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Thread: Rank and File: A clerk's war Germany 1936 (Semper Fi)

  1. #2901
    Citizen Sarayakat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by arkham1010 View Post
    Dude, seriously, take a long as you need. This is just a video game. RL comes first.
    This. Looking forward to your next update. Be well. They don't really seem to make an appropriate smiley for this sort of thing...
    Hodor.

  2. #2902
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    My condolences. Take as much time as you need, your family comes first.
    My own little AAR Glory adn Poor Spellign: The Story fo Brandenburg

    "Dasfubar, I now pronounce you as the most real life productive member of the Paradox OT (that we know of)." -MacGregor

  3. #2903
    I'm rly sorry to hear that Uriah! I hope all the best for you and your family and much strength to go trough it all!

    my thoughts are with you and a big manly hug from holland
    Originally Posted by Remble in his AAR The Setting Sun - Gotterdammerung, Japan 1944. (Writer missing in action)

    "What about the Pacific?" asked Hideki.
    "Oh I forgot. The Pacific is a large body of water. We own it. No one is trying to dispute that fact." Tanigawa answered with a grin.
    "I am so glad I asked. Please continue Minister Satoru."


    If you like reading, try Uriahs HOI3 AAR

    "Rank and File: A clerk's war Germany 1936 (ver 1.4)" (stopped)

  4. #2904
    Lt. General Uriah's Avatar
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    Rank and File
    A Clerk’s War



    Saturday 25th to Friday 31st October, 1941

    Looking back over the last week, I can see that the weather in the east is starting to impact the Wehrmacht. Not in terms of casualties or success in individual battles, but in the overall intensity of combat on the East Front. On the 25th just one new battle began, and none on the 31st. From scanning the communiqués from the various HQs, the reason is clear: supply. While the north has the benefit of better infrastructure, it is most impacted by the freezing conditions. The south still has fine weather, but the road and rail links are primitive in the extreme.

    The word around Berlin is that a major reorganisation of our armies in the East is being prepared, and I must say that most of the administrative officers I see coming and going on the streets look harried and no longer stop to chat. One particular source of information for me hardly glanced at my “Wie geht’s?” and I noticed he had not shaved for a few days. Something big is definitely up.

    Otherwise things are normal. Research programs continue to deliver results and this week alone three projects were completed. A combined Luftwaffe/Heer investigation of equipment for our Fallschirmjägers recommended a series of improvements, engineers designed a much improved carriage and sights for both our flak guns and our field artillery. In their place we have a long term study on single engine airframes (this could take a long time – it is truly groundbreaking), the development of a new airborne torpedo and work on new anti-aircraft guns for our aircraft carriers.

    I am sure I am not the only person to notice that our scientists and engineers have been instructed to pursue many projects completely unconnected with the war in the east. What use are torpedoes against the Soviet Red Army? We have cleared the Ostsee and the Regia Marina controls the Mittelsee. Who could threaten an air attack our carriers? Not the puny RAF. I am concerned that there is something I do not know. Whether it is something picked up by Ribbentrop’s diplomatic corps or Frick’s spies, or whether the Führer, now that Moskva has fallen, is looking west for a new challenge I do not know.



    State of the art engineering in a new factory complex


    If I needed more evidence that something is being planned, I noticed (there was no publicity) that Minister Schacht slightly changed the production budget. Despite the demands for improved equipment for the Wehrmacht and Bayerlein’s never-ending pleas for more road and rail construction gangs, Schacht has slipped in provision for the construction of five new industrial complexes. Work has already begun in Nürnberg, Frankfurt, Stettin, München and Bitberg. These will not be ready to produce anything until next spring and will not give a return on investment for years. Is the war to continue that long?

    I could speculate for hours, but who knows what is being planned behind the closed doors of the Führer’s office. Security is much improved from those early days when Gisela could slip in and out with her notepad. There is no way I would now risk her life by asking her to offer to take notes, not that she would be needed. Any notes taken at these meetings seem to be taken by grim faced SS officers and my one attempt to secure copies “for the official records” led to an extremely unpleasant few hours with a man whose exact position and role was unclear. I made it obvious I didn’t want to find out.

    Anyway, back to events.

