Victoria 3 - Dev Diary #15 - Slavery

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It’s Thursday again, which means it’s time for another Victoria 3 development diary. Today’s subject of slavery is a rather heavy one, being both one of the most significant political issues of the Victorian era as well a story of untold suffering on a human level. For this reason, before I start getting into the mechanics of slavery I want to briefly explain our philosophy behind its representation in Victoria 3.

Slavery is, obviously, a horrific crime against humanity and precisely for this reason, many games that have a slavery-related setting or mechanics will either leave it out of the game or abstract it into something that’s less ‘on the nose’ (for example by simply applying some form of economic bonus at the expense of decreased stability). For Victoria 3, we don’t think these options work for us for two main reasons.

The first reason is that as I mentioned before, it was an important political issue of the day and was a major catalyst for several significant conflicts, most notably the American Civil War which would be bizarrely contextless if slavery did not play a significant role in the game. The other, and most important reason, is that through our Pop system we are trying to represent every individual human on the planet from 1836, so what statement would we be making if we simply wrote all enslaved individuals out of history, or reduced them into an abstract set of modifiers?

Instead, our aim is to try and represent the institution, systems and causes of slavery, as well as the people who lived under and fought against it, as close to history as we can get it. We simply believe this to be the most respectful way for us to handle this topic, as well as the way that’s most true to the game Victoria 3 aspires to be. With that said, let’s get into the actual mechanics of how slavery and slave pops function in Victoria 3.

As was mentioned in the Employment and Qualifications dev diary, slaves are what Victoria 2 would have called a ‘Pop Type‘ and Victoria 3 calls a ‘Profession‘, but function in a significantly different way from other Pops. For one, slaves do not get hired with the enticement of a wage and do not have the freedom to choose the place they work. Slaves also aren’t just able to stop being slaves by switching their Profession to one that does offer a wage and freedom of movement.

These Slaves are given the bare minimum of goods not to starve, resulting in a very slight population increase over time but a generally miserable existence for the people that make up the Pop
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Buildings that ‘employ’ slaves also do so in a way that differs from the way they employ other Professions. The gist of how this works is that in a state that has slaves, certain buildings (for example plantations) that employ laborers or peasants can fill each available position for those Professions with either a laborer/peasant or a slave. As an example, a Cotton Plantation in a slave state that has the capacity to employ 4000 laborers could fill that capacity with 2240 slaves and 1760 laborers, 4000 laborers and 0 slaves, or any other combination of the two less or equal to 4000. Generally buildings will prefer acquiring slaves over hiring free laborers whenever possible for the economic benefits it brings.

So what are those economic benefits? Well, first, it should be understood that said economic benefits are mostly for the owners of the building, meaning a bunch of wealthy aristocrats in the case of Cotton Plantations. Instead of paying wages, each building decides a standard of living based on factors such as laws and profitability and purchases the ‘necessary’ goods for that target standard of living. This target SoL may not always be at the level of outright starvation but is never going to be anything but a very basic existence.

The cost to purchase said goods is simply added as a building expense and is virtually always going to be cheaper than employing paid labor, which translates into lower costs, higher profits and increased dividends for the building owners. Slaves also do not pay taxes in any form, so if the government wants to convert those profits into revenue, they have to do so through the various forms of wealth-based taxes that are always going to be deeply unpopular with the powerful elite.

These Tobacco plantations on Cuba have fully replaced the usual Laborer workforce with Slaves instead, leading to greater wealth for the Aristocrats
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However, there is one economic advantage to slavery that goes a little beyond just enriching aristocrats: Slave pops have a higher ratio of workforce to dependents than other pops, meaning that a population of 100k slaves can supply the labor needs of a greater number of buildings than a population of 100k laborers. The key thing here is of course that not all buildings can utilize slaves, so this isn’t going to be doing any good for an industrialized manufacturing economy, but a country that aims to keep its economy agriculture/plantation-focused and suffers from a labor shortage may find the brutal economics of slavery to work in its favor, if they’re willing to stomach the human cost and stamp down on any resistance.

