+ Reply to Thread
Page 5 of 12 FirstFirst ... 3 4 5 6 7 ... LastLast
Results 81 to 100 of 235

Thread: Grande italia

  1. #81
    Quote Originally Posted by King50000 View Post
    It was getting scary there with the British and French almost linking up, but even if they do now it won't split your forces. Hopefully those forces freed from the imminent destruction of the French will be able to push to British back and get that offensive back up. Anyway to get your own bombers down their with the airbase in Cairo, if there is one?
    The French are not done yet. They are like a noxious weed in the Somaliland area, holding up my plans. I need to win East Africa ASAP and reposition those forces to Europe and the Middle East.

    I have been switching my bombers in and out of East Africa, they are able to make it there without holding Cairo. Without them I wouldn't have made it this far.

    Quote Originally Posted by tommylotto View Post
    Things look like they are going well. Suez looks undefended and will fall in the next update. Your forces in Debre Markos are in good order and should be able to hold out until supplies decide the issue. The French in East Africa are doomed.
    The Eritreans in Debre Markos are the saving grace on the Sudanese Front. The British would have overrun most of Ethiopia if they weren't there as deterrent to a general advance along the entire line.

    People are always complaining about bad infrastructure. For me its ideal.

  2. #82

    Meeting of the Grand Council of Fascism – 14 June 1936

    It had been just over a month since the war with the Allies started. Prime Minister Benito Mussolini was due to present a speech to the Grand Council of Fascism on the progress of the national and the war. Reports were gathered from his various cabinet ministers, Marshal Badoglio on the Alpine Front, Marshal Balbo from ASI and Marshal Graziani in AOI.



    DIPLOMACY

    The war was going well for Italy. The British and French had both been caught off guard and both nations had lost substantial colonial territories. The British were weathering the damage well but the French were struggling with their own internal domestic political problems. This could have accounted for their lack of a decisive response to the Italian invasion of Provence.

    Italy had already pushed through its territorial claims for Egypt, the Sudan and British Somaliland. The latter was already completely within the Fascist grasp while the battle still raged for Egypt and the Sudan. Malta had fallen but no claims for this important island were yet to be rolled out. No doubt the British would not give it up lightly.

    Given the internal political problems in France, should the war be won decisively in East Africa, it was thought that a full Italian offensive in France might knock them completely out of the war. Alternatively, an amicable peace deal might be able to be brokered with the Allies where Italy would retain most if not all of its recent conquests.



    Pushing the irredentism agenda was also another option, particularly against the weakened French. Italy already controlled most of Savoy, Tunisia and French Somaliland. These lands should be hers in any peace that was brokered. By pushing this agenda before brokering the peace deal it would be more likely that these lands would be ceded.

    Although Italy had declared war on the Allies on the basis of British aggression, other European nations felt threatened by her recent actions, first the Abyssinian War in ’35 and now the war against the Allies. This threat may have consequences for Italy in the future. Pushing the irredentism agenda against the French would only enhance this problem.

    The Germans also feared the sudden Italian aggression but diplomatic manoeuvres continued to be rolled out to keep the relationship with Germany strong. Joining the Axis would the start of a war of ideologies which would not end until either side was completely crushed. Such an alliance was a future possibility. Another alternative was to stay out of the Axis but ally with the Germans. Should it be desired to take France entirely out of the war such a manoeuvre would assist greatly as it would open up a two front war for the French.



    While Italy was doing so well, the status quo with Germany would remain.

    PRODUCTION
    Italian production was in a mess. A huge backlog of equipment upgrades looked like it would never be met and the demand for supplies for the full scale multi front war with the Allies was eating up half of the industrial capacity of the nation. Reinforcement requirements from the war were also making a significant impact. To make matters worse, British bombers had wiped out 70% of industrial production in Milan. Consumer good production was very low and the only bright spot.



    The production queue was also a mess. It had developed out of a series of rising and falling priorities. First the desire for naval force projection in the Mediterranean, then the need for garrison troops to free up more infantry divisions for the Alpine Front, then the need to anti-tank and artillery units to defend against a serious French counterattack, then better armour units to try and make a decisive strike on the Alpine Front.

    All that could be gleaned from the review was the hope that a complete victory in the East Africa would reduce the demand for supplies. A switch to doctrinal research might also clear some of the upgrade backlog.

    Raw materials, oil and money were not an immediate worry. Convoy numbers still appeared strong.


    TECHNOLOGY
    Before the war broke out with the UK and their allies, Italian research was focused on the long term developments such as:

    a) bringing out of date techs up to speed;
    b) building the Regina Marina around the Sea Lane Doctrine;
    c) focusing on Naval Bombers for domination of the Mediterranean Sea; and
    d) boosting both militia and infantry weapons research and production.



    With the prospect of a long term war against the Allies, these priorities were going to have to change. With the Italian war equipment already quite out dated before the Abyssinian war, there was still a large backlog of equipment rollouts that needed to be filled. This backlog would not be met anytime soon. This meant that in the short term most equipment based research would not be effective as there was no chance that any of it would ever reach the battlefield.

    Given this problem, it was decided that the future emphasis would be placed on doctrinal research that could rolled out to the front lines without further stressing the production capabilities of the nation.

    Knowledge: Practical and Theoretical
    The war against the allies provided ample opportunities for Italian scientists and industry to increase both their practical and theoretical knowledge. On Land the knowledge ‘rot’ generally continued except for Militia where the building of the garrison divisions and weapon research had dramatically increased theoretical and practical knowledge. Infantry theoretical knowledge had also had a boost from small arms research.

    Similarly, on Naval and Air, theoretical knowledge increased but practicals were falling. Naval production and been put on the backburner and no air production was scheduled.



    Doctrinally, practical was through the roof because of the war on land, air and sea. Theoretical was falling in all categories except for Naval Bombing where specialised pilot training courses had been rolled out.

    In both categories, Industry knowledge was suffering the ‘rot’.


    POLITICS
    With few losses of any consequence from the war and minimal damage to the nation, the Italian Fascist party remained in a strong position. The only black spot was the terrible damage dished out by the British bombers on Milan. Convoy damage, although more severe than the bombings, was considered acceptable given the damage inflicted on the Anglo-French merchant fleets.



    There appeared to be no scope for more optimal law changes, everything was already geared to maximise the full potential of the nation.

    The party popularity was still very strong but the two wars had taken its toll on the organisation of the party. This would need to be attended to.