    Baltic Army (Kesselring)



    At dusk on the 26th Podporoz’e was ours, and not a moment too soon. General von Brauchisch reported the temperature is now -9 degrees and snow is falling. 24.ID was to move up and start digging in for the winter.

    That at least was the plan. Only the next day, however, General Jahn and 2nd Marine-Sturm Division were in action, fighting 315 Strelkovaya for possession of the same ground as had been fought for previously. Soon 24.ID was also engaged and the Luftwaffe joined in courtesy of clear skies and Wever’s bomber geschwader. Soon the fresh snow was marred by bomb craters, shell holes, burning buildings and vehicles and trails of oil, smoke and blood. Once again the Russians were stubborn in their defence and it took until midday on the 30th for the battle to end in our favour.


    Polen Army Nord (von Manstein)



    Perhaps the first sign of impending changes was the announcement on 25th that Hausser’s 1st PzKorps was to be detached from von Manstein’s Army and sent south to Odessa. Further orders were to be issued on its arrival. I expected a tirade from von Manstein at losing his spearhead, but there was no response. On reflection, I think that he realised that the supply problems the huge mass of armour and vehicles created were a headache he could do without during the winter.

    Polen Army Nord was also given a new objective. It is to take the city of Jaroslavl before the real winter sets in. That will be the anchor for left wing of von Manstein’s front line.

    As was predicted in my last summary, von der Chavellerie’s opposition in Kazin was not a serious threat. With nearly 50,000 men under his command he simply steamrolled his way past “Chapaevskaya”. (The Russians were probably still shaken by their rough handling by Neuling in Rameski).

    The only battle commenced on the 25th gave me a start. I had been so busy that I had almost forgotten I had a brother fighting in the East. Suddenly it was brought home to me: as Harpe’s 3rd leichte Panzer Division moved into Kimry, a Pzkpfw 38(t) of Panzer Reg’t 5 “Wundsdorf” was also on the move, a vehicle commanded by my brother Heinz. I spent a couple of days of worry (and guilt that I had not followed his career more closely) before the battle was concluded with negligible losses. Still, maybe I should send him a package. I am sure he would appreciate some schnapps wrapped inside a pair of woollen socks.

    The battle for Lesnoye started well with an immediate breakthrough by 28.ID. Within a day, however, something must have gone drastically wrong. Early on the 27th General Eicke admitted defeat, beaten by two Soviet cavalry divisions. Luckily for the honour of Polen Army Nord, by 7PM that evening General Pfeffer was able to assure von Manstein that he would handle the matter. 21.ID showed the cavalrymen that infantry was now the ruler of the battlefield, though it took them 4 days to drive the last horsemen from the province.



    Resting between battles: Soviet cavalry men after throwing back 28.ID


    8.ID was able to clear Shchelkovo, northeast of Moskva, giving the garrison of the enemy capital a bit of a buffer. The Red Army must be very weak: it took just 12 hours to drive out 80th Strelkovaya.

    With the change of objective, General Neuling found himself at the focus of attention. Not one to miss a chance, he sent 71.ID directly at the city, straight through Beloborodov’s 306th Strelkovaya. With temperatures hovering just above freezing, his infantry took Uglic in a little over 48 hours. Yaroslavl was in sight, if supplies could get to 71.ID in time.

    Polen Army Nord must be pleased as battle after battle is concluded. The supply problems are bad enough without the whole front sucking up every available truck and wagon load. A large drain on resources was the fight for Aleksin, where we had 40,000 men (including two Panzer divisions) engaged against 46,000 Russians. Now that battle is over, the Russians pulling back slowly. Losses were about equal, but the Oka has been crossed.

    Having sorted out “Chapaevskaya” in Kazin, it was only a couple of days before von der Chevallerie was again engaged, this time in Kaljazin. “Chapaevskaya” had fled there with 95.ID hot on its tail, but it was 3rd “Bessarabiya” Cavalry Division that screened the retreat. The cavalry had no hope of stopping the pursuit and at 10AM on Wednesday 29th the last Russian horseman joined the infantry in fleeing east.