So what of that resistance? Well, given that slavery is founded entirely on human misery, slaves are naturally not going to be content with their lot in life, and will attempt to resist by whatever means are available to them. Mechanically this translates into a steady stream of radicalized slaves and the threat of turmoil and slave uprisings. This threat to a slave society can usually be averted with sufficiently repressive measures, but fear and violence is not a good foundation for a completely stable country.

Of course, resistance to slavery doesn’t just come from the slaves themselves, but also from Abolitionists, both internally in your country (in the form of characters and Interest Groups with the Abolitionist ideology) and externally in the form of Abolitionist-led countries that may hinder or put pressure on slave regimes that aren’t strong enough to resist them. The most notable historical example here being Britain and its naval efforts to stamp out the trans-atlantic slave trade in the 19th century.

With the explanation out of the way, let’s talk about slavery laws. These are what govern who (if anyone) is enslaved or emancipated and where (if anywhere) slavery can exist in your country. They are as follows:

Slavery Abolished: The law that most countries with advanced economies start with. Under this law, slavery is completely illegal and on its passage any slave pops in the country are immediately emancipated and converted into laborers. If a country with this law comes into possession of land where slaves are living, said slaves are also immediately emancipated as above.

Debt Slavery: This law is meant to represent traditional systems of generally debt-based slavery, present in a number of economically less advanced and/or decentralized countries. Under Debt Slavery, Pops of low Wealth levels will gradually create a trickle of new slaves (with poorer pops converting into slaves at a higher rate), as individuals sell themselves or others into slavery for economic reasons such as debt repayment. However, under this system, children born to slaves are born free, so slave populations will not grow by themselves.

Slave Trade: This law is meant to represent the kind of widespread chattel slavery practised in places such as Brazil and Cuba. Under Slave Trade, the children of slaves are born as slaves and new slaves can also be imported from abroad. We’ll not go over exactly how slave import works today, but the gist of it is that slaves can be imported from decentralized countries that practice slavery if the importer has an established Interest in the region (more on Interests at a later point).

Legacy Slavery: This law is meant to represent countries that have made slave trade illegal but not abolished it altogether, most notably the United States of America. Under Legacy Slavery, the country is divided into Free States and Slave States. In Free States, slavery is illegal and everything functions exactly as if the country had the Slavery Abolished law, while Slave States function as though they had the Slave Trade law with the notable exception that new slaves cannot be imported from abroad. Under this law, slaves also tend to have a slightly higher standard of living for the simple reason that a starving slave population isn’t demographically sustainable. This law also plays an important role in how the American Civil War functions in the game, but that’s a topic for a later dev diary.

The United States starts the game with the Legacy Slavery law. Surely, nothing will go wrong if they start trying to abolish it right away?
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Since slavery laws function just like any other laws, it is possible for them to change in different ways: a country with Slave Trade may follow the US example and change to Legacy Slavery as a compromise alternative to abolishing it altogether, and a country that has fully abolished slavery can even try to bring it back. Given that no country in history actually re-legalized chattel slavery after abolishing it, this is very difficult to do (once abolished there will generally be a strong anti-slavery bastion in a country that aren’t going to look kindly on such proposals). Of course, trying to abolish slavery isn’t likely to happen without resistance either - those wealthy aristocrats who benefit from it have a vested interest in defending it, after all.

Lyman Beecher, leader of the Devout Interest Group in the United States, is an ardent opponent of slavery

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On that note, we’ve reached the end of this dev diary, though we’ll return a bit to this topic in the future when we talk about diplomacy (which isn’t that far away now!). Next week we’re going to go over the system of States and their related mechanics such as State Regions, Split States and Turmoil.
 
