juljq5.jpg


Peace finally came, reverting to the terms offered back in October 1786. Clark's southern gains, minus Biloxi of course, were incorporated into Alabama territory. New York immediately claimed Lee's northern gains, and that was about when the fighting started.

1788endro8.jpg


A Constitution

The Articles of Confederation proved a failure. Most of the country's power resided in the individual states, which was fair enough but meant Congress lacked the strength to deal with fierce interstate rivalries. Along with the insurrections in the Mid Atlantic that plagued Adams's tenure, New York and Connecticut argued over Long Island Sound, Massachusetts bickered with New Hampshire over access to their northern territory. Virginia and Maryland bitterly contested fishing and shipping rights in Chesapeake Bay. "Veto" rules allowed even one state to block serious legislation, and even failing that Congress didn't have the power to force state legislatures to listen.

As early as 1786, Washington and Adams pored over the details of a new Constitution. Debate continued through most of 1787, with many - like Thomas Jefferson or Edward Rutledge of South Carolina - alarmed at the power it invested in Congress. Slowly they devised a system of checks and balances to hopefully prevent oppression.

This early Constitution went into effect in 1788, once nine state legislatures approved it. It lacked a Bill of Rights, or really much about civilians at all, nor the ideals that led America to break from Britain. As Benjamin Franklin surmised shortly before his death in 1790 however: It was a beginning.

The breaking point, which led to three assemblies ratifying the Constitution within days of each other, came in August 1788. Enraged over New York's claim to the new northern land, New Hampshire immediately claimed it for their state....and Vermont as well! New York mobilized their militia, while local partisans informed both assemblies Vermont had, in fact, been completely independent since 1777 "though we are willing to discuss matters with the entire Congress." As the situation threatened to spiral into a three-way showdown, Gates and Lee appeared in Bennington and Burlington respectively, with nearly thirty thousand men, announcing they would finish any war someone saw fit to start and asking Congress for instructions.

The new Constitution at least ensured Congress could deal with the competing claims. That would have to wait, though, for by its terms an election was set for December 1788.

A President

This left almost no time for campaigning, not that anyone seemed inclined to with Vermont threatening to explode any day. By the Constitution, each state would choose a number of delegates through any means they saw fit. Each delegate had two votes: They could not vote for the same person of course, nor could both votes go to people from their home state. Whoever had the most votes, if it was at least 50%+1 of the electoral collage (and thus 25%+1 of the number of votes) would win.

With so little time, most state legislatures simply discussed the matter and selected delegates accordingly. Delaware, Maryland and Virginia tried to organize formal elections but with winter approaching two Maryland delegates and two Virginia either weren't named or didn't vote in time. The New York state assembly hopelessly deadlocked and ended up sending no one at all. Rhode Island and North Carolina hadn't ratified the Constitution and so weren't eligible.

Similar to the Retribution vote, John Adams won in the north, while George Washington secured those states threatened by General Armstrong. South Carolina split the southern vote by unanimously supporting Edward Rutledge, who did well in several other states as well. New York and Rhode Island's non participation hurt worse though. Historians agree that, had they participated, Adams would have won.

Election of 1788 said:
George Washington: 50 votes
John Adams: 44 votes
Edward Rutledge: 18 votes
Horatio Gates: 14 votes
(Various Other): 12 votes
* Needed to win: 40

Map: Colored by highest vote getter
1789electionfg6.jpg
 
Last edited:

unmerged(58610)

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Jul 2, 2006
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A very close run thing. Whilst the US states fight over the spoils, the old trading posts around the Hudson Bay and Great Lakes will receive British colonists instead.

The US has one more southern Birtish colony to take. I would like to see Washington take a stab hit and launch the attack during his second term. I felt you missed a trick after Arnold had been dismissed. He could have defected to the Britsh and been appointed commander of the locally raised loyalist forces.
 

Lord E

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Seems like the British fought hard and didn’t want peace on your terms. That sure must have been a bloody and frustrating war, but in the end victory was secured. Well done.
But I see it is not only against the world that the Americans are fighting, there seems to be enough trouble at home as well. Let us hope those conflicts can be solved so that the US can stand united against foreign enemies :)
 

unmerged(28944)

Would-be King of Dragons
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Quite a frustrating little war you had there, Cat.

With George back in the Presidency for a second term, what are your aim this time around? Another go at the Brits, or a move into Indian territory to get closer to the French and slap them about?
 

Grundius

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Operation Retribution worked marvelously, but I fear the British will claim those provinces again before you can take much.
 

KushanHiigara

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While I lack EU1, it is quite interesting to see the differences, and such an exciting AAR from an older game! Kinda reminds me of the differences between Baldurs Gate and Baldurs Gate 2 :)

That said, you really are going all out to keep America to yourself! Not totally ahistorical I suppose, though a bit more militant than I recall us being :D Keep up the fine work and superb roleplay!
 