    XV Armeekorps was not to be left out of the wave of action from Polen Army Nord. The looming bad weather and rumours of mass transfers to the south encouraged all von Manstein’s subordinates to greater efforts. One that might be costly was the decision to block the escape route from Tula through Novosomorsk. There are a large number of units already in the area and intelligence is that more are heading that way. To halt this flow General Demelhuber has assigned just one division: Strecker’s 86.ID. This will be a real test.

    After the less than glorious result of his intervention in Lesnoye, Eicke must have been anxious to show that this was just an aberration in his performance. He got his chance on the 29th when 28.ID was ordered into Gummala. Vatutin’s 68th Strelkovaya was in peak condition, but Eicke’s men were far more aggressive this time. It took two days (both sides received reinforcement divisions) but the blot of Lesnoye was removed when Eicke reported success.



    One of Vatutin’s officers shows he has plenty of RGD-33 grenades.


    The temperature was still a balmy 3.5 degrees Centigrade when 60.ID started its conquest of Podkhozheye, but any hope of a quick victory before the weather deteriorated are slipping fast. Initially it looked as though Mitrofanov’s 9th Tankovaya would fold easily, but Soviet reinforcements arrived in the form of 134th Strelkovaya. Nevertheless, General von Sodenstern has told his Korps commander, von Reichenau, that the battle is progressing well. That is just as well, as Polen Army Nord has so many battles raging at the moment that any help is unlikely.

    One battle at least is over, but it is unlikely that this will lead to any divisions being available for combat in the near future. Von Both’s Plavsk adventure cost us 1,300 lives and exhausted his own 68.ID which is now 1,000 men short of its full complement. Both it and von Buhle’s 102.ID (mot) are dangerously low on supplies. With the current demands on the supply network, it could be some time for both men and stores to be replaced.

    Lack of possible reinforcements did not make von Wietersheim hesitate: 11.ID marched straight into Davydovo. He had judged correctly, however, that Shlemin’s men were in state to put up a fight. 169th Strelkovaya, the front division, was on its last legs and the reserve unit, 41st Strelkovaya, was just as badly affected by recent fighting and bombing. Just before the end of the month the Russians broke and Davydovo was ours.

    Stupino, the battle that began as a minor clash on the 25th, turned out to be a magnet for troops of both sides. Division after division was thrown into the province just outside Moskva. Perhaps Stavka had a faint hope of using Stupino as a launch point for an attempt to retake the capital. By the time von Manstein declared fighting over, nearly 90,000 men had been committed to the battle. It was costly for the Soviets: their losses were more than double ours.


    Polen Army Sud (Rommel)



    General Rommel also received new orders: his army is to head for Rjazan’ and Pechernicki. Hansen was ordered to advance into Zaraysk, adjacent to Rjazan’ but held by 32,000 Russians. Any concerns that Hansen had about challenging such a force with his 10,000 motorised infantry were soon dispelled. While comparatively few in numbers, 161.ID (mot) had a huge advantage in skill, experience and most importantly, confidence. It suffered more losses than the Russians, but it took Zaraysk in less than a day.

    1st leichte Panzer had a flurry of excitement when it was ordered to take Tula but the attack was poorly planned and lack of supplies led to it being called off in just a couple of hours. An embarrassment for General Keppler but casualties were very low and he got away with his mistake. Had he not called off the attack so quickly, things might have got a bit dangerous and not only for his men. OKH is taking a very hard approach to commanders who are reckless.



    Soviet riflemen lie in wait in Tula: Keppler soon realised his division was not ready for a street battle


    A more serious attack on Tula began early on 30th October. General von Sponeck was in charge and was given command of 43.ID as well as his own 4th Panzer Division. His opposition is two rifle divisions led by General Belous, who has made sure that his men are fully rested and that ammunition is plentiful. Early indications are that this will be a long, drawn-out battle. No doubt the Russians hope to hold out until the snows reach this area.


    Balkans Army (Guderian)



    Although things had not started well for General Petersen in Pokrovskoye, he was able to steady his men and on the 27th could announce he had finally cleared the forests of enemy soldiers. Even with the arrival of a cavalry division, Sharokhin could not hold off 386.ID (mot) assisted by 35.ID.