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lachek

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Al-Khalidi said:
Omg it's so amazing that diplomacy is near, I was dying to see it! :D
Just one question about slaves: I see proposed mechanics very well portrays laws and functioning of slaves in the new world. How about islamic world? Slavery was very widespread there, and slaves should perhaps be mostly treated as servants in wealthy houses.
Also, will Ottomans have slavery? In vic2 they had it abolished which I think isn't entirely historically accurate, as slave trade was present in Ottoman Empire at least till 50s, and slavery was functioning somehow in fact till the collapse of empire... Which slavery law category would Ottomans get?
Islamic countries are a mixed bag, some have Debt Slavery, some have Slave Trade, some have banned Slavery.
The Ottoman Empire starts with Slave Trade.

Spartakusbund said:
Will there be an internal slave trade in Legacy Slavery countries? Will slaves have a price? I think this would help to capture a lot of dynamics around the expansion of slavery. Virginia plantation owners whose soil had mostly depleted (I know that isn’t a mechanic in game) had a strong economic interest in expansion because it kept the price of slaves high and thus allowed them to maintain their lifestyle by selling slaves to Planters on fresh cotton soil.
There will not be an internal slave trade system, at least not at launch. It is something we really do want to add in, because as you say it is an important dynamic to consider when trying to fully deconstruct the economic beneficiaries and political support for the institution of slavery. But it's one thing to represent that there is a slave trade going on through moving people around the world in response to laws and economic demand, and a whole other quagmire to actually represent people with price tags on them - in an economics-focused game - in a way that doesn't trivialize the topic. So we might go there eventually if we can find a good way to represent it, but for the moment we've accepted not being able to model this.

EntropyAvatar said:
Can a country allow slavery in it's colonies but ban it in it's incorporated states?
The way this is modeled is via subject relationships, for example via Spain and Cuba. Slavery is outlawed in Spain but permitted in Cuba, which is a colonial subject of Spain.

Cpt.Cross said:
What roles can Slave pops fill? I notice in the image they can be laborers, but why does it not show an option to replace them as farmers too?
"Farmers" in Victoria 3 are Pops who have an expertise in growing crops, caring for cattle, and running a farm. Pops who do manual labor on a farm, harvesting and such, are either considered Laborers or Peasants. Both of those can be replaced by Slaves in countries where this is allowed.

To also answer an adjacent question, this is moddable - building types can decide which, if any, Profession it can use Slaves for. So while this is something we likely won't do in vanilla, it should be possible to mod in that the Clerk Profession in Urban Centers could also be carried out by Slaves, for example.

blobmaneatsme said:
can slavery laws act as casus belli for countries that have abolished it?

for example the uk invading a country to change their slave laws from slave trade to abolished?
Exactly.

MohawkWolfo98 said:
When we abolish slavery, would there be other consequences from this, say from the rich aristocrats, if u are not playing as the USA and this won’t have the civil war for example?
There is systemic fallout from banning Slavery for any country in which Landowners have gotten rich off it, and any country could potentially have a civil war around this issue. The American Civil War specifically has some more aspects to it, both in terms of flavor and mechanics. But a slavery-related civil war could happen anywhere or nowhere in a given playthrough.

On Serfdom:
Serfdom is modeled as a Labor Law for two reasons. First, it should be possible to have both Slavery and/or Serfdom. One should not be modeled as a "progression" of the other - it would make no sense for the United States to abolish Legacy Slavery in favor of Serfdom, and then everybody clapped. But we also don't want to have 6 different Slavery Laws, "Debt Slavery + Serfdom", "Slave Trade + Serfdom", etc. On the other hand, Serfdom is a progression in Labor Law. It's hard to imagine a country in which there are safety regulations to protect workers from being exploited in mines and factories, while some people are inherently tied to land.

