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Thread: In den Augen Gottes: An Alternative History Affair

  1. #1
    Alternative Affairs Specialist TekcoR's Avatar
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    In den Augen Gottes: An Alternative History Affair

    In den Augen Gottes
    An Alternative History Affair
    By TekcoR

    Table of Contents

    Chapter 1
    From the Ashes
    Rising Dawn
    Eagles in the Sky
    One Mistake, One Success
    Clash of Titans

    Chapter 2
    Exile
    Return
    Elba to Helena

    Chapter 3 (1836-1840)
    Return from Isolation
    Guidelines to Prosperity
    Rails across the Land

    Chapter 4 (January 1841- May 1844)
    A New Wind
    An Alarming Trend
    An Unthinkable Event
    At Long Last!

    Chapter 5 (June 1844 - December 1845)
    A Splendid Diversion
    Patience and Resolve

    Chapter 6 (January 1846 - October 1850 )
    Animal House
    Outbreak
    The Diagnosis Worsen
    Radical Response
    A Cure!

    Chapter 7 (October 1850 - December 1855)
    To the East
    Across the Seas
    Last edited by TekcoR; 20-10-2011 at 05:14.
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    Reserved.
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  3. #3
    Captain NoMoreSanity's Avatar
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    *Tries to spot changes*

    Hmm, I see Prussia still has Warsaw, and in fact the entire of Poland post first partition is still in the same hands before the Napoleonic Wars. And I can spot a possibly free Finland up there as well... No Luxembourg as well, unless it's too small for me to see. Norway's a satellite as well, though that might be the mod you're using instead of whatever alt-history you've cooked up now.

    Color me intrigued. Can't wait to read this, considering your usual level of quality.

  4. #4
    Lt. General Aliasing's Avatar
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    Oh interesting.

  5. #5
    Very interesting...!

    Tim

  6. #6
    Alternative Affairs Specialist TekcoR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NoMoreSanity View Post
    *Tries to spot changes*

    Hmm, I see Prussia still has Warsaw, and in fact the entire of Poland post first partition is still in the same hands before the Napoleonic Wars. And I can spot a possibly free Finland up there as well... No Luxembourg as well, unless it's too small for me to see. Norway's a satellite as well, though that might be the mod you're using instead of whatever alt-history you've cooked up now.

    Color me intrigued. Can't wait to read this, considering your usual level of quality.
    This is based off the latest version of PDM at the time 4.2.7. Belgium owns Luxembourg until 1839-ish. Norway is a satelite of Sweden. Finland is a satelite of Russia also if I believe correctly.

    There will more like be some additional changes; it is just a matter of properly researching them and making them plausible.
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  7. #7
    Alternative Affairs Specialist TekcoR's Avatar
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    In den Augen Gottes
    An Alternative History Affair
    By TekcoR

    Chapter 1
    From the Ashes


    The Kingdom of Prussia, after its defeat at the hands of Napoleon in 1806-1808.

    In the aftermath of the disasters of Jena and Auerstadt, the Kingdom of Prussia had stooped to a new low point in history. In the month of December, 1806 King Frederick William III and the beautiful Queen Luise fled eastwards from advancing armies of the Emperor Napoleon, they were forced to stop in a small East Prussian town where there was no food or clean water to be spared. In miserable sleeping quarters of a “wretched barn that they call a house” Frederick William III had the chance to reflect at length of the meaning and scale of the Prussian defeat. After the battles of Jena and Auerstadt, numerous fortresses had collapsed under questionable circumstances. Stettin, which had recently been fully provisioned, surrendered to 800 French Hussars; though the garrison was around 5,000 strong. Days after the royal entourage fled from Kurstin the fortress surrendered. The collapse of Prussia had become much more than just a militarily collapse, but a question about the political structure that had been established.

    The king’s rage over the continuous chain of capitulations found itself manifested in the Declaration of Ortelsburg written on December 12th, 1806. In the declaration, the King penned that it was still too early to draw conclusions about who was responsible for the near total dissolution of the Prussian forces in the fields; the fortresses capitulations were a scandal without precedent that caused further stain upon Prussia’s pride. Henceforth, any governor or commander who surrendered his fortress for the fear of bombardment or any other worthless reason, whatever it might be would be shot without mercy. Any soldier who willingly threw away his weapons out of fear or for his own survival would face the firing squad. Subjects who entered the service of the enemy and were found willingly aiding them – with weapon in hand – would again be shot without mercy. Through the tirades a brief mention of a reform was announced: “any fighting man who performed with distinction should be promoted into the officer corps, regardless of whether he was a private, a warrant officer or a prince.