    Now that significant amounts of British and French territory were occupied, it was thought that it would be better to put military governments in place for these conquests. This would provide a minor boost to production. Likewise in Ethiopia, a full occupation policy would be adopted to provide a minor boost to industrial capacity.


    INTELLIGENCE
    Both Great Britain and France were the highest priority for Italy’s overseas spy agency. For Britain the aim was military espionage. For France, the Italians would try to capitalise on the national disunity and attempt to create even greater divides within the country.

    Priority would also be given to Yemen and Iraq, for reasons disclosed below.

    MILITARY - Chief of the Army Alberto Pariani



    Europe - Report from Marshal Badoglio



    Alpine Front – caught off guard, the French Army of the Alps which was defending the Little Maginot Line had been unable to hold back the advance of the Italian I and IV Armies. The I Army’s objective of driving the French from the Alps and digging in had been achieved. The IV Army was tasked with securing the Nice, the French Riviera and Marseille. All of these primary objectives had now been met. Whether they could be held was the main question. The appearance of French armour had stalled the Italian offensive and now the French Army of the Alps and the 5th Army were counterattacking with the plan of retaking Marseille.

    Future Goals on the Alpine Front:
    It was thought that the best option here would be to hold ground and fight tooth and nail for every piece of French dirt. No future offensive could be undertaken without the addition of significant Italian forces.

    Originally the capture of Corsica was slated as a secondary goal of the IV Army. This objective was now clearly out of their grasp. As the island was undefended it was proposed that an amphibious invasion be undertaken by the newly formed guards divisions in La Spezia and Savona. The Regina Maria would be scrambled to support the landing fleet.



    ASI (Italian North Africa) - Report from Marshal Balbo



    Egypt – the campaign in Egypt was proceeding in accordance with Balbo’s grand plan. The X and VI Armies had driven all the way to the Nile Delta. Cairo had been captured and Alexandria was about to be put under siege. Italian divisions were also advancing towards to the Suez. In the Sinai (east of the Suez), strong Allied forces (British and Iraqi) appeared to be gathering for a counterattack west across the Suez.

    Tunisia and Algeria – like its sister campaign to the east, the Italian IX Army was successfully seizing territory and strategic locations. Tunis had fallen and now the push would be west to Algiers and possibly beyond. The first enemy forces to be met would be at Algiers – strength currently unknown.

    Future Goals in ASI:
    No future plans were revealed. Further expansion beyond Algeria to French Morocco would require further forces which were currently not available. In Egypt, the Allied forces advancing from the Sinai would have to be dealt with before any further advance could be contemplated into the Near East.


    AOI (Italian East Africa) - Report from Marshal Graziani



    Northern Sudan (The Almasy Gambit) – as expected by Balbo, the lightly defended Port Sudan had been seized early on in the campaign by the Abyssinian Army cutting off the main northern supply line of the British 3rd Army. Further success had also been achieved beyond Balbo’s goals, with the 5th ‘Cosseria’ Division now advancing on the undefended Khartoum. Amongst other things, this would provide an important airbase from which the Italians could attack the British 3rd Army. A division would be sent north along the old Cairo to Khartoum Railway to meet up with the cavalry brigade sent south by the VI Army in Egypt.

    Gondar-Jima Front (Western Ethiopia) – Balbo’s original plan was to establish a static front on which the British 3rd Army would be held up. Advantages in terrain and wrecked infrastructure from the 2nd Italo-Abyssinian War would assist in delaying the British advance. From the beginning of the campaign when the British forces launched a surprise attack on Gondar this area had been a source of trouble for the Italians. Here the battle weary Eritrean Corps and other elements of the Abyssinian Army had not been able to hold the line in the north and the south. In the north, the British Indian and African divisions were pushing west, threatening Asmara the Eritrean capital or a link up with the remaining French forces around Djibouti. In the south, more British Indian Divisions were pushing west towards Addis Ababa. It was only in the centre at Debre Markos, that the I and II Eritrean Divisions had been able to hold their ground. Now they were also hard pressed from air attacks and the advance of three British divisions.

    It was hoped that reinforcements could move east out of British and French Somaliland to put an end to the British advances.

    At the southern end of the line, one of the goals under Balbo’s plan was for the ‘Celere Division to drive west to the border of the Belgium Congo and cut off the British 3rd Army from their southern supply routes. Combined with the push into Khartoum in the north, this was effectively one huge “pincer movement” which was to trap the British 3rd Army in South Sudan. The initial push of the Italian ‘Celere’ Division had failed to secure the areas northeast of Lake Victoria. A stronger force would be required to take this area and then drive west into Uganda to the Congo border.



    British and French Somaliland – at the outset of the campaign the undefended British Somaliland fell easily to the Italian Somaliland Army. As Balbo thought, the strong French 1st Army in Somaliland had been thorn in the side of the Italians. Initially they had pushed north with some success but when Di Stefanis attacked the capital from the south they began to crumble. Reinforcements from the Somaliland Army strengthened the Italian position. Now only a few isolated French divisions still held on in the wretched terrain of the Dankalia uplands. Marshal Graziani believed it was only a matter of time before they were crushed and reinforcements could be sent west.

    Jubaland Offensive (British East Africa (Kenya)) – in accordance with Balbo’s plan, elements of the Somaliland Army had crossed the British border and seized the important port town of Mombasa. Apart from some further uncontested conquests in the interior, little else had been achieved here.

    Poor supply lines and primitive infrastructure denied the Somaliland Army access to an easy march into Tanganika and its capital Dar es Salaam. The only option was to either to loop a Division around the western side of Lake Victoria or use sea transports from Asmara in Eritrea to launch an amphibious invasion. A British carrier fleet prowling the coasts of East Africa made the latter a risky option.

    Future Goals in AOI
    With the fall of the French 1st Army in Djibouti likely, Yemen could now be considered a target for conquest in the near future. It was thought that there would be enough forces freed up to meet the requirements of dealing with the British 3rd Army in South Sudan and to undertake this new enterprise. This would allow the Italians to seize the important British port of Aden and secure the control of the Bab-el-Mandeb (Gate of Tears). Such a strategy could not be considered without also taking the island of Socotra and denying the British access to its port.

    To the south, lay Tanganika and its capital Dar es Salaam. It appeared lightly or completely undefended. Given the poor supply routes to this region, control of the seas in this area was considered crucial. This would mean that such a course of action should not be undertaken unless the Allied ports on Madagascar, The Comoros and Seychelles were also not taken. Such a plan was beyond the current resources of the army and navy. The British also had a powerful carrier fleet patrolling along the eastern coast of Africa.