Secondly, Serfdom and Slavery are two quite different beasts under our definitions. Serfs are Peasants tied to the land, and that land is owned by Aristocrats. They have limited mobility and income opportunities, and are forced to work hard for the benefit of their lord. This translates mechanically into a system where Peasants have lower Standard of Living and cannot easily promote to fill new positions in an industrializing society. Slaves, meanwhile, are people that are considered legal property directly. They have zero mobility and no economic self-governance at all, with their needs supplied at the whim of their owners. They also differ in that Slaves must be Discriminated populations, while Peasants do not have to be.

Mechanically both systems are represented, and they serve similar but fundamentally different roles.

Palna Thoke said:
Can a debt slave be sold to somewhere with Slave Trade?
In brief - and to also answer all the questions about "who would be enslaved if I instituted Slavery in my nation that started without it" - this is exactly how Slaves enter your country under Slave Trade, yes. Slaves only come into existence through Debt Slavery and the natural Pop Growth of Slaves under Slave Trade. If a country has no Slaves, and pass Slave Trade, they will start importing Slaves from countries with Debt Slavery.

Niko92 said:
If you abolish slavery, how will the former slave POPs act? Will it be difficult for them to gather wealth and reach the SoL levels of non-slaved POPs like what happened in the US?
They will likely remain Discriminated status on account of their heritage, and they will not have accumulated the same level of Qualifications as the rest of the Pops in the country while they were Slaves. So yes, they will almost certainly continue to be substantially worse off than non-discriminated Pops for a long time, especially until such time the country reforms their Discrimination laws.

AliceInDystopialand said:
I have a question about that last sentence. Does this also apply to debt slavery? Since debt slavery represents poor people in a society selling themselves into slavery, I'm not sure it quite makes sense for them to need to be part of a particular population to become enslaved. Or does that just mean that once they've become slaves, they become a discriminated population?
No you are right! Debt Slavery can enslave anyone regardless of Discrimination status. Discrimination matters for the importation of Slaves under Slave Trade, which tends to lead to countries with Slave Trade having large quantities of Slaves that are also Discriminated.

FranklyJustNess said:
How is abolishing slavery handled when it is enforced as a peace deal demand? On one hand it feels wrong if you entered a civil war because you abolished it when having no choice, but on the other it opens the possibility of agreeing to abolish it in peace deal just because you actually want to.
It will anger all IGs that would have been angered by abolishing it through normal legislative means, which may very well lead to a civil war to bring back slavery (where the country that forced them to abolish it might have to intervene to keep slavery banned).

Don_Quigleone said:
1. Do countries with the "slave trade" law also accumulate slaves the way countries with "debt slavery" laws do? Or are the two methods of gaining slaves exclusive?
They're exclusive.
Don_Quigleone said:
2. What determines when an enslaved pop moves from 1 state/building to another, be it domestically or internationally? How do I prevent all my own slaves from being shipped overseas, or alternatively, how do I increase the number of slaves that are being imported?
Buildings that has enough room to purchase Slaves will first try to draw from Slave populations local to the state. If none qualify, and the country has Slave Trade, they can cause a transfer of Slave populations from a country with Debt Slavery in a region where they have an Interest, which is something we'll talk about another time.

Jia Xu said:
Victoria 2 was quite strange in that slavery was limited to representing just the transatlantic slave trade (as far as I remember). You guys say you want to do this crime against humanity justice but there's no mention of the slave trades of Africa and Asia. If these slaves are absent (again) then have you not erased their suffering from history? I'm trying to say this in the least disrespectful way as possible. Please clarify the situation. Thanks.

Indeed, if one was to pick up worldwide abolitionism as a goal, then this should be a truly massive project in Vicky 3. It should be much more than just abolishing slavery in the U.S. and Brazil.
As mentioned a bit upstreams, plenty of countries start out with Slave Trade or Debt Slavery, far from just the US and Brazil.

Vernichtere said:
What I find more interesting is that the economic consequences will contradict the statements in the DD. IM DD it is said that one can take advantage of slavery if one wants to be an agrarian state.