    While political reform was headed by the ministers Karl vom Stein (Chief Adviser); Alexander Count Dohna and Karl von Altenstein (Joint Chief Ministers), the military reform was spearheaded by a south German colonel who had entered Prussian service in 1782 at the age of twenty-four. Christian von Massenbach who was an adjutant and military theorist of the campaigns of Napoleon argued for the professionalization of the military leadership and planning – stating that the fate of the kingdom should not rest on whether the monarch was a gifted strategist. There were parallels between Massenbach’s call for command functions being concentrated in one decision making organ and the modern day general staff system.

    One of the most significant reforms of the Prussian military was proposed by a dominant figure in the Military Society (founded 1802), where officers would read papers and discussed the implications of such papers for Prussia. Gerhard Johann David von Scharnhorst, of peasant birth who swiftly rose through Hanover’s army before joining Prussian service in 1801, called for the introduction of the divisional system witnessed within Napoleon’s army. In addition, Scharnhorst called for the establishment of a territorial militia as a reserve force. Scharnhorst was aided by a quartet of gifted associates – August Wilhelm Neidhardt von Gneisenau, Herman von Boyen, Karl Wilhelm Georg von Grolman and Karl von Clausewitz. Gneisenau had been in command of the fortress of Kolberg had managed to hold out against French forces until July 2nd, 1807. Similar to Gneisenau, Grolman had the fortune of being associated with continued Prussian resistance fighting in the L’Estocq Corps – which fought against the French with the Russians. Lastly there was Clausewitz, the youngest of the group - having joined the army as a 12 year old cadet, was 26 years old in 1806, and had been previously selected for the Institute of Young Officers in Berlin; which was commanded by Scharnhorst at the time.

    The reforms proposed by the selected members included a greater emphasis on the deployment of flexible units of riflemen; additional crucial improvements in training, tactics and weaponry; meritocratic appointments of officers (In 1806 there was 208 officers in the Prussian Army. Of 142 generals, 17 were dismissed, 86 received honorable discharged. Only a quarter of the officer corps survived the purge.) In addition to the improvements, universal military service was to become the norm – the old Prussian exemptions out of the army were to be dismantled – those who were not called up directly into the army would be liable for service in the territorial militia. Lastly, there was a phasing out period of the draconian corporal punishments for disciplinary infractions, because the general consensus among the group was that it interfered with dignity of the recruits. Instead, it was the job of the officer no to beat or insult his men, but rather to educate them.

    These reforms would play a crucial part in the later part of the Napoleonic Wars, when in 1809 – though not fully implemented – due to resistance from long service members as Field Marshal Mollendorf (distinguished service during Seven Years War) – would help propel Prussia back into the European spotlight as a power to be had on one’s side.
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  9. #9
    Alternative Affairs Specialist TekcoR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hydroloc View Post
    Subscribed

    Nice BTW
    Thanks. The first few posts will be rather loaded with information, and should be quite a good read for those inclined in facts. The general idea of the AAR, at this point will try to be paint Prussia in a different picture than most people think of in real life.
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  10. #10
    Alternative Affairs Specialist TekcoR's Avatar
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    In den Augen Gottes
    An Alternative History Affair
    By TekcoR

    Chapter 1
    Rising Dawn

    In the spring of 1809, the common consensus throughout Europe was that the height of Napoleon’s power had been reached. Bands of freedom fighters and other various resistance movements by the people of Spain against the occupying French armies brought wave of encouragement to the capitals of Berlin, Vienna, London and St. Petersburg. In mid-April 1809 came reports that Emperor Francis I of Austria had been instilled into action by news of Joseph Bonaparte being installed upon the Bourbon throne of Spain and had gone to war against Napoleon. News of the declaration of war against caused a massive uprising in Bavarian controlled Tyrol – which had been ceded to them four years prior. To reflect the mood of the nation of Prussia, Provincial President Johann August Sack reported: “The general mood is that now or never is the moment when salvation from dependence and subjection is possible.

    Frederick William III was confronted with near impossible choices. Vienna was pressing for Prussia support and urging that the two states coordinate their military planning and request additional assistance from Tsar Alexander I of Russia. Paris sent a hurried reminder that under the terms of the Franco-Prussian treaty signed September 8th, 1808, Prussia was obliged to support France with an auxiliary corps of at least 12,000 men. Frederick William III proceeded with caution and said it was best to “sit tight” and let the events play out.