    Late on the 26th the Balkans Army HQ got the message they had been waiting for: we had at last taken Staryj Oskol. After 10 days the Red Army had cracked and the bloodshed was over. 10th Panzer, which had begun the battle, had been withdrawn days ago, its supplies and men exhausted, but Crüwell’s 13th Panzer had taken up the burden and despite the Soviets throwing up to 50,000 men into the cauldron, had simply outfought Ratnikov’s men. Whatever the reason, I am sure Guderian is glad it is over.

    With Moskva now firmly held by our troops, the spotlight swung back to the Balkans Army when the news broke that Kharkov had fallen. Was it only the 14th when Herzog first took 36.ID (mot) into the city? 12 days of deadly street fighting took its toll on both us Germans and our Italian allies. The Russians, who never numbered more than a couple of divisions, made our men pay for every street and every suburb. But they could not stop the inexorable advance. 26.ID (mot) which stayed in the battle the entire time, is to be congratulated on its performance.

    The drive to the Don continued. Altrichter and 107.ID pushed into Grunin Vorgol but were soon halted as they ran into General Kamenev with an armoured division and nearly 30,000 infantry. None of the enemy units were in very good condition, but sheer numbers and firepower were enough to force Altrichter to proceed cautiously.

    Slightly to the south, Höpner and 4th leichte Panzer had a similar experience, with Horolenko and two divisions holding up the tanks in Evlanovo.



    Wrecked vehicles of 2nd Panzer Divsion


    While it was accepted soon after the battle for Dolgoye began on the 15th that it would be a tough fight, few expected that it would last so long and be so expensive. Had that been known, Balkans Army HQ may have overridden 2nd Panzerkorps. As it is, 2nd Panzer Division is unfit for further action, with scores of tanks destroyed and more than 2,000 casualties. Volckers had already withdrawn 108.ID (mot) as he had run out of supplies. More than two weeks of continuous combat was more than we can ask of even our best units, at least when supply is so unreliable.


    Italian Expeditionary Army (Pintor)



    General Pinto managed to stir his generals into action, and Rossi launched 14a Divisione “Isonzo” against Katukov’s 29th “Sibivskaya” and 221st Motorizavannaya. His men were winning, but at a huge cost, when Herzog’s 36.ID (mot) lent a hand. (Needless to say Rossi’s official report simply mentions the presence of “other ground troops in the area). Regardless of who claims the credit, the end result is that the Russians were sent packing, though comparatively unharmed.


    Österreich Army (von Kluge)



    General von Kluge did not seek much publicity for his victory in Sakhnovskaya, and in fact I nearly missed the report. I can see why he didn’t want many to hear of it: General Kurte seems to have made a complete botch-up. We won the battle, but it took us ten days and nearly 1,700 casualties. Although not made clear, several other divisions must have been called into clean up the mess. 7th SS Freiwilligen Gebirgsjäger Division will take some weeks to recover fully. With the current emphasis on conserving men, everyone involved should be glad this has slipped through unnoticed (except by me).


    1 Hadtest (Shvoy)



    The Hungarians, newly arrived in the south, were tested when Semenchenko launched a sudden attack on Horlivka. Using a tank division supported by a motorised unit, the Russians pressed Bruswik’s 5th gyal. and 1st Tábori hard, but the Hungarians were not to be shifted easily. They had been given responsibility for the province and General Shvoy was keen to show his men could hold their own. The Soviet armour, usually up against the superior German panzers, relished the opportunity to take on the Hungarian Toldis. Miklós Toldi on his horse would have been about as useful as the 20mm guns, but the Hungarians gritted their teeth and took heavy casualties until the Russians pulled back. No-one knows why: it might have been that Soviet fuel is scarce since the loss of Moskva.

    What came next has embarrassed the whole Hungarian nation, up to Admiral Horthy himself. The key province of Horlivka was lost to the Soviets without a fight! Nobody knows what the real story is and finding the truth is impossible. Everyone involved is covering their tracks and it is easy for documents to “go missing’ in a war zone. As best as we can tell from Berlin, after the Russian armour retreated, Bruswick also ordered his men to pull back. (Given the damage his two divisions had suffered, this was understandable.) Due to some administrative failure, either at 1 Hadtest or II Állandó Hadsereg, no-one was told to take the place of the badly mauled defenders and before Shvoy or Werth could react there was an enemy division occupying the area. What a complete fiasco!