    Regina Marina – Chief of the Navy – Domenico Cavagnari



    At the beginning of the war of Regina Marina had been engaged by a French fleet in the Gulf of Tunis, when it was involved in an operation to garrison Sardinia. With air support the outgunned Italian fleet was able to beat back the French with no losses on either side.

    Soon afterwards the Regina Marina locked horns with the Royal Navy in the battle of Malta and faired very well against the Brits, driving them to port at the loss of several submarines and RM Bari (CL). Once again Italian air support had tipped the balance.



    Since the Battle of Malta the Regina Marina had been refitting and rebuilding its strength. Nothing suggested that the Italians could not continue to take on two of world’s greatest naval powers in Mare Nostrum.

    The Convoy War: In the convoy war in the Mediterranean Sea and Indian Ocean, the Regina Marina had outdone itself, with a loss ratio of 6:1 in the favour of Italy [In game results seem to have replicated out of control with 5400 Allied convoys sunk vs 850 Italian – not sure why]. The positive trend in these results was falling away as the Italian land forces grabbed more and more of the Allied Mediterranean ports. A heavier emphasis would soon have to fall to the western and east Med. In the southern hemisphere the destroyers of Commander Ciano in the Mozambique strait would now be able to utilise the port facilities at Mobassa to more effectively raid in the channel.

    Regina Aeronautica – Chief of the Air Force - Guiseppe Valle



    In all theatres, other than the Alpine Front, the Regina Aeronautica had been playing a supporting role to either the army or the navy. In AOI, the light bomber squadrons had been lending crucial support to whittle away at the French and British divisions. Support had been provided to the navy at the Battle of Tunis and both the navy and the army at the Battle of Malta. The last battle had seriously stretched the resources of this Regina Aeronautica, with many of the air wings involved being placed out of action for significant periods of time. Demands on the multi front war forced them to always be called up for action and never getting a chance to recuperate and reach optimal fighting condition.

    On the Alpine Front, the Regina Aeronautica had initially held its own against French bombers and interceptors. Only the British strategic bomber squadrons had been able to slip the net and inflict serious damage on Milan. Signs indicated a strengthening of French bombers in this region during the recent fighting around Marseille.

  3. #83
    Field Marshal King50000's Avatar
    Cities in MotionEuropa Universalis: ChroniclesHearts of Iron IIIEuropa Universalis: RomeSemper Fi
    Victoria 2Rome: Vae Victis

    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Ohio, USA
    Posts
    2,890
    Things seem to be ok, just as long as the French don't take Marseille Back. Ethiopia seems stable enough, especially once the French forces are finally wiped out.

  4. #84
    You are on the money there King. The triangular French divisions are proving to be tough to deal with in France. Allied forces are also gathering in numbers the eastern side of the Suez.

    I need to defeat the British 3rd Army in the Sudan as soon as possible, reinforce in France and at the Suez.

  5. #85

    Battle of Bonifacio Straits, fall of Marseille and the capture of Khartoum

    Recap: After the Italian victory in Ethiopia in May 1936, the large build-up of British forces on the Ethiopian-Sudanese Border unnerved the Italians. Marshal Balbo pitched a “grand plan” for a war against the Allies to Mussolini. It was accepted and a multi-front war began between Italy and the Allies on the 11th May 1936.

    Following the fall of the Little Maginot Line (in the Alps) and the capture of Malta on the 20th May, the Italians were able to capture other strategic locations of Port Sudan, Berbera, Djibouti and Mombasa in East Africa. In North Africa, the Italian 9th Army has captured Tunis. The 10th Army and the 6th Army have surrounded Alexandria and the Suez is within their grasp. In Provence, after the initial loss of French territory, the front has become static with the arrival of two French armour divisions. The Italian 4th Army has taken Marseille but a strong French counterattack is underway.



    Europe
    Alpine Front
    17th June: The battle for Marseille had raged for 5 days. Over this period the initial attack by two French divisions was boosted when two more divisions were pushed into the fray from the north. One of the new French divisions consisted of cavalry and motorised troops. Under such pressure, the Italian 1st Division could not hold the city and was forced to retreat.


    The Italian 1st Division is forced to retreat from Marseille

    18th June: French forces reoccupied Marseille.


    French troops are escorted back into Marseille

    The Mediterranean
    14th June: After the capture of Marseille it became evident that the French bombers were using the airbases on Corsica to attack the Italian troops along the French Riviera. Orders were sent through to take units from the Savona and La Speza garrisons and land them on the apparently undefended Corsica and seize the airbases.


    2nd Marine Squadron and the landing force

    The 2nd Marine Squadron and its attached transports were designated as the landing fleet. As a precaution, the 1st Marine Squadron which had been recuperating after the Battle of Malta at Tartano now struck west to lend support. A very significant French fleet had been sighted coasting off the French Riviera, so it was though prudent to scramble to whole Regina Marina to support the invasion.

    The partially recovered Italian naval bombers were also scrambled to Rome for defensive purposes.

    15th June: The 2nd Marine Squadron had maneuvered to a position of the coast of Corsica and began disembarking the guard units onto the undefended beaches at Ajaccio. A few hours later, as expected, the main French battle fleet appeared on the horizon, not in the Bonifacio Straits but to the south in the North Tyrrhenian Sea where the 1st Marine Squadron was heading north in support of the invasion. The French fleet was heavily decked out with 12 capital ships (including the carrier Bearn and 6 battleships) and 14 screens.


    French fleet and 1st Marine Squadron lock up in the North Tyrrhenian Sea

    The vast fleet had trouble getting its big guns into position while at the same time protecting the carrier and the accompanying 7 transports. The Italian battleships and cruisers got off the first shots damaging a few of the French battleships (the Provence, Ocean and Courbet). That night a small British fleet appeared along with an accompanying carrier. The allied fleet then pushed north into the Bonifacio Straits where the battle continued.


    Italian battleships unleashing their fury on the French fleet

    16th June: The 51st and 53rd Guard brigades were successfully landed at Ajaccio. The port facilities and airbase were captured soon after. The 51st was sent north to subjugate the rest of the mountains island.


    Progress of the Battle of Bonifacio Straits

    17th June: Utter confusion now broke out in the advancing Allied fleet early in the morning of the 17th. It first started when the Italian 3rd Marine Squadron hit them from the south. Not knowing friend from foe, the French captains panicked as night began to set in and opened up on anything that moved. Three 3 wings of Italian naval bombers accompanied by two wings of Italian interceptors then launched into the lurching fleet, catching the French off guard. Picking out the larger ships they damaged all of six French battleships except the Lorraine and all of the French cruisers. The wounded French battleship, Provence fled north into the arms of the Italian 2nd Marine Squadron, was hit by several salvos from the Italian battleship RM Caio Duilio of the 2nd Squadron and sunk.