    However, rumors were spreading throughout the circles of the Prussian establishment at court and throughout the country of an elaborate plan to replace the King with his more energetic younger brother William. Those figures pressing for war was a list of whose who within the administration, the military reformers of August Wilhelm Neidhardt von Gneisenau, Herman von Boyen, Karl Wilhelm Georg von Grolman and Karl von Clausewitz, all called for an alliance between Austria and Russia. In addition to the reformers, the Foreign Minister August Friedrich Ferdinand von der Goltz and the Minister of Justice Karl Friedrich Beyme called for an alliance. Faced with mounting internal and external pressure, along with the possibility of losing his crown, Frederick William III agreed to the establishment of an alliance with Emperor Francis I on April 27th, 1809.

    The news of the alliance with Austria was further spurred by newspaper reports that a Prussian officer, later identified as Major Ferdinand von Schill, had led his regiment out of Berlin towards the Kingdom of Westphalia to begin an insurrection against the Bonaparte-regime. Schill was a shining example of man learned in the tactics of guerrilla warfare. In 1806, he had commanded a corps of volunteers that carried out raids against the French supply lines in the area surrounding Kolberg (which helped Gneisenau have the fortress survive until July 2nd, 1807). Following a promotion to Captain in January 1807, he was entrusted by the king to establish a free corps – that ended up being successful in harassing French supply lines until the Peace of Tilsit was signed July 9th, 1807. With his free corps dissolved after the treaty, Schill was promoted to major and awarded the Pour le Merite – the highest decoration for bravery. With the looming war with Napoleon, Major Schill would once again be called upon to form a free corps.

    Major Schill would not be the only important figure within the Prussian insurrection against Napoleon. Gneisenau had established several detailed plans calling for a popular partisan war in the Spanish manner that would be used against the French Army. The mass uprising (Aufstand in Masse) would be directed to harry French units, disrupt supply routes, destroy supplies that would otherwise fall into enemy hands and report on troop movements to the regular army. There was a question of how to best instill the general populace into the movement, Gneisenau suggested that the use of clergymen to mobilize their local communities; while his like-minded reformers (Scharnhorst, Boyen, Grolman and Clausewitz) proposed that clear leadership from the monarch was essential. Until the formal alliance with Austria, King Frederick William III was unwilling to lend his support to the partisan idea – though once the document had been signed, the king quickly lent his power behind the partisans.

    Prussia, which had suffered humiliating defeats over two and a half years ago in the fall of 1806, was again preparing for war to redeem itself against its greatest nemesis to date. The Kingdom of 1806 was not like the Kingdom of 1809. Yet in both cases, as in 1806 and 1809 Prussia was hastily heading off for war against a superior foe.
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  11. #11
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    In den Augen Gottes
    An Alternative History Affair
    By TekcoR

    Chapter 1
    Eagles in the Sky

    In the first week of the war, starting on April 10th, 1809, the elements of the Austrian Army crossed the river Inn over bad roads and harassed by freezing rain. The Austrians; which had performed a series of reforms since their defeats in 1805 by the signing of the Treaty of Pressburg, were advancing against the French ally of Bavaria – though with occasional problems. Charles, the brother of the Emperor of Austria had been offered the crown by Napoleon, but declined the throne as he was allowed to lead the reforms of the Austrian army. One of the first steps was to vanquish the four companies per battalion model which had been introduced in 1805 – and return to the six companies per. In addition, the adoption of skirmishers and additional cavalry as a force was adopted on the style of the French. However; numerous of the commanders within the Austrian army refused to follow these practices unless Charles was present.

    Although the Austrians lacked adequate skirmishers, cavalry and overall experienced troops – Austria had recently adopted a levee en masse system and was thus faced with an overwhelming amount of relatively inexperienced troops and officers – she continued to advance. Initially the attack called for four separate corps, I. Corps (38,000 – Bohemia); II. Corps (20,000 – Regensburg); III. IV., and I. Reserve Corps (66,000) and V., VI., and II. Reserve Corps (61,000) soldiers to advance towards a primary objective in Bavaria. With the announcement that Prussia would begin joining forces with the Austrians, the campaign plans were modified to allow for the regular armies of the forces to combine.

    Prussia’s armed forces, while not as numerous as the 185,000 Austrians, the Prussians would provide an ample force in divided between three corps. The I. Corps was to be 70,000 strong and lead by General Blucher; the II. Corps was to be a reserve force of 38,000 commanded by Scharnhorst, with a 22,000 strong III. Corps led by Gneisenau. The objective of Blucher and Scharnhorst was to rendezvous with the Austrian forces near city of Dresden, within the Kingdom of Saxony. Meanwhile, the small corps lead by Gneisenau would be aided by the group of partisans having or being organized within the Napoleonic occupied German Europe. Of major importance to Gneisenau was weakening the largest dominate state within the Confederation of the Rhine – the Bonaparte lead monstrosity known as the Kingdom of Westphalia.