    Unopposed, a BT-7 and escorting infantry moves into Horlivka


    To make matters worse, a badly planned counter-attack was beaten off in less than an hour. 2 Páncéloshados was no match for the Russian tanks it found: 17th Tankovaya had been resupplied and rested and was waiting for them.

    It is unlikely that the attack on Barvinkove was staged to divert attention from the shambles to the south, but the timing was perfect. Govondy-Novák took four Hungarian infantry divisions forward and took no risks. His 28,000 men were too much for the single Soviet rifle division and in just over a day Shvoy could announce a Hungarian victory, a victory achieved with no German assistance.


    Ukraine Army (Höhne)



    4th schwere Panzer Division, still awaiting its new tanks, was able to push back the advancing Russians, though at some cost. The tank battle with 19th Tankovaya in Yakymivka was brutal and losses on both sides were heavy, but von Vietinghoff gennant Scheel’s men outlasted the Soviet tanks. It will be some time before they can continue their mission in the Crimea: they have been pulled back to Mykolayivk to recover and hopefully complete their refit.


    Spain



    On the 26th, we received word of an uprising in Verin, Galica. There are already a couple of areas of discontent in the region, but Berlin was assured by General von Rabenau that his Army of Iberia is responding, and that with the help of some Hungarians stationed nearby the matter would be sorted soon. By the 29th, although 198th Reserve Division reached Verin, the rebels had moved to Ourense.


    Finalised Battles for the period 25th to 31st October 1941

    Sakhnovshchyna: 1,693 (31,841): 947 (20,166)
    Kazin: 55 (49,984): 488 (9,902)
    1st Podporoz’e: 150 (19,990): 512 (15,995)
    1st Lesnoye: 77 (9,958): 103 (17,552)
    2nd Lesnoye: 793 (10,000): 556 (21,445)
    Shchelkovo: 43 (9,996): 87 (9,997)
    Staryj Oskol: 1,763 (29,995): 2,317 (50,850)
    Uglci: 321 (10,000): 267 (7,295)
    Zmyiyiv: 442 (23,589): 76 (15,421) (262 Italian)
    2nd Podporoz’e: 252 (19,990): 717 (17,783)
    Aleksin: 764 (39,970): 723 (46,463)
    Horlivka: 340 (11,995): 52 (17,852) (Hungarian)
    Kharkov: 1,182 (25,994): 1,135 (17,789) (120 Italian)
    Zaraysk: 201 (9,996): 131 (31,924)
    Kaljazin: 58 (9,991): 87 (15,292)
    Tula: 13 (9,789): 0 (16,783)
    Yakymivka: 755 (9,162): 715 (9,997)
    Gummala: 113 (19,994): 103 (14,978)
    Plavsk: 1,298 (19,426): 958 (54,047)
    Dolgoye: 3,366 (29,970): 3,270 (58,231)
    2nd Horlivka: 31 (5,995): 1 (10,000)
    Davydovo: 79 (9,991): 119 (13,054)
    Barvinkove: 106 (27,979): 108 (7,890) (Hungarian)
    Stupino: 969 (41,999): 1,901 (46,563)

    Total Battlefield Casualties for the period 25th to 31st October 1941

    Hungarian: 446
    Italian: 382
    German: 14,036
    Russian: 15,373

    Prior Casualties

    Hungarian: 2,784
    Italian: 7,230
    German: 381,258
    Russian: 422,534


    Total Battlefield Casualties to date

    Hungarian: 446 + 2,784 = 3,230
    Italian: 382 + 7,230 = 7,612
    German: 14,036 + 381,258 = 395,294
    Russian: 15,373 + 422,534 = 437,907