CatKnight

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Chief Ragusa: Ah, the English can have Hudson Bay. As you'll see they don't even get it. :)

You're right, I could've used Arnold for the British loyalists. I'm so used to him being a good guy (I rehabbed him in Resurrection, and 1785 is long after the date he defected IRL) I completely forgot about him.

As for taking the stab hit...nah. I thought about it, but I consider it an exploit. After all, the AI doesn't break truces, and I knew England wasn't capable of fighting me at that point. Don't fret though, I wasn't idle!

J. Passepartout: Not really. The war was never close, except for their damned southern raiders.

Lord E: Ah, happy, united nations are boring. A little political turmoil is good for a people. :)

Draco Rexus: We'll see!

Grundius: As I said, Hudson Bay doesn't really interest me. That was more petty vengenace than anything. :)

Duke of Wellington: No, the Euro AIs just don't seem good at continental wars. The only reason England stood up to me the first time was all those troops on hand. Then again, EU1 has an IGC (Improved Grand Campaign) and enhanced AI mods. I should prolly grab them at some point.

KushanHilgara: Hey Kushan! Stop by and check out Tannenberg when you get a chance and see some EU2 madness. :)

You're certainly right about this being more militant than IRL. In EU1 (and EU2) I have no choice. Historically Britain gave all lands east of the Mississippi to America by treaty in 1783. This is accurately represented by cores. However, in 1792 IRL Britain removed the last of its colonists. EU1 doesn't have the time nor capability, and EU2 just plain doesn't do that. (EU2 could fix that by an event of course.) If you want the continent to yourself, you need to beat on the British consistently and often.

My task is actually much harder in EU1, because while the AI appears to be bad at colonial wars, it's GREAT at colonization! Read more to find out what I mean.
 

CatKnight

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usa13starsmallvb0.jpg

1789-1792


V: Once More Into the Breach

Though the continued presence of a British gulf port and their new provocations east of the Mississippi River angered Congress, President Washington didn't have the support to renew fighting. The 1788 election hardly counted as a ringing endorsement and his new vice president, John Adams, adamantly and loudly opposed any renewal.

Still, Washington felt with some justification the Europeans didn't take their fledgling nation seriously. British colonists tried to expand their town along Lake Michigan. (Fox) Far more damning, French settlers crossed into what is now Minnesota, Wisconsin and Illinois. (Milwaukee, Duluth, Illinois)


Hey!

Washington sent a terse warning to Louis XVI, which he ignored. In Louis's defense, France was in the process of falling apart and he had other problems. Washington appeared before Congress on August 20th.

Gentlemen, there are only two things for it. We either accept this invasion of our sovereign territory, or we fight.

If we accept this, we effectively void our treaty with Britain forbidding European settlement east of the Mississippi. It removes all justification for the last war. Further, it requires us to engage in a long term attempt to spend all our resources out-colonizing the two great powers of our time, a task we are not as yet suited for.

If we fight, the Spanish will stand with us. We will defeat them as we did King George and so secure America from those who would cage her in.

Vice President Adams resisted, but this was more token than serious. He decried the negative effect on trade this would have, but secretly hoped this would be the first step to a renewed friendship with Britain - or more correctly, Britain's vast resources.

Through the summer leading up to this announcement, as terse discussions with the French ambassador broke down, Washington moved the bulk of the American army to their western frontier. On September 17, with a slim majority Congress declared war. (UNITED STATES, Spain vs. FRANCE)(Baden dishonors French alliance)



Frog Hunt

The French army was in Paris, and their government was - to put it nicely - divided. There was therefore no resistance as General Lee seized Yazoo in September, then arrived days behind a Spanish advance to Fort Prudhomme (Arkansas). General Gates destroyed their trading posts in Illinois, then seized Fort Dubuque (Missouri) in October. General Clark destroyed northern French timber and fur towns (Duluth, Iowa, Minnesota) before rushing south to help.

Two French regiments, the entire Louisiana garrison, encountered General Lee on October 24. Lee has the defensive advantage and four regiments, easily routing the French. The massed American army pushed south and actually made contact with their Texas Territory (Mississippi falls, Wichita and Concho destroyed.)

French reinforcements, six regiments strong, launched an amphibious assault on Texas in January. They won, but while marching up the Gulf Coast near modern-day Houston they ran into 3 Spanish regiments. General Gates with eighteen more arrived days later, annihilating the French invasion in February. They retook Texas, and in March General Gates besieged New Orleans.

The National Assembly of France flatly refused to negotiate, asserting all the land rights the French monarchy had, and so the war dragged on. The New Orleans swamp handled the combined American/Spanish army cruelly, and hundreds died of insect-borne diseases in the Spring of 1790.