    While the armies of Prussia and Austria were aiming at gathering towards mid-May, France had recovered from the initial shock of the betrayal. Napoleon, who had remained in Paris throughout the winter, issued orders to his commander in Bavaria – who was an incapable commander. As news reached Paris about the setbacks in Bavaria, Napoleon himself resolved to march at the head of the Grand Army; which would number close to 260,000 soldiers to crush Austria and Prussia forever. With actions in central Europe turning hostile, Russia – who had recently been uninterested in renewed hostilities with Napoleon -- agreed to join the coalition against Napoleon, and promised provide an army of 180,000 strong. The combined forces of the Austro-Russo-Prussian forces was to be 495,000 forces against the estimated nearly 300,000 troops of the Grand Army and additional French and Bavarian forces located within the area.

    Britain, who had been at war with France for going on six years, was incapable of providing additional militarily support to the continent – but promised to provide additional subsides for the war efforts; with Prussia and Russia receiving the most substantial amount; while Austria received a meager portion. Though Britain felt the ability to support a substantial force on the continent – in combination of the Allied Army – would prove difficult and beyond a risk the cabinet was willing to take, she was willing to provide commit additional forces to the Iberian front; which was having devastating affects upon French morale.

    The biggest battle in European history was looming. Long had Napoleon terrorized Europe, and finally the nations of Europe had gathered a collective force, had settled their differences in an attempt to tame a monster. The question that everybody asked was: Would they succeed?

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  12. #12
    Alternative Affairs Specialist TekcoR's Avatar
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    In den Augen Gottes
    An Alternative History Affair
    By TekcoR

    Chapter 1
    One Mistake, One Success

    By mid-May, the Austrians had gathered their III. IV., and I. Reserve Corps (66,000) and V., VI., and II. Reserve Corps (61,000) corps to form a strong army of 127,000 strong that would march towards Chemnitz; while I. Corps (38,000); and II. Corps (20,000) would continue to pressure the French ally of Bavaria. Meanwhile, the Prussian Army had been assembled and numbered a plentiful 108,000 troops. The combined force would number 235,000 strong; numerically weaker than the French force of some 260,000 strong that was to be assembled – but a considerable number. Napoleon, who had arrived from Paris by May 13th, had assembled his army and considered it essential to prevent the two armies from gathering. To prevent this, Napoleon split his army into two forces, one would number 140,000 strong – which would be commanded by him and be tasked with defeating the Austrian force; while the second command would have the remaining 120,000 troops and be tasked with delaying the Prussians, until the two French forces could rendezvous after the Austrian’s defeat.

    On June 1st, the battle of Chemnitz would occur between the Austrian army and the French army commanded by Napoleon. The link up between the two Allied armies had been severely delayed due to heavy rains that caused muddy roads and lengthened supply lines. Napoleon’s superior cavalry had caught the Austrian army in poor position, located in a low lying area outside of city and was prepared to press his advantage against the majority of conscripted army. On the horizon, Charles of the Austrian Army barely made out the French flags, and began hurrying his troops into action – but it would be too late. The end result of the Battle of Chemnitz would prove disastrous for the Austrians, who would suffer a substantial 54,000 causalities (31,000 wounded or missing, 14,000 killed, 9,000 captured); while the French would suffer 32,000 causalities (12,000 killed, 20,000 wounded or missing). The Austrians, though caught by surprise had put on a better show than Napoleon had expected.

    The Austrians retreated south to the township of Annaberg-Buchholz, in good order and reassembled their forces. Napoleon had not counted on the high losses inflicted upon him by the conscripts of Austria’s army and the relative resolve they showed of remaining intact after such a devastating blow upon their numbers. Instead of heading north towards Dresden, to rendezvous and intercept the Prussians, Napoleon elected to remain and force another battle with the Austrians that would hopefully force them to vanquish the field in complete disarray.

    On June 3rd, the Prussian force under the overall command of Scharnhorst had spotted the clumsily moving French army under the command of the incompetent Berthier (previous commander in Bavaria). Scharnhorst, though eager to attack the French at first light, knew that his numerically inferior army would best be used on the defense – since they had obtained the high ground the previous day. Instead of following his orders to Napoleon’s word of delaying (not fighting) the Prussians until he arrived, Berthier believed the best solution was to attack the Prussians. The assault had been ordered for 9 AM after a brief artillery bombardment; however two hours after the bombardment the advance had still not occurred – allowing precious time for the Prussians to further increase their defensive works. Finally just after noon, the first wave of French infantry began their advance against the left flank of Scharnhorst’s army. A surprised was quickly realized by the advancing 30,000 French soldiers – their target was not the left flank of the Prussians but instead its center.