    The French battleship Provence limping north before it was sunk by the RM Caio Duilio

    In the chaos, the British fleet got away and fled south to avoid the confused battle.

    18th June: Fighting in the straits continued through the 18th. Again the French got the worst of it, this time a magazine on the carrier Bearn was hit by the big guns on the Italian heavy cruiser the RM Pola. The flames soon spread and she was lost. Further south in the Gulf of Tunis, the 3rd Italian Marine Squadron had slipped away from the battle to the southwest around Sardinia. It was now steaming north in an attempt to cut off the badly damaged French fleet from the newly reopened French port of Marseille. Just off the African coast she was attacked by the British battleship HMS Revenge and a trio of French submarine flotillas.


    French carrier Bearn on fire

    19th June: The haphazard Allied fleet was not up to the task and the broke away. A few Italian destroyers suffered minor damage.

    Later the same day the Italian fleet caught up with the Revenge of the western coast of Sardinia. After a couple of exchanges of fire which damaged an Italian light cruiser, the Revenge slipped away again.

    In the Bonifacio Straits, the badly mauled French fleet continued to duke it out with the Regina Marina but eventually the decided their cause was lost and attempted to break off the battle – they were effectively crippled and now very vulnerable.


    Running battle with the French fleet

    20th June: Appearing from nowhere, a small British fleet joined the battle in the straits and helped protect the French ships from further damage. With the British covering support, the French were able to slip through the Bonifacio Straits to the northwest. They were heading for Marseille. The Italian fleets gave chase and caught up with the tail of the French fleet off the Azure Coast, sinking a cruiser and many destroyers.

    21st June: The hunt continued. Two Italian fleets had pushed further west into the Gulf of Lyon in the event that the French fleet was unable to get into the port of Marseille and kept heading west. It was not the French fleet that they intercepted but the British carrier HMS Furious, the battleship HMS Nelson and their cruiser and destroyer escorts. The outnumbered British fleet fled to safer waters. Later that night the French fleet appeared and Italian ships launched its guns into the crippled French ships.

    22nd June: Assailed from all sides the crippled French fleet, was forced to sacrifice, several destroyers, several transports and the cruiser Suffren to get away from the Italian ambush. This time they headed back the way they came. Expecting this move, the 3rd Marine Squadron had already skirted east in an attempt to again cut them off from the safety of Marseille. Waiting for the Italians this time was the British fleet lead by the carrier HMS Furius and the battleship HMS Nelson. A rigorous exchange of fire ensued. Destroyers on both sides were damaged with the British getting the worst of it. The British heavy cruiser HMS Effingham took a couple of bad shots and the HMS Neslon was also damaged. With the British fleet engaging the Italians, all of the severely mauled French ships finally got into the port of Marseille except for the cruiser Jeanne d’Arc which was sunk by the RM Fume. The British fleet managed an orderly retreat into the port.


    The French fleet finally break through to Marseille with the help of the British

    This had been a very close call for the French navy. If their land forces had not retaken Marseille the entire French navy could have been wiped out.

    North Africa
    Nile Delta
    17th June: At the Delta region, 1st ‘Eugenio di Savioa’ and the 102nd ‘Trento’ Divisions reached the Suez and were able to open it up for Italian shipping. Much needed supplies could now flow through to the troops in East Africa.

    18th June: The British 7th Infantry Division began a counterattack across the canal against the ‘Eugenio di Savioa’ Division. With British forces pressing from the east, it was considered essential that Alexandria be taken as soon as possible. An hour later, the long awaited Italian attack on Alexandria was launched by the 2nd ‘Emanuel Filiberto’ Division and the7th 'Cirene' Blackshirts. The 27th ‘Sila’ Division continued its advance to its allotted assault position.


    Further to the south the lone cavalry brigade detached from the 2nd ‘Emanuel Filiberto’ Division was on its way to the Sudan. It would then have forged a land route through to East Africa.


    The battle for the Suez and Alexandria


    Bersaglieri defending the western banks of the Suez

    21st June: After 3 days of fighting, the Italian divisions attacking Alexandria had made little progress against the dug in British forces. Now however, the Italian 27th ‘Sila’ Division had reached its designated attack position and was launched into the attack. Would it make a difference?


    AOI
    Sudanese Border
    17th June: The 5th ‘Cosseria’ Division triumphantly entered a deserted Khartoum. No British forces offered resistance to the capture of this important strategic location.


    5th ‘Cosseria’ captures Khartoum


    Railway bridge over the River Nile at sunset (Khartoum) - captured intact

    20th June: In northern Ethiopia, British forces had successfully pushed east. The Tanganyikan Colonial Division had conquered Gedaref (north of Gondar ) and was now moving into Teseney. Such a position would threaten the Eritrean capital Asmara and risk cutting the Italian forces in half. In Gondar itself the 14th Indian Division had driven out the Italian 4th Blackshirts Division and was attacking south against the hard pressed I and II Eritrean Division in Debre Markos. Gondar had to be retaken so that the Tanganyikan Colonial Division could be cut off and isolated. All of the Italian forces in the area were already exhausted from fighting. Despite this Marshal Graziani ordered an all out assault on Gondar by three worn out Italian Divisions.

    Graziani’s move was correct. Within hours the 14th Indian Division and the other Divisions attacking Debre Markos in the west called off their attacks with heavy losses. The 14th Indian Division appeared to be heading north to link up with the Tanganyikan Colonial Division


    Main: Graziani orders an all out attack on Gondar; Yellow: British attack on Debre Markos falters; Purple: Tanganyikan Colonial Division continues its drive to the east

    21st June: As expected the Tanganyikan Colonial Division now pushed into Teseney. They were now within striking distance of the Eritrean capital or had the opportunity to link up with the remaining French forces so the southeast.

    French and British Somaliland
    15th June: The remaining French forces were retreating out of French Somaliland into the desolate Dankalia Uplands of Ethiopia, where their infantry divisions still held ground. Cut off from crucial supplies, the previous counterattacks of the infantry divisions had fizzled out. Now it was time for the Italian 19th and the 30th Infantry Divisions to finish them off. As expected many of the French did not have much fight left in them and they began surrendering in droves.