In October 1790, President Washington encouraged new settlers to move north of Texas. He hoped to establish, in time, a land connection between their penal colony and America proper. That was also when French raiders landed in Wilmington, North Carolina and the town fell yet again. For years to come rumor had it that the mayor of Wilmington kept copies of many European flags locked away 'just in case.'

Congress didn't find this amusing. Fortunately they'd had the foresight to recruit a fresh army near Philadelphia. They chased the French raiders west, finally bringing them to task in the Northwest Territories and destroying them.

Following this 1791 passed quietly. French defenders continued to hold out in New Orleans, resupplied by a hundred smugglers and pirates in the Gulf. America had no navy to combat these with. Once more disease wracked the American army - the Spanish gave up and went back to Mexico - and on December 9, General Gates made a fateful decision. He assaulted the city fortifications, knowing they were still well manned and mostly intact.

The battles swirled for over a month. Finally Gates conceded defeat with nearly seventeen thousand wounded and killed, the worst disaster in American history including Washington's loss in 1773.


The siege at Game End


Political Map Jan 1792

Aftermath

After Gates's crushing defeat in January 1792, Congress reluctantly negotiated with the French monarch finally signing a treaty in March.

General Horatio Gates stood court martial for the loss of so many men. Though acquitted of any wrongdoing, he'd never command an army again. He retired to Virginia, freed his slaves, then moved to New York to live out his life.

As the war raged in 1790, Congress decided the best way to handle the Vermont situation was a plebiscite. Many argued against this, the key point being who would be eligible to vote. Many legislatures, including New York and New Hampshire, distrusted putting so much power in the hands of uneducated, uninterested citizens. As of this weren't bad enough, New York and New Hampshire both flooded the region with new 'residents' to sway the vote. The Green Mountain Boys replied with what amounted to a terror campaign to make them leave.

Voting begain in August 1791 and concluded seven months later in Bennington.

Vermont Plebiscite of 1791-92 said:
Independent State: 12,882
New Hampshire: 6,785
New York: 3,177

The Vermont Republic's Constitution was accepted by Congress almost without change, and Alabama's followed that summer.

Congress just had time to authorize rebuilding of the shattered American army before state legislatures met to appoint delegates for the next presidency. Washington's apparent belligerence, which led to so many good men injured at the gates of New Orleans, weighed heavily against him.

More critically, John Adams and his new Federalist party stayed reasonably cohesive. The Democrat-Republicans, led by George Clinton, favored a weaker central government. He did well in North Carolina (tired of suffering European raids), South Carolina, and surprisingly Rhode Island (tired of Adams' belligerent rhetoric.)

Like in 1788, each elector had two votes. The highest vote getter, so long as someone had at least half the total electors (67 in this case), would win with the vice president being the runner up. Logistics problems prevented two Maryland and one Vermont delegate from voting.

Colored by highest vote getter


Presidential Election of 1792 said:
John Adams (F): 91
George Washington: 74
George Clinton (DR): 55
Others: 26

Vice President Washington felt his country no longer needed his guidance, and retired to Mount Vernon in 1794. By the laws of the time Adams didn't have to select a new vice president, so he ran the next two years alone. Washington's retirement set the stage for particularly ugly elections in 1796 and 1800 between two warring parties.

He didn't leave, however, before working with Adams and one of the founders of the Democrat-Republicans, Thomas Jefferson, on a bill of rights. These ten amendments to the Constitution passed Congress in May 1793, and raced through ten of the fifteen states by March 1794.

Bill of Rights

From 1773 through 1792, America fought five wars - six if one includes the Netherlands non-war - to secure their destiny. Adams finished their work peacefully in 1794 by committing Britain to a final withdrawl from lands east of the Mississippi River. The French colony at Yazoo would be purchased by Jefferson along with other French holdings in 1801. Spain sold Florida in 1819. There would be future wars of course, but never again would Americans need to fight for their right to exist or expand. For them, it was only...


The Beginning
 

Lord E

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A very fine AAR, and a good ending although you didn’t manage to fully defeat the French. Still the nation will live on and has secured its place in the world and that was the main goal with the story I think, so good work. It has been a nice story to follow :)
 

unmerged(58610)

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A fine AAR and you survived in style. No by dawn's early light firing squad for your fledgling republic, though Gates undoubtedly dseserved one. It seems thje British did not want Hudson's Bay either. As for the Austrians and Russians; they have a common frontier in Europe, so why not one in the Americas. So the Russians could not quite find Alaska, but the Hudson Bay is just as cold, wet and snow covered and their are all those nice friendly seals who just flock to the beach to be slaughtered.

I wonder how successful you would be running the same scenario in EU3? Still you have Resurrection and Tannenberg to keep you, and us, occupied.
 
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