    Bombing Summary for the period 25th to 31st October 1941

    Luftwaffe

    Aleksin: Grauert with 3rd and 4th Kampffliegerkorps: 269, 269, 317, 312, 297 (1,464)
    Stupino: Keller with 1st and 7th Kampffliegerkorps: 311, 358, 290, 353, 324, 459 (2.095)
    Podporez’e: Wever with 8th Kampffliegerkorps: 257, 349, 181, 231, 336, 328 (1,682)
    Kimry: von Waldau with 4th Schlachtfliegerkorps: 144
    Plavsk: Weise with 5th Schlachtfliegerkorps: 209, 354, 287 (850)
    Stupino: Löhr with 2nd Schlachtfliegerkorps: 244, 180, 388, 359 (1,171)
    Uglic: Keller with 7th Kampffliegerkorps: 165, 153 (318)
    Stupino: von Waldau with 4th Schlachtfliegerkorps and 1st Kampffliegerkorps: 342
    Uglic: Keller with 3rd and 7th Kampffleigerkorps: 339
    Stupino: Löhr with 2nd and 4th Schlachtfliegerkorps: 372, 117, 215, 282, 238 (1,224)
    Kaljazin: Weise with 5th Schlachtkorps: 173, 199 (372)
    Uglic: Kitzinger with 3rd Kampffliegerkorps: 215, 399 (614)
    Plavsk: Grauert with 4th and 7th Kampffliegerkorps: 374, 342, 260, 283 (1,259)
    Novosomorsk: Weise with 5th Schlachtfliegerkorps: 256, 306, 200 (762)
    Gummala: Kitzinger with 3rd Kampffliegerkorps: 183, 344 (527)
    Podkhozkhoye: von Waldau with 4th Schlachtfliegerkorps: 73, 153, 124 (350)
    Gummala: Wirse with 5th Schlachtkorps: 81, 54 (135)
    Davydovo: Löhr with 2nd Schlachtfliegerkorps: 86, 180 (266)
    Novosomorsk: Grauert with 4th Kampffliegerkorps: 225, 287, 122 (634)
    Tula: Sperrle with 1st Kampffliegerkorps: 228, 396, 179 (803)
    Lesnoye: Keller with 7th Kampffliegerkorps: 143
    Lesnoye: Keller with 3rd and 7th Kampffliegerkorps: 424


    VVS

    Soviet aircraft managed one raid on Kolpny before being hit by 600 Messerschmitts led by Major General Fisser. 7th Jagdfliegerkorps was nearly untouched but 2nd Jagdfliegerkorps took heavy casualties: a quick check showed my brother Ernst was not among those listed as missing. His unit, JG 26 “Schlageter” is now down to 69 aircraft, but as far as I can see this is more a reflection of the difficulty of getting replacement aircraft to the front than of heavy fighting.

    Kolpny: Thor with 11th and 2nd ShAd: 91


    Total Bombing Casualties for the period 25th to 31st October 1941

    Hungarian: Nil
    Italian: Nil
    German: 91
    Russian: 15,918

    Prior Casualties

    Hungarian: 128
    Italian: 65
    German: 5,281
    Russian: 299,446

    Total Bombing Casualties to date

    Hungarian: Nil + 128 = 128
    Italian: Nil + 65 = 65
    German: 91 + 5,281 = 5,372
    Russian: 15,918 + 299,446 = 315,364


    The Eastern Front at end of 24th October 1941.



    OKH has noted a gap appearing in the north as differing objectives stretch our armies


    Total East Front Casualties for the period 19th to 24th October 1941

    Hungarian: 446 + Nil = 446
    Italian: 382 + Nil = 382
    German: 14,036 + 91 = 14,127
    Russian: 15,373 + 15,918 = 31,291

    Prior Casualties

    Hungarian: 2,902
    Italian: 7,295
    German: 386,539
    Russian: 721,980

    Total East Front casualties to date

    Hungarian: 446 + 2,902 = 3,348
    Italian: 382 + 7,295 = 7,677
    German: 14,127 + 386,539 = 400,666
    Russian: 31,291 + 721,980 = 753,271


    U-boat Activity for the period 1st to 31st October 1941 (all sinkings are UK transports unless otherwise noted)

    Unit successes
    Patrol Zone

    1st Unterseebootsflotte (Aßmann) 1 (+1 Canadian) Southern Cape Verde Terrace
    2nd Unterseebootsflotte (Dönitz) 2 Northern Bay of Biscay
    3rd Unterseebootsflotte (Fricke) 6 (+2 Irish escorts) Eastern Charcot Seamount
    4th Unterseebootsflotte (Wolf) 3 Horseshoe Seamount
    5th Unterseebootsflotte (Krause) 2 Central Atlantic Fracture Zone
    II Unterseebootsflotte (von Nordeck) 2 Eastern Biscay Plain

    Total sinkings are 17 transports (1 Canadian) and 2 Irish Escorts



    Far out at sea, a newsreel is prepared for the public back in the Reich


    I hear there is alarm at OKW at the drop in sinkings. We feel sure that the British are still running a massive merchant navy: we are just not as efficient as we were. Our technology is getting old, but we still have few losses. In fact, even von Nordeck’s elderly coastal boats are able to get the odd transport.