    Finishing off the French in the Dankalia Uplands

    16th June: French forces continued to surrender as the Italians pushed in from the southeast and from Ed in the north.


    Beleagured Fench troops in the Dankalia wastes

    17th June: The French 81st Infantry Division which had fled north out of Daddato before the onslaught of Italian 30th and 19th Infantry Divisions now reached the Dankalia Uplands. Here they found that most of their countrymen had already surrendered from lack of supplies. Faced with an attack on two fronts and with limited supplies of their own, it would only be a matter of time before they too had to surrender.


    The French 81st in the Dankalia Uplands

    19th June: Two days later the French 81st Infantry Division was still heroically holding out against De Stefanis’s determined assaults.

    21st June: The remaining French Divisions finally surrendered. The entire French 1st Army had been lost in Somaliland, with over 40,000 killed and captured. This was a great Italian victory.

    Jubaland Offensive (British East Africa (Kenya))
    17th June: Far to the south in Kenya, the tired Ovest Bassacampi Division was forced to retreat east from Kisumu on the shores of Lake Victoria by the advance of the British 20th Infantry Division. If the British were to be cut off from their southern supply routes it was going to take another push by the Italians.


    Defeat of the Italian Ovest Bassacampi Division

    20th June: Supply problems began to hamper the Italian actions along this front. With the opening of the Suez to Italian shipping it was hoped that this problem could be rectified. In addition, industrial capacity was relegated to the production of additional supplies.


    Supply problems beginning to creep into East Africa

  6. #86
    Field Marshal King50000's Avatar
    Cities in MotionEuropa Universalis: ChroniclesHearts of Iron IIIEuropa Universalis: RomeSemper Fi
    Victoria 2Rome: Vae Victis

    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Ohio, USA
    Posts
    2,890
    Do you have any bombers that can be used to bomb the port in Marseille? You could damage it to the point where the French and British fleets have to leave it and move to a different port I believe

  7. #87
    Lt. General tommylotto's Avatar
    For the MotherlandHearts of Iron IIIHOI3: Their Finest HourSemper Fi

    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Laguna Hills, CA
    Posts
    1,405
    Epic naval battle! The French admirals must not be aware of the stacking penalties. What shape are your NAV squadrons in? As King50000 mentioned, a Port Strike might finish off some of those damages vessels or even force them back out to sea to get some more broadsides from the Regia Marina.

    Having fought the British in East Africa a few times they seem to get supplies miraculously. Was there a stockpile in Khartoum?

    Suez looks precarious. I'm afraid it might take too long to take Alexandria. Do you have any other forces on hand to hold the canal?

  8. #88
    Last images are not working.
    Hearts of Iron 3 AARs
    Napoleonic Dreams AAR
    Ended 28/5/2010
    Unpredictable AAR - Random HoI3 - SuiciSpai Approved
    15/5/2011 - 20/9/2011 - Finished
    Unpredictable II - RandomHoI3 2.3 FTM 3.05
    Prematurely Ended November 2011

  9. #89
    Quote Originally Posted by King50000 View Post
    Do you have any bombers that can be used to bomb the port in Marseille? You could damage it to the point where the French and British fleets have to leave it and move to a different port I believe
    My NAV's and the rest of my bombers are pretty much wrecked. Unfortunately it will take a couple of weeks for them to recover. Sinking the carrier was pretty satisfying.

    Quote Originally Posted by tommylotto View Post
    Epic naval battle! The French admirals must not be aware of the stacking penalties. What shape are your NAV squadrons in? As King50000 mentioned, a Port Strike might finish off some of those damages vessels or even force them back out to sea to get some more broadsides from the Regia Marina.

    Having fought the British in East Africa a few times they seem to get supplies miraculously. Was there a stockpile in Khartoum?

    Suez looks precarious. I'm afraid it might take too long to take Alexandria. Do you have any other forces on hand to hold the canal?
    This is the first time I have seen the stacking penalties in action (having only ever played one game before). I kept looking at the % and then throwing more ships into the frey. If I was wiser they might have all went down.

    There have been no stockpiles worth boasting about so far. Later there are some strange results. Last night I played until 2.30pm and seen a huge pulse of supplies running up the Nile railway - south to north. It popped like a zit when it hit the Nile Delta and breathed life into my starving divisions. I should have got some screenies. Props to Paradox.

    On the Suez, I am still not sure. It might be my Achilles heel.

    Quote Originally Posted by Khazorath View Post
    Last images are not working.
    I just greased the wheel.

  10. #90
    French navy does not look healthy anymore.

    The Suez Canal but no convoys going to East Africa. Do you rely on the AI to create them?

  11. #91
    If only I could catch the RN.

    I have convoys (and trades) set to AI control but recently stopped when it set up a 6 transport trade route to the US. There are a lot of French and British subs patrolling the Med and I dont want them to wipe out my convoys (20 left). If I can survive without them I would prefer to secure the all French and British ports first.

  12. #92
    Field Marshal King50000's Avatar
    Cities in MotionEuropa Universalis: ChroniclesHearts of Iron IIIEuropa Universalis: RomeSemper Fi
    Victoria 2Rome: Vae Victis

    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Ohio, USA
    Posts
    2,890
    Quote Originally Posted by Hardradi View Post
    If only I could catch the RN.

    I have convoys (and trades) set to AI control but recently stopped when it set up a 6 transport trade route to the US. There are a lot of French and British subs patrolling the Med and I dont want them to wipe out my convoys (20 left). If I can survive without them I would prefer to secure the all French and British ports first.
    As long as Gibralter is British, your shipping will always be in danger. Can you recruit Paratroopers yet?

  13. #93

    French counterattack on the Alpine Front and consolidation of Africa Orientale

    Recap: After the Italian victory in Ethiopia in May 1936, the large build-up of British forces on the Ethiopian-Sudanese Border unnerved the Italians. Marshal Balbo pitched a “grand plan” for a war against the Allies to Mussolini. It was accepted and a multi-front war began between Italy and the Allies on the 11th May 1936.

    At the start of the war the Italian I and IV armies had easily pushed over the French forces along Little Maginot Line (in the Alps) and expanded into Provence. The front became static with the arrival of two French armour divisions and the French forces also recently counterattacked and retook Marseille after its conquest by the Italian 4th Army. On the 20th May the Italians were also able to capture Malta from the British and recently Corsica from the French, securing the central Mediterranean.