But that is not true and historically it was not true either. A kind of symbiosis develops that can only be broken by political rejection. The use of slaves displaces the peasants into the cities. Where to use them in the factories.

I am pretty sure that I will not industrialize more slowly with Sweden, for example, if I introduce slavery there. But I will get politically in relation to the introduction of a number of laws and a strong land-ruling class that will block a number of reforms for me.
You're not wrong! Our statement in the DD does apply mostly to countries where a sizeable part of the population are already Slaves, and where there is plenty of Arable Land on which to expand Plantations. If you already have a large workforce and you institute Slavery, you are correct that any newly imported Slaves would just occupy those menial jobs the domestic population would prefer not to do anyway.
 
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We know this is a sensitive topic, so Fair warning that Trolling and/or toxic comments will not be tolerated. Keep all comments related to the game mechanic
Think before posting.
 
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You mentioned Britain's naval efforts to stamp out the slave trade and mentioned the slave trade itself as being something featured in the game, so does this mean we can partake in stamping out the slave trade through decisions or military actions ourselves?
 
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Given that no country in history actually re-legalized chattel slavery after abolishing it,

Is this true? I thought France did this. The Republic banned slavery in France's Caribbean colonies, but the Empire brought back slavery.
 
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Very interesting dev diary, thank you.
 
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It’s Thursday again, which means it’s time for another Victoria 3 development diary. Today’s subject of slavery is a rather heavy one, being both one of the most significant political issues of the Victorian era as well a story of untold suffering on a human level. For this reason, before I start getting into the mechanics of slavery I want to briefly explain our philosophy behind its representation in Victoria 3.

Slavery is, obviously, a horrific crime against humanity and precisely for this reason, many games that have a slavery-related setting or mechanics will either leave it out of the game or abstract it into something that’s less ‘on the nose’ (for example by simply applying some form of economic bonus at the expense of decreased stability). For Victoria 3, we don’t think these options work for us for two main reasons.

The first reason is that as I mentioned before, it was an important political issue of the day and was a major catalyst for several significant conflicts, most notably the American Civil War which would be bizarrely contextless if slavery did not play a significant role in the game. The other, and most important reason, is that through our Pop system we are trying to represent every individual human on the planet from 1836, so what statement would we be making if we simply wrote all enslaved individuals out of history, or reduced them into an abstract set of modifiers?

Instead, our aim is to try and represent the institution, systems and causes of slavery, as well as the people who lived under and fought against it, as close to history as we can get it. We simply believe this to be the most respectful way for us to handle this topic, as well as the way that’s most true to the game Victoria 3 aspires to be. With that said, let’s get into the actual mechanics of how slavery and slave pops function in Victoria 3.

As was mentioned in the Employment and Qualifications dev diary, slaves are what Victoria 2 would have called a ‘Pop Type‘ and Victoria 3 calls a ‘Profession‘, but function in a significantly different way from other Pops. For one, slaves do not get hired with the enticement of a wage and do not have the freedom to choose the place they work. Slaves also aren’t just able to stop being slaves by switching their Profession to one that does offer a wage and freedom of movement.

These Slaves are given the bare minimum of goods not to starve, resulting in a very slight population increase over time but a generally miserable existence for the people that make up the Pop
View attachment 756677

Buildings that ‘employ’ slaves also do so in a way that differs from the way they employ other Professions. The gist of how this works is that in a state that has slaves, certain buildings (for example plantations) that employ laborers or peasants can fill each available position for those Professions with either a laborer/peasant or a slave. As an example, a Cotton Plantation in a slave state that has the capacity to employ 4000 laborers could fill that capacity with 2240 slaves and 1760 laborers, 4000 laborers and 0 slaves, or any other combination of the two less or equal to 4000. Generally buildings will prefer acquiring slaves over hiring free laborers whenever possible for the economic benefits it brings.