    The first wave of the French troops quickly faltered under the suppressive fire of the artillery and numerous amounts of riflemen (a relatively new addition to the Prussian order of battle). Unwilling to believe that his first wave had been repulsed – and not understanding that he was attacking the center not the left flank, Berthier ordered a second wave into the fray, reinforcing the first wave with another 24,000 soldiers. The same result as before occurred, and the French fell back with heavy causalities. As if expecting a different result, Berthier ordered one last assault against the Prussian defensive line – this time throwing all available reserves into the fray. Again the results were abysmal – though this time the French wave did temporarily breach the Prussian earthworks before being repulsed after heavy hand to hand fighting. As the last wave retreated down the hills, Scharnhorst – who had taken after Napoleon and lead from the front – ordered an all out advance against the retreating forces.

    The results were cataclysmic for Berthier’s force. Of the 120,000 soldiers he had commanded before the assault, 67,000 had been claimed as causalities (23,000 killed, 37,000 wounded or missing, 7,000 captured). Scharnhorst’s force that had been outmatched by 12,000 now emerged much stronger against their opponent. Of 108,000 troops in Prussian uniform, a mere 17,000 had been killed, wounded or missing. While the Prussian commanders knew that they most likely could not inflict a defeat upon the French armies if they recombined (which they would), they had seriously weakened Napoleon’s overall forces within central Europe. Prussia would continue its march towards Dresden; which lay southeast of Meissen – where the battle had been fought. From there, the armies of Prussia and Austria were to combine and wait an additional week or two before the arrival of the 180,000 strong Russian army.


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  13. #13
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    In den Augen Gottes
    An Alternative History Affair
    By TekcoR

    Chapter 1
    Clash of Titans

    Berthier’s devastated command was forced to retreat back towards Chemnitz, where Napoleon’s last known position was. Numerous rides had been dispatched by Napoleon to Berthier, but none had returned with exact or even semi-good guess where the later general’s position was. Finally, on June 5th, both forces were both able to locate each other and agree to rendezvous at Freiburg; which was almost equal distance between Dresden and Chemnitz. Upon his arrival, Berthier was promptly removed from command by Napoleon – whose force now totaled about 161,000 strong. Meanwhile, the Allies, though not yet combined were standing at 164,000 between the Austrian and Prussian armies. Figuring as much, Napoleon sent off letters addressed to the commanders of armies and their respective monarchs begging for a truce.

    The commanders agreed to a truce; until further instruction could be received from their corresponding capitals on the next steps to be taken in the field. This reprieve was acceptable to the commanders – as they knew they were in no position to challenge Napoleon’s forces without at least combining. Even the successful combining of forces; which was completed on June 9th, would not guarantee success. All sides knew that the truce was just a matter of convenience for both sides until reinforcements could be brought up and the battle renewed.

    By June 17th, the game was beginning to unfold for Napoleon. The Russian army had finally arrived, bringing the total Allied strength (barring reinforcements) to 344,000; with additional reinforcements that were received from Prussian and Austrian homelands, the total strength was closer to 360,000. Napoleon’s numbers on the other hand had barely increased from 161,000 to 179,000 – as the III. Corps under Gneisenau and other partisan units was causing major havoc on French rear – intercepting desperately needed supply trains and effectively reducing Napoleon’s forces as reinforcements were needed to secure the routes.



    On June 23rd, the battle of Leipzig would occur between the Allied armies and the 179,000 troops of Napoleon. Always eager to drive a wedge in his opponents, Napoleon though outnumbered was the aggressor in the battle. Believing – with adequate evidence to back up such tactics – that if he could force heavy causalities upon the enemy that they would withdraw in disarray. The brunt of the assault would be launched against the Austrian army; which had barely repulsed the first wave, when a second more substantial wave supported by the Imperial Guard came. Distrusting the Austrian command, the Prussians, supported by the Russians had created a combined corps of roughly 30,000 that was used as a strategic reserve to support any army that needed the additional support.

    As the Austrian front collapsed, the Russo-Prussian corps was ready and waiting for the French. What followed was the end of Napoleon’s attack and the beginning of the Allied counter attack. When the French saw the reserve corps, they prepared to charge, but were repulsed with heavy artillery fire and devastating accuracy of the elite riflemen. The end result of the battle of Leipzig left a clear impression who the dominant powers were, of Austria 76,000 available troops (about 3,000 reinforcements from the previous battle), she suffered 24,000 losses (wounded, killed, missing). Prussia, who had close to 100,000 troops available at Leipzig (9,000 reinforcements received) suffered 15,000 causalities (wounded, killed, missing). Russia, with 180,000 troops available, bore the brunt of the Allied losses, losing a staggering 33,000 wounded, killed or missing. Meanwhile, Napoleon’s force of 179,000 was reduced to a mere shell just above 110,000 troops. With the Allies left in charge of the field, Napoleon was last seen fleeing for Paris.