    In North Africa, the Italian 9th Army has captured Tunis and were now heading west to Algiers. The 10th Army and the 6th Army are besieging Alexandria and defending the line of the Suez against a determined British and Iraqi attack. To the south, in East Africa, the Italians were able to capture the strategic locations in the Somaliland, northern Sudan and British East Africa, effectively trapping the British 3rd Army in the Sudan east of Ethiopia and annihilating the French 1st Army in the unforgiving Dankalia uplands.



    Europe
    Alpine Front
    23rd June: The Alpine Front had been quiet ever since French had reoccupied Marseille on the 18th. All of a sudden the French counterattacked again with massive force. This time four divisions struck against the 2nd Alpine Division holding out in Brignoles. The French attack was multi directional from the north, west and southwest out of Marseille itself. This was an alarming French initiative. General Pintor of the IV Army and Marshal Badoglio quickly went into conference.


    The French counterattack in Provence


    French troops posing for s shot before the attack begins

    24th June: Both commanders had differing opinions on how to approach the situation. Pintor, the more aggressive, proposed two counterattacks to relieve the pressure on the 2nd Alpine, while the more conservative Badoglio wanted to abandon Brignoles and retreat to better defensive positions. A retreat from Brignoles had the added threat of endangering the Italian positions in Toulon (including its vital forward airbase) to the east of Marseille. General Pintor got his wish.

    Two divisions in Toulon advanced west against Marseille in an attempt to break the attack from that direction. Likewise to the north, the 48th ‘Parma’ Division of the newly arrived Italian VIII Army attacked the French mountain division in Manosque.

    General Pintor’s response to the French counterattack

    26th June: A few days later it became evident that General Pintor’s attack was not going to relieve the French pressure on the 2nd Alpine Division in Brignoles. In fact the 2nd Alpine was on the verge of collapse. Marshal Badolgio fearing that the two divisions being thrown at Marseille would be needlessly sacrificed, called of their attack. The Italians suffered losses of 2:1 against the French defenders.


    Marshal Badoglio interferes with General Pintor’s plan

    Before Badoglio’s intervention, the 1st Alpine Division had reached Digne-les-Bains to the east of Brignoles and had been ordered forward to take up positions in Brignoles by General Pintor. As the French Divisions now occupied Brignoles the 1st Alpine now became the attacker. In Toulon, on the coast, the 1st ‘Superga’ Division had been recovering after it was driven out of Marseille. Pintor now ordered this division to join the counterattack on Brignoles with the 1st Alpine.

    29th June: Ever since the French had suffered a trio of defats on the 29th May in the northern part of the Alpine Front everything had been quiet. The Italian 1st Army dug in to the foothills of the Alps while the French forces recuperated. Around Chambery, the historical capital of Savoy, the 3rd ‘Ravenna’ Division, suddenly came under attack from the French 31st Mountain Division which had been garrisoning the university city of Grenoble. General Guzzoni immediately ordered a counterattack against Grenoble by the 33rd ‘Acqui’ Division from its position at Le Bourg-d’Oisans. After four hours of fighting the French mountain division called off the attack on Chambery. The attack of the 33rd on Grenoble was called off, its objective had been achieved.



    The Italian IV Army defending Chambery


    Italian infantry of the 33rd ‘Acqui’ Division on the move against Grenoble

    1st July: The battle for Brignoles still raged. The attack of the 1st ‘Superga’ Division from Toulon had slowly faded over the last few days and eventually they refused to keep advancing, their supply and leadership in a mess. This left the 1st Alpine Division to sustain the brunt of the fighting until reinforcements could arrive.


    Battle of Brignoles – 2nd phase


    North Africa
    Nile Delta
    24th June: With the added pressure of the 27 ‘Sila’ Division moving into position for attack the British headquarter units in Alexandria began to show the strain. Hastily armed, they were not up to the task of defending against the combat divisions of the Italians.


    Battle of Alexandria and the heroic defence of the Suez by the 1st ‘Eugenio di Savioa’ Division

    28th June: The command staff of the British 2nd Army and the Middle East Command continued to suffer from the withering attacks of the Italian 2nd Division and the 7th Blackshirts. British casualties were beginning to mount and even the British 7th Infantry showed the first signs of stress under the Italian onslaught.
    To the east the 1st ‘Eugenio di Savioa’ Division singlehandedly continued its defence of the Suez against mounting odds.


    Italian officers go on a sightseeing tour using a requisitioned commercial plane

    1st July: In Alexandria, the command staff of the British 2nd Army and the Middle East Command had surrendered but the British 7th Division still hung on strongly to its fortified positions in the city. Now the situation took a turn for the worst for the British, the 27th ‘Sila’ Division had finally joined the front in its full capacity, its heavy guns blasting away at the British forward positions.


    Battle of Alexandria: the noose tightens as the British staffers surrender

    AOI
    Sudanese Border
    22nd June: The British 14th Indian Division in Gondar was outnumbered, attacked from all sides and from the air by the Regina Aeronautica. After two days of battle they began their retreat back to the British territory in the Sudan. Once again Gondar changed hands.


    Another victory in the Gondar by the Italians


    Blackshirt laying down machine gun fire


    24th June: With the Tanganyikan Colonial Division sitting in Teseney, right on the doorstep of the Eritrean capital, something urgent had to be done. Like the successful attack against the 14th Infantry Division in Gondar, Marshal Grazinai ordered a multi-front attack with what was available. The idea was to pin down the colonials while other units could be brought to the location to finish them off. At the same time Berti’s III-AOI Corps was order to advance south into Gedaref and cut them off from the British 3rd Army east of Ethiopia.


    The Tanganyikan Colonial Division on the Eritrean border

    28th June: As the sun set over the mountains on the evening of the28th, Berti’s III-AOI Corps secured Gedaref partly cutting off the Tanganyikan Colonial Division from the rest of the Briitsh 3rd Army. Later that night the Italian 4th Blackshirts Division under Major General Babini, once again secured Gondar for the Kingdom. The Tanganyikan Colonial Division was now completely cut off.

    30th June: The Italian troops in the war ravaged Gondar once again came under attack, presumably part of a British plan to break through to the Tanganyikan Colonial Division cut off in Teseney. This time the British ordered forward their Ugandan colonial troops. The colonials were fresh but were at a disadvantage because firstly they had to cross the Blue Nile and secondly the mountainous terrain of Gondar made it difficult to conquer. Despite these advantages the Italians would be hard pressed to given the combat weary state of the division. Italian reinforcements were expected to arrive from the east in a week.