So what are those economic benefits? Well, first, it should be understood that said economic benefits are mostly for the owners of the building, meaning a bunch of wealthy aristocrats in the case of Cotton Plantations. Instead of paying wages, each building decides a standard of living based on factors such as laws and profitability and purchases the ‘necessary’ goods for that target standard of living. This target SoL may not always be at the level of outright starvation but is never going to be anything but a very basic existence.

The cost to purchase said goods is simply added as a building expense and is virtually always going to be cheaper than employing paid labor, which translates into lower costs, higher profits and increased dividends for the building owners. Slaves also do not pay taxes in any form, so if the government wants to convert those profits into revenue, they have to do so through the various forms of wealth-based taxes that are always going to be deeply unpopular with the powerful elite.

These Tobacco plantations on Cuba have fully replaced the usual Laborer workforce with Slaves instead, leading to greater wealth for the Aristocrats
View attachment 756678

However, there is one economic advantage to slavery that goes a little beyond just enriching aristocrats: Slave pops have a higher ratio of workforce to dependents than other pops, meaning that a population of 100k slaves can supply the labor needs of a greater number of buildings than a population of 100k laborers. The key thing here is of course that not all buildings can utilize slaves, so this isn’t going to be doing any good for an industrialized manufacturing economy, but a country that aims to keep its economy agriculture/plantation-focused and suffers from a labor shortage may find the brutal economics of slavery to work in its favor, if they’re willing to stomach the human cost and stamp down on any resistance.

So what of that resistance? Well, given that slavery is founded entirely on human misery, slaves are naturally not going to be content with their lot in life, and will attempt to resist by whatever means are available to them. Mechanically this translates into a steady stream of radicalized slaves and the threat of turmoil and slave uprisings. This threat to a slave society can usually be averted with sufficiently repressive measures, but fear and violence is not a good foundation for a completely stable country.

Of course, resistance to slavery doesn’t just come from the slaves themselves, but also from Abolitionists, both internally in your country (in the form of characters and Interest Groups with the Abolitionist ideology) and externally in the form of Abolitionist-led countries that may hinder or put pressure on slave regimes that aren’t strong enough to resist them. The most notable historical example here being Britain and its naval efforts to stamp out the trans-atlantic slave trade in the 19th century.

With the explanation out of the way, let’s talk about slavery laws. These are what govern who (if anyone) is enslaved or emancipated and where (if anywhere) slavery can exist in your country. They are as follows:

Slavery Abolished: The law that most countries with advanced economies start with. Under this law, slavery is completely illegal and on its passage any slave pops in the country are immediately emancipated and converted into laborers. If a country with this law comes into possession of land where slaves are living, said slaves are also immediately emancipated as above.

Debt Slavery: This law is meant to represent traditional systems of generally debt-based slavery, present in a number of economically less advanced and/or decentralized countries. Under Debt Slavery, Pops of low Wealth levels will gradually create a trickle of new slaves (with poorer pops converting into slaves at a higher rate), as individuals sell themselves or others into slavery for economic reasons such as debt repayment. However, under this system, children born to slaves are born free, so slave populations will not grow by themselves.

Slave Trade: This law is meant to represent the kind of widespread chattel slavery practised in places such as Brazil and Cuba. Under Slave Trade, the children of slaves are born as slaves and new slaves can also be imported from abroad. We’ll not go over exactly how slave import works today, but the gist of it is that slaves can be imported from decentralized countries that practice slavery if the importer has an established Interest in the region (more on Interests at a later point).

Legacy Slavery: This law is meant to represent countries that have made slave trade illegal but not abolished it altogether, most notably the United States of America. Under Legacy Slavery, the country is divided into Free States and Slave States. In Free States, slavery is illegal and everything functions exactly as if the country had the Slavery Abolished law, while Slave States function as though they had the Slave Trade law with the notable exception that new slaves cannot be imported from abroad. Under this law, slaves also tend to have a slightly higher standard of living for the simple reason that a starving slave population isn’t demographically sustainable. This law also plays an important role in how the American Civil War functions in the game, but that’s a topic for a later dev diary.