    Last edited by TekcoR; 06-09-2011 at 14:26.
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  14. #14
    Great! Subscribed!
    I love the fact that you present the historical details too!
    Keep it up!
    To all developers of Victoria 2!!! In the name of historical fairness and of the game's beauty, liberate the satellite states by attributing them fair diplomatic prerogatives! (After you're done with this, don't forget to patch it for Mac too )

  15. #15
    Alternative Affairs Specialist TekcoR's Avatar
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    In den Augen Gottes
    An Alternative History Affair
    By TekcoR

    Chapter 2
    Exile

    With his army defeated, Napoleon had fled to Paris and arrived two weeks later in the late-early July. The hope was to perhaps raise another army before the fury of the Allied armies could bear themselves upon France. However; the people had received the press about further setbacks in Spain in addition to the defeats within Germania. An army would not be raised with willing cooperation of the people. Napoleon’s luster had finally faded.

    The Allied armies quickly reorganized after the drubbing forced upon Napoleon and were to the French border within a mere three weeks. While the armies gathered, the small corps led by Gneisenau and the German partisans had forced the King of Westphalia (Jerome Bonaparte) to flee back to Paris. Prussian troops were welcomed within the Germanic cities and greeted as liberators, as the Bonapartists regime had heavily taxed the nation – sending most of the wealth back to Paris. The local clergy quickly promised additional support for the effort against the Bonapartes; the offer though welcomed would not be needed.

    Back in Vienna, an inter-Allied discussion had begun about the terms that would be offered to Napoleon, if he so chose to accept them. King Fredrick Wilhelm III argued that while Napoleon had committed grievous crimes against the established nations of Europe, he had brought stability to France and deserved to retain as sovereign of France that would be pushed back to the pre-revolutionary period. Tsar Alexander I agreed to Frederick Wilhelm III’s proposition, along as both nations would be properly compensated – mostly Prussia. Alexander felt that an establishment of an enlarged Prussia – while dangerous, if good relations could be maintained would have great benefits to Russia. However; Austria remained skeptical of keeping Bonaparte on the throne of France and additional territory provided to Prussia who it still viewed as a natural enemy over the future hegemony of German states.



    Britain argued for a joint proposal that would serve as a compromise to both sides. Napoleon would be placed in British hands and exiled from mainland Europe. Prussia would be compensated and acquire Westphalia and the Rhineland. Austria’s lost territory would be restored, in addition to acquisition of northern Italy (Lombardy and Venetia). Russia would acquire Prussian and Austrian land from the Second and Third Partitions of Poland. All sides mutually agreed to the compromise proposed by the British. Now it would just be matters of having Napoleon accept the terms.

    Faced with a lack of army due to his unpopular aggression, Napoleon reluctantly would accept the peace terms offered to him on August 16th, 1809. When he was handed to the British, a few keen observers noted that there was a startling look in his eye. Perhaps one day, Napoleon would be seen from again.

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  16. #16
    Alternative Affairs Specialist TekcoR's Avatar
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    In den Augen Gottes
    An Alternative History Affair
    By TekcoR

    Chapter 2
    Return

    After Napoleon had been sent to exile on the island of Elba, with a small detachment of his most loyal Imperial Guard troops, a peace conference had been called in Vienna. Though the official terms were loosely agreed upon, the language had to agree upon in further detail. At first thought, this process was to take at most a month, but a month quickly drug out to a quarter, then a half a year and was beginning to reach a year when news reached Vienna that the unthinkable had happened. The Emperor of Elba had escaped.

    News that the Emperor Napoleon had escaped his exile caused uproar in Vienna. The conference quickly called for the nations to raise several armies in case Napoleon threatened war. On such short notice this would be a monumental task, as the majority of soldiers had returned to their respective nations homes. The nation best perceived able to handle demands of an army would be Prussia; though Metternich was ill with the thought of Austria’s further need from the upstart Prussia. In a risky decision, Emperor Francis I of Austria under pressure from Metternich, insisted to the conference that Austria would raise an army capable of challenging Napoleon if he dared to raise an army.

    Napoleon, who though exiled had kept in contact with key figures back within France that had been witnessing the restoration of the Bourbon monarchy. The monarchy had made itself unpopular by beginning to repeal several of the key reforms Napoleon and his cohorts had enacted during their reign. First reports indicated Napoleon landed at Marseilles on June 2nd, 1810 with a mere 1,000 people. The local garrison commander who had an overwhelming number of 3,000 soldiers quickly “surrendered” to the Emperor with his troops pledging loyalty to the returned savior of France. Upon hearing the news of Marseilles’s defection, King Louis XVIII dispatched Marshal Ney with 12,000 troops to put down the insurrection.

    Ney, who had stated Napoleon should be locked into a cage and brought to Paris, first displayed the resolve that Louis XVIII wanted. While Ney displayed characteristics that were exemplary, the rest of the French military since the Bourbon restoration had failed to go through significant purges of Bonapartists officers. By the beginning of July, Napoleon’s forces had grown to significant 6,000 forces, though half of Ney’s. On July 14th, the two armies gathered and an exchange occurred where Napoleon is said to have said: “If any of you will shoot your Emperor, shoot him now.” After news of Ney’s defection, King Louis XVIII headed into exile in the United Kingdom of the Netherlands.


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  17. #17
    Alternative Affairs Specialist TekcoR's Avatar
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    In den Augen Gottes
    An Alternative History Affair
    By TekcoR

    Chapter 2
    Elba to Helena

    Napoleon entered Paris on July 17th, as King Louis XVIII fled; the scene was utter chaos for the loyalists, but of great celebration to the majority of the populace. Over the next few days, proclamations of immense loyalty went out the returned Emperor. These proclamations and waves of support would be tested as the Emperor immediately called for the mobilization of the nation against the threat of invasion. In his letter to the nation, addressed July 21st, Napoleon called for a “decisive strike against the victors of the previous year before a reaction could be delivered by their swords.” The people went wild, eagerly answering the call to arms.

    By the end of August, Napoleon had mobilized some 370,000 soldiers, whom he divided into separate forces. About 70,000 soldiers were to be stationed against the Franco-German border, with an additional 40,000 soldiers prepared against English Channel coast at Calais. The remaining group, under the command of Napoleon himself would march south across the southern border into Sardinia-Piedmont, then into Austrian controlled northern Italy. His dream of marching 260,000 soldiers across into northern Italy would prove to be a difficult task but with great rewards. The Allied command did not regard a return to Napoleon’s early ventures of fame a likely campaign.

    After a treachours two weeks, the armies of Napoleon had successfully crossed the Alps into Italy, and prepared to battle with the Austrian army of 280,000 at Milan. For the next three days the two armies battled, the Austrians having successfully holding the field the first two days – but with heavier causalities than the resurgent French. On the third day, Napoleon would carry the field after the Austrian left flank gave way to renewed pressure. The battle of Milan (Sept 10th – Sept 13th, 1810) would see heavy causalities, with the newly restored Emperor losing 76,000 (22,000, 47,000 wounded, and 7,000 missing or captured) while the Austrian army lost a staggering 127,000 (37,000 killed, 61,000 wounded, 29,000 missing or captured). Once again, Austria’s military reforms had proved lacking and her generals competency questionable.

    What Napoleon did not expect was the hasty arrival of British forces to the continent. On September 21st, a force of 50,000 British soldiers under the famed Duke of Wellington landed within the United Provinces of the Netherlands and headed towards a rendezvous with the gathering Prussian army at Brussels. The French force within the north was to be greatly outnumbered (110,000 French). The Prussian general, Scharnhorst, with the aide of Blucher and Gneisenau had gathered an overwhelming 190,000 soldiers since the news of Napoleon’s return to France. After meeting up with the British on the 29th of September, the Anglo-Prussian force began their campaign towards Paris. Aware that the enemy would most likely threaten the capital, Napoleon thought to return to the capital to aide in its defense or to continue onwards towards Vienna – which had been his objective in crossing the Alps.

    After recollecting his forces, the Emperor decided to advance further into Northern Italy and possibly force a battle with the remnants of Austrian army. The battle of Verona, that would occur on October 1st and last until mid-afternoon on the 2nd, would witness the near destruction of the remaining Austrian army. Of Austria’s remaining 153,000 soldiers capable of battle, over a third of them would perish in a folly caused by Austria’s poor leadership hell-bent on avenging its defeat and proving the country as a capable great power. Napoleon for his part would earn a great amount of credit for the ambush known as the Battle of Verona. With the Austrian army routed - tail between its legs racing back towards Vienna – Napoleon decided to return to France and meet the Anglo-Prussian force.