    The Tanganyikan Colonial Division cut off from the British 3rd Army

    Jubaland Offensive (British East Africa (Kenya))
    25th June: With the defeat of the Ovest Bassacampi ‘Celere’ Division at Kisumu on the 17th Jun, the British were threatening a southern breakout of the great Italian “pincer movement”. The 20th Infantry Division was heading south to the rail town of Kisumu on the shores of Lake Victoria. Maj General Cona was ordered to strike west from his new position at North Horr and pin down the 20th Indian Division in Gulu until assistance could arrive. Moving west in support of Cona’s attack was the powerful 29th ‘Piemonte’ Division (Maj General Franttini) and Nasi’s 1st Libyan Division.


    Defeat of Cona’s 3rd Blackshirts Division

    29th June: Three days later Cona’s 3rd Blackshirts Division was still battling alone against the British 29th Indian Division. Although they had inflicted some damage on the British division, they had come off the worst after being ambushed after moving into the hot volcanic lands west of Lake Rudolf (Turkana). General Frusci ordered Cona to pull his men back.

    1st July: While the British 20th Infantry Division was being held up by the advance of the 3rd Blackshirts, the Italian 29th ‘Piemonte’ Division, now rested after the Abyssinian War, had marched west and secured Kisumu for the Italians. Advancing south from the British Protectorate of Uganda, the 20th Indian Division ran into this unexpected resistance. The ‘Piemonte’ Division had only just got its guns into position.


    The guns of the 29th ‘Piemonte’ Division are put in place


    Second battle of Kisumu begins

  14. #94
    Field Marshal King50000's Avatar
    Cities in MotionEuropa Universalis: ChroniclesHearts of Iron IIIEuropa Universalis: RomeSemper Fi
    Victoria 2Rome: Vae Victis

    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Ohio, USA
    Posts
    2,890
    Maybe it is time to try to make peace, while you still control alot of your cores in France?

  15. #95
    Lt. General tommylotto's Avatar
    For the MotherlandHearts of Iron IIIHOI3: Their Finest HourSemper Fi

    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Laguna Hills, CA
    Posts
    1,405
    Quote Originally Posted by King50000 View Post
    Maybe it is time to try to make peace, while you still control alot of your cores in France?
    That would leave both Italy and UK in joint control of Suez. If Alexandria is about to fall, push to Palestine first. Then ask for peace.

  16. #96
    Quote Originally Posted by King50000 View Post
    Maybe it is time to try to make peace, while you still control alot of your cores in France?
    The only real gain I have at the moment are the fortifications of the Little Maginot Line, France would be wid open when the Germans attack. Without Marseille there is nothing worth having (Nice is underrated in vanilla HOI3). Peace would be nice though, so that I can build some real armies. A focused push (gamble) and I could retake Marseille.

    Quote Originally Posted by tommylotto View Post
    That would leave both Italy and UK in joint control of Suez. If Alexandria is about to fall, push to Palestine first. Then ask for peace.
    Securing the Suez is crucial for my Empire. Getting across the Suez is very tough, perhaps its my "Achilles Heel", this is where I faulted in my last game. The only difference here is that I have my AOI armies completely intact but I had no Para's or Marines because its so early.

  17. #97

    Spanish Civil War begins, the fall of Alexandria, Axis versus Allies

    Recap: After the Italian victory in Ethiopia in May 1936, the large build-up of British forces on the Ethiopian-Sudanese Border unnerved the Italians. Marshal Balbo pitched a “grand plan” for a war against the Allies to Mussolini. It was accepted and a multi-front war began between Italy and the Allies on the 11th May 1936.

    At the start of the war the Italian I and IV armies had easily pushed over the French forces along Little Maginot Line (in the Alps) and expanded into Provence. The front became static with the arrival of two French armour divisions and the French forces also recently counterattacked and retook Marseille and are slowly pushing east. On the 20th May, the Italians were also able to capture Malta from the British and later Corsica from the French, securing the central Mediterranean.

    In North Africa, the Italian 9th Army has captured Tunis and were now heading west to Algiers. The 10th Army and the 6th Army are besieging Alexandria and defending the line of the Suez against a determined British and Iraqi attack. To the south, in East Africa, the Italians were able to capture the strategic locations in the Somaliland, northern Sudan and British East Africa, trapping the British 3rd Army in the Sudan east of Ethiopia and annihilating the French 1st Army in the unforgiving Dankalia.



    Europe
    Spain
    News arrived from Spain of a tight election where a quarrelling coalition of socialists, liberals and communists formed government. When the opposition leader Jose Calvo Sotelo was assassinated, the country was on the verge of anarchy.

    Out of Africa emerged the military strongman General Francisco Franco along with his Nationalist colleagues. The Spanish Civil War had begun.


    Franco and his team

    The ideology of Franco and the Nationalists was closely aligned to that of the ruling powers in Germany and Italy. A call went out for assistance.


    The Spanish Civil War begins

    Despite the stresses of the current war Mussolini was of the opinion that a Spanish ally might be able to help secure Italian control of the western Mediterranean in the future.


    Italian armour preparing for transport to Iberia


    Alpine Front
    2nd July: The battle of Brignoles finally came to an end when the 1st Alpine Division was unable to continue to sustain its attack. The battle had started on the 3rd June when four French divisions had attacked the 2nd Alpine Division. The French divisions were able to easily drive out the Italian 2nd Alpine troops but the battle continued when they locked horns with the advancing 1st Alpine. The 1st ‘Superga’ Division had been thrown into the battle from Toulon from the south but it was ineffective. The Italians sustained over 1000 casualties in this bloody battle.


    French are victorious in the Battle of Brignoles, the Italians win the Battle of Monasque

    To the north, two Italians infantry division continued their success against the lone French division in Monasque.

    3rd July: The French 65th Infantry Division was defeated at Manosque and retreated after sustaining heavy casualties.

    5th July: The victorious French Division in Brignoles now attacked west under the leadership of Major General Ariabosse. His goal was obviously to cut off the Italian divisions in Toulon from the front. General Pintor immediately launched a relief attack with the 3rd Alpine Division in Digne-les-Bains which put a halt to the French offensive. The 3rd ‘Julia’ Alpine Division was then ordered to retire from its attack.


    The IV Army stops the French attack on Coglin with a thrust against Brignoles

    6th July: On the 6th of July, the French again launched an attack from Grenoble on Chambrey, where the 3rd ‘Ravenna’ Division was dug in. Like before, General Guzzoni ordered a counterattack against Grenoble by the Italian 33rd ‘Acqui’ Division. The French attack on Chambery soon stopped. The 33rd pulled out of the counterattack on Chambery soon after.