The United States starts the game with the Legacy Slavery law. Surely, nothing will go wrong if they start trying to abolish it right away?
View attachment 756679

Since slavery laws function just like any other laws, it is possible for them to change in different ways: a country with Slave Trade may follow the US example and change to Legacy Slavery as a compromise alternative to abolishing it altogether, and a country that has fully abolished slavery can even try to bring it back. Given that no country in history actually re-legalized chattel slavery after abolishing it, this is very difficult to do (once abolished there will generally be a strong anti-slavery bastion in a country that aren’t going to look kindly on such proposals). Of course, trying to abolish slavery isn’t likely to happen without resistance either - those wealthy aristocrats who benefit from it have a vested interest in defending it, after all.

Lyman Beecher, leader of the Devout Interest Group in the United States, is an ardent opponent of slavery

View attachment 756680
On that note, we’ve reached the end of this dev diary, though we’ll return a bit to this topic in the future when we talk about diplomacy (which isn’t that far away now!). Next week we’re going to go over the system of States and their related mechanics such as State Regions, Split States and Turmoil.
Omg it's so amazing that diplomacy is near, I was dying to see it! :D
Just one question about slaves: I see proposed mechanics very well portrays laws and functioning of slaves in the new world. How about islamic world? Slavery was very widespread there, and slaves should perhaps be mostly treated as servants in wealthy houses.
Also, will Ottomans have slavery? In vic2 they had it abolished which I think isn't entirely historically accurate, as slave trade was present in Ottoman Empire at least till 50s, and slavery was functioning somehow in fact till the collapse of empire... Which slavery law category would Ottomans get?
 
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You could change or add what pops are slaved? For instance a country with slaves conquest another with a different culture and decide to slave the local population.
 
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Will there be an internal slave trade in Legacy Slavery countries? Will slaves have a price? I think this would help to capture a lot of dynamics around the expansion of slavery. Virginia plantation owners whose soil had mostly depleted (I know that isn’t a mechanic in game) had a strong economic interest in expansion because it kept the price of slaves high and thus allowed them to maintain their lifestyle by selling slaves to Planters on fresh cotton soil.
 
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Is slavery something that, usually, disappears by the end of a game amongst the AI? Or is it possible that nations could retain the horrible institution (or even go back to it)?

I'm wondering what the AI, on average, does with the slavery.
 
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This seems quite a fine way to portray slavery! Realistic.

Wonder if serfdom gets similar mechanics?

And wonder if we can commission our own West Africa Squadron?
 
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Will Peonage which was present in countries such as Russia be represented by debt slavery? How does this differ to the other slave types with regards to jobs?
 
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An important topic. Some questions.

1.) I know Serfdom isn't quite slavery but they are similar, I am curious what makes Slavery and Serfdom different mechanically for vicky3?
2.) If the slaves in the US do revolt what happens? Do they form a new country, ala Haiti, a civil war, rebels?
3.) Does Legacy Slavery have the Internal slave trade?
 
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The new part will not be the same as it was in the second part? And specifically, that the Communists sought to introduce slavery in the country because of the specifics of the laws prescribed by them? After all, Communists have never sought slavery in society. And will the fascist regimes do the same? Also, will it be possible to introduce slavery where it was not at the official level? (Example: Russia, Prussia, Austria)
В новой часть не будет такого же, как во второй части? И конкретно, что коммунисты стремились ввести рабство в стране из-за специфики предписанных ими законов? В конце концов, коммунисты никогда не стремились к рабству в обществе. И будут ли фашистские режимы делать то же самое? Кроме того, можно ли будет ввести рабство там, где его не было на официальном уровне? (Пример: Россия, Пруссия, Австрия)