    However, Napoleon’s final showdown would not come. In the near month it would take to return across the Alps due to partisan activity from north Italians and the remnants of the routed Austrian army that did not flee towards Vienna. By the time Napoleon crossed the Alps, the Allied force had grown to numbers that Napoleon could no longer realistically compete with. Russia had dispatched a numerically superior force of 230,000 soldiers upon news of the return of Napoleon. Britain had sent another 70,000 troops over, increasing its presence on the continent to 120,000. Meanwhile Prussia had raised its force from 190,000 to 220,000. Even with reinforcements from the mobilization of the population, bringing his forces to 324,000, Napoleon was outnumbered by about 140,000. The armies he faced were not the poor quality of soldier fielded by Austria, but rather the strong, well trained and veteran armies of nations that had brought their armies up-to-date in the reforms and tactics forged by Napoleon in earlier years.

    To the dismay of his generals, Napoleon agreed to surrender to the British in hopes of leniency. None of the nations would grant him as such though. Earlier after his “restoration” to the crown, it was agreed that Napoleon would be exiled to the island of Saint Helena in the south Atlantic and placed under the guard of a coalition of nations; which mysteriously excluded Austria. On November 8th, 1810 Napoleon would leave France for the last time.



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  18. #18
    Alternative Affairs Specialist TekcoR's Avatar
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    In den Augen Gottes
    An Alternative History Affair
    By TekcoR

    Chapter 3
    Return from Isolation





    Europe after the end of the Napoleonic Wars.


    After the signing of the Congress of Berlin in June 1811, the Kingdom of Prussia; which had kept on to its gains from the Partitions of Poland (1st, 2nd and 3rd) while Russia gobbled up Austria’s shares within the partition. Russia was not satisfied with just acquiring Austrian-held Polish territory, and pressed for more by acquiring the Galicia region. By the end of 1812, Russia would push farthest west into Europe. Austria for its part would be compensated by acquiring the Bosnia region from the Ottoman Empire in 1815. The Austrians for their parts had timed their war against the Ottomans well, during the Serbian and Greek uprisings. Before the end of 1815, in a war that lasted mere months, the Ottomans caved.



    After the peace treaty of Vienna ending the Austro-Ottoman war and affirming Greek and Serbian independence, the Kingdom of Prussia (which had remained neutral during the conflict) went into isolation. In the 1830s, the Kingdom was slowly beginning to be weaned away from its isolation policy that was enforced by King Fredrick Wilhelm III. By 1836, the King was in the last years of his life had become a mere figure head in favor of his son the Crown Prince Fredrick Wilhelm IV. The Crown Prince though not yet king, began toning down the reactionary tendencies of his father by loosening the press censorship and hinting at a possible constitution. In addition to the easing of the reactionary polices of his father the Crown Prince began exerting Prussia’s influence within the German states.


    The Balkans after Austrian aggression.


    Although by the signing of the Congress of Berlin, Prussia was the largest German state within Europe, King Frederick Wilhelm III preferred to allow Austria maintain control of the German Confederation. However, the Crown Prince’s philosophy was more realistic. Austria had floundered during the Napoleonic Wars, what was to say that she again would not collapse under pressure? The movement within the Crown Prince’s inner circle would have to proceed slowly as not to alert suspicion that Prussia was willing to challenge Austria’s hegemony over the German states. One of the first measures to begin slowly challenging Austria was the build-up of the military; which in the year of 1836 would see the recruitment of 5 Hussar regiments, 1 artillery and engineer regiment each.

    Prussia’s army would not be the only effort to increase its presence within the world. Construction of 16 frigates was ordered to be completed by the summer of 1838. The objective of the fleet was not to challenge the might of the other powers but simply to provide security to the vital ports of the Baltic and the far off port in East Friesland. The defense of Prussia would be a monumental task. Russia, who Prussia had been befriending to her best of her ability, outnumbered Prussia. France, which had seen a resurgence since 1830 was capable of forcing Prussia to submission, as seen in the years of the Napoleonic Wars. Lastly there was Austria, the least of Prussia’s fears but still capable of posing a challenge.


    A list of the world's Great Powers in order.

    Other Notes & Details for 1836:

    o January 1st
    • Research focus: Medicine.
    • National Focus: Craftsmen in Brandenburg, Silesia
    • Education, Administration, Military spending set to 100%.
    • Tariffs 0%, taxes 50% all strata.
    o January 7th
    • Construction of Fort at Kaiserslautern
    o March 9th
    • Census complete
    o April 22nd
    • Austria and Prussia enter into a military alliance.
    o July 24th
    • Army is reorganized.
    o November 18th
    • Alliance with Denmark.



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  19. #19
    Field Marshal King50000's Avatar
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    Big read so far. I'll follow along

  20. #20
    Second Lieutenant Reqinald's Avatar
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    This is just great. Looking forward to all future updates.

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