    The I Army stops the French attack on Chambery with a thrust against Grenoble


    French troops defending Grenoble during the counterattack of the Italian I Army



    ASI:North Africa
    Nile Delta
    3rd July: Major General Miller and the 7th British Infantry Division were still holding out in Alexandria under severe pressure. The staffers of the command units had long ago surrendered.

    To the south, the forward scouts of 4th ‘Santi Maurizio’ cavalry brigade made contact with the Ovest Bassacampi Division along the Nile railroad. Major General Tellera then ordered his colonial troops to move east to the Red Sea where he would advance north along the coastal road and secure it for Italy.


    The Battle for Alexandria and the link up of ASI and AOI are only a matter of time. In the south the Tanganyikan Colonial Division is surrounded and defeated


    The 4th ‘Santi Maurizio’ cavalry brigade following the old Nile Railway south towards Khatroum

    4th July: Further to the south the first British Division surrendered to Marshal Graziani east of Asmara.

    At the Suez, di Bergolo’s 1st ‘Eugenio di Savioa’ Division continued its heroic defence of the canal. His troops were hard pressed by two British Division's, an Iraqi Division and the Royal Airforce.


    Left : di Bergolo’s 1st ‘Eugenio di Savioa’ Division are fighting increasing odds along the canal; Right: The British 7th Division surrender, Alexandria has fallen


    ALEXANDRIA - Top Left: The 12th Artillery Regiment attached to the 27th ‘Sila” Division bring their heavy guns to bear on the British positions. Top Right: the 7th Bersaglieri of the 2nd ‘Emmanuele Filiberto’ Divison are the first to get through to the city centre. Bottom Left: Bersaglieri on Benelli 500 M36 tricycles. Bottom Right: The tricolours is raised in Alexandria

    5th July: In Alexandria, Major General Miller finally brought out the white flag and surrendered to Major General Gioda. Over 9,000 British prisoners were taken.



    AOI:North Africa
    Sudanese Border
    2nd July: Marshal Graziani was very eager to deliver a death blow to the stubborn Tanganyikan Colonial Division. No close reinforcements were available which he could use to so he gathered together the men if the command units in Asmara, his own AOI HQ, the Eritrean Army HQ and the Est Bassacampi Corps HQ. These men were hastily armed and Marshal Graziani personally lead them west into the mountains to clinch the deal.

    Four Italian light bomber wings rained down death on them from the skies.


    Graziani’s makeshift “division’s” join the Battle of Teseney

    In Gondar the tired 4th Blackshirts Division was still hard pressed by the Uganda Colonials. To counter this threat Lt General Messe ordered the advance of the 1st Eritrean Division across the Blue Nile to attack to British position in Ed Damazin.


    The 4th Blackshirts are at breaking point


    The Battle of Gondar is won following the counterattack of the 1st Eritrean Division

    4th July: Further to the south the first British Division surrendered personally to Marshal Graziani east of Asmara. Over 5,500 prisoners were taken – the Tanganyikan Colonial Division was no more (see North African image above).

    5th July: A few days later the tough Eritreans has done their job. The British attack on Gondar was called off. With the advance of the 5th ‘Cosseria’ Division behind the British forces, Messe decided that it was finally time to go on the offensive, the 1st Eritrean Division was told to continue their attack.


    Somaliland
    5th July: At the Ogaden, the Sultan of Sciavella was politely asked to swear fealty to King Emmanuel III and give up his independence. The Sultan lined up his horse troopers into front of his fort as if he was going to contest the request but then formerly surrendered to the Italian envoy.


    The Sultan of Sciavella gives up his independence


    Jubaland Offensive (British East Africa (Uganda))
    5th July: In Uganda, the British 20th Indian Infantry was fighting a losing battle against the 29th ‘Piemonte’ Division for the railway town of Kisumu. At North Horr, the 1st Libyan Division had arrived and Nasi decided to launch a combined attack with the 3rd Blackshirts into the flank of the British.

    The 3rd Blackshirts re-cross to the west of Lake Rudolf with the support of the 1st Libyan Division and attack the flank of the British 20th Indian Division. The Battle of Kisumu is won.

    6th July: The battle of Kisumu is won and the 20th Indian Divisions advance south is halted.



    Europe
    7th July: Over the last month, the Italian foreign ministry had been very busy as the diplomatic channels between Fascist Italy and Nazi Germany began to run hot. The Nazi leadership were obviously impressed with the Italian war against the Allies and there was the question of Spain. Hitler requested a personal meeting with Mussolini to discuss the relations of the two nations going forward.


    Hitler arrives in Venice

    The two leaders again met in Venice, like they had in 1934. The situation in Spain was discussed and both leaders pledged military support for the new regime Spanish under Franco. Hitler then asked the question. The question that could lock the Kingdom of Italy into a long ideological battle of survival with the so called “free” nations of the world – the Allies. From the discussions it was clear that the Nazi's were not yet willing to go to war, they were content to let the Italians continue the fight while they sat on the side lines and re-armed.


    Hitler’s question

  18. #98
    Captain KyrionMyrthar's Avatar
    Crusader Kings IIEuropa Universalis: ChroniclesFor the MotherlandHearts of Iron IIIHOI3: Their Finest Hour
    Semper FiSengokuVictoria 2Victoria II: A House Divided

    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Teaneck, NJ
    Posts
    414
    Good work down in Africa.

  19. #99
    Field Marshal Cybvep's Avatar

    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Poland
    Posts
    8,239
    A very detailed and interesting AAR. Subscribed.

    It seems that the French were able to redeploy troops from northern France in order to counter the Italian threat. However, they won't be able to counter-attack as effectively if Germany joins your war against the Allies.

  20. #100
    Lt. General tommylotto's Avatar
    For the MotherlandHearts of Iron IIIHOI3: Their Finest HourSemper Fi

    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Laguna Hills, CA
    Posts
    1,405
    Hitler's question: No! Just say no.

    Your position in France is a bit sketchy, as the French will continue to transfer troops from the north. However, you could always fall back to the heavily fortified narrow front in the mountains and hold out forever. Africa is going well. Secure Suez, solidify your positions on the eastern side of the continent, then offer peace from a position of strength. You do not need Hitler's eternal ideological death struggle to do that. Now, on the other hand, if the Brits reject your olive branch...

+ Reply to Thread
Page 5 of 12 FirstFirst ... 3 4 5 6 7 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts