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Thread: Wanting to get into EU3

  1. #1

    Wanting to get into EU3

    I have EU4 and all the significant DLC's, played 385 hours total.

    How different is EU3 from EU4? Anything I need to know? Starting nations? Different mechanics, etc?

  2. #2
    The nations are about the same, but mechanics are quite different - depending on how many EU3 expansions you have. I warmly recommend getting at least Heir to the Throne or Divine Wind. The recommended starting nations are perfectly fine, though virtually all are quite playable. A few notable differences are listed below:

    Research is based on your economy rather than monarch points. You have sliders to direct where your monthly income gets invested (five tech trees, stability or minting). Unless you mint you only get cash from end-of-year tax, so it's ok to run a monthly deficit as long as your yearly cash covers it.
    You can have any number of diplomatic connections without penalties. The AI won't accept an alliance if either you or them have three or more non-vassal alliances already.
    Any number of vassals is possible at a time, they do not give you cores while incorporated. All vassals give you half their base tax and land force limit.
    Ideas are chosen instead of idea groups. They are the same for all countries, but certain tech levels unlocks a few more.
    You're automatically assigned rivals and one mission, so no possibility to pick among alternatives. Missions can be cancelled and rivals are updated automatically. Which rivals you have is less important.
    The computer accepts/rejects deals (alliance, marriage, border access etc) with a weighted random factor. It only tells you whether acceptance is Very likely/Likely/Maybe/Unlikely/Very unlikely/Impossible. Good relations and good diplomacy score (ruler attribute+ modifiers) improves chances.
    Merchants, missionaries, diplomats etc are gained monthly and spent when performing an action. You can have up to five stored of each kind.
    Casus belli and cores cannot be fabricated at will, but it's possible to get them through events and missions. Cores also cannot be bought, provinces automatically cores once you've owned them for 50 years. You also get cores when inheriting nations of your culture group.

    My EU4 experience consists entirely of watching let's plays (too weak computer to play it) but I've picked up the basics of it that way. I've got lots of EU3 experience though. To be honest, EU4 has a better UI, but EU3 offers more possibilities to branch off in different directions. You could check the comparative thread for pros and cons.

    Going into much more detail than that is hard unless you specify which EU3 expansions you have, as they all added quite a lot of new material and mechanics.
    Last edited by cuendillar; 25-01-2015 at 20:59.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by cuendillar View Post
    The nations are about the same, but mechanics are quite different - depending on how many EU3 expansions you have. I warmly recommend getting at least Heir to the Throne or Divine Wind. The recommended starting nations are perfectly fine, though virtually all are quite playable. A few notable differences are listed below:

    Research is based on your economy rather than monarch points. You have sliders to direct where your monthly income gets invested (five tech trees, stability or minting). Unless you mint you only get cash from end-of-year tax, so it's ok to run a monthly deficit as long as your yearly cash covers it.
    You can have any number of diplomatic connections without penalties. The AI won't accept an alliance if either you or them have three or more non-vassal alliances already.
    Any number of vassals is possible at a time, they do not give you cores while incorporated. All vassals give you half their base tax and land force limit.
    Ideas are chosen instead of idea groups. They are the same for all countries, but certain tech levels unlocks a few more.
    You're automatically assigned rivals and one mission, so no possibility to pick among alternatives. Missions can be cancelled and rivals are updated automatically. Which rivals you have is less important.
    The computer accepts/rejects deals (alliance, marriage, border access etc) with a weighted random factor. It only tells you whether acceptance is Very likely/Likely/Maybe/Unlikely/Very unlikely/Impossible. Good relations and good diplomacy score (ruler attribute+ modifiers) improves chances.
    Merchants, missionaries, diplomats etc are gained monthly and spent when performing an action. You can have up to five stored of each kind.
    Casus belli and cores cannot be fabricated at will, but it's possible to get them through events and missions. Cores also cannot be bought, provinces automatically cores once you've owned them for 50 years. You also get cores when inheriting nations of your culture group.

    My EU4 experience consists entirely of watching let's plays (too weak computer to play it) but I've picked up the basics of it that way. I've got lots of EU3 experience though. To be honest, EU4 has a better UI, but EU3 offers more possibilities to branch off in different directions. You could check the comparative thread for pros and cons.

    Going into much more detail than that is hard unless you specify which EU3 expansions you have, as they all added quite a lot of new material and mechanics.
    Thanks for the reply. I have Europa Universalis III Complete, which adds In Nomine and Napoleons Ambition.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by NeonNinja96 View Post
    Thanks for the reply. I have Europa Universalis III Complete, which adds In Nomine and Napoleons Ambition.
    You should get Divine Wind. The majority of mods are for Divine Wind, and you are more likely to get tech support.

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