    There is a growing conviction in OKM that the problem is our tactics. We are still being cautious in our attacks, our policy from the beginning of the war. Perhaps we should direct our Kapitans to be more aggressive? If we do this, however, can we absorb the possible losses? Our economy is already groaning under the combined effect of losses in the East and the cost of upgrading the primitive road and rail in Poland and Russia. If U-boats were lost, would they ever be replaced? Should we divert more of our research to naval matters? (There is an undercurrent here of deeper political purposes. Some very high-ranking officers and party officials are pushing for increases in naval technology, not all of it related to our U-boots. I am getting concerned that there are things happening that I don’t know about).



    Axis Allies: Situation as of 31st October 1941

    Italy

    Large numbers of Italian troops remain in Greece. There are no reports of any activity on either side. I have seen a few memos going to the office of the Foreign Minister, Joachim von Ribbentrop, suggesting that the Luftwaffe may be able to send some bombers south during the winter in Russia. The hope is that this might stimulate the Italians to action. We have directly asked them to capture Athina but this has not convinced them to attack.



    They have shown a bit more fortitude in North Africa. Or perhaps I should say the Middle East. Two armour divisions are across the Suez and the British and Iraqi forces seem weak. We have asked the Italians to aim for Tel Aviv/Yafo. If they can take that then Egypt and the Suez Canal should be secure.


    Japan



    In the all important Chinese theatre, the slow advance continues. The supply problems that damaged the Imperial Japanese Army for so long are a thing of the past: supply is plentiful.



    The situation in Indo-China has improved somewhat, as supplies have started to arrive in Saigon. Not enough to make the defenders along the coast confident, but enough to make complete collapse unlikely. There is some concern about General Takumi and his two divisions who have been cut off from Saigon, but he is in no immediate danger.

    What interested several officers I know in the Kriegsmairine was the change in location of the Imperial Japanese Navy. The carrier fleets have all returned to Japan, together with about half the surface fleet. A very strong fleet under Admiral Kaga is in the Kwajalein area – about 20 ships. Nobody knows why. What are the Japanese up to?
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  5. #2905
    Lt. General Uriah's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by arkham1010 View Post
    Dude, seriously, take a long as you need. This is just a video game. RL comes first.
    Quote Originally Posted by Monzach View Post
    I really sympathize with your situation, Uriah. I hope that the situation isn't too much for you and your family. Please, take as much time as you need. I'm sure that all of us will be here whenever you have the time and the energy to continue with this wonderful AAR.
    Quote Originally Posted by Sarayakat View Post
    This. Looking forward to your next update. Be well. They don't really seem to make an appropriate smiley for this sort of thing...
    Quote Originally Posted by Dasfubar View Post
    My condolences. Take as much time as you need, your family comes first.
    Quote Originally Posted by Krogzar View Post
    I'm rly sorry to hear that Uriah! I hope all the best for you and your family and much strength to go trough it all!

    my thoughts are with you and a big manly hug from holland

    Thanks for all the kind wishes. Unfortunately my wife's mother died a few weeks ago and this has led me to put computer games a fair bit lower on the priority list.

    Now of course I am back at Uni and grappling with Ancient Greek (hard) and Latin (easy), and struggling with the amount of reading required for Ancient Epic. But I am getting organised and should be able to post semi-regularly. (No promises- I have a major court case next month). I wrote most of this before I played November, but things might get interesting soon.

  6. #2906
    Private Monzach's Avatar

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    A new update, huzzah! I definetly enjoy these, almost as much as I enjoy playing the game myself.

    On to business:
    I'm definetly liking the way the situation is developing in Karelia. You should be able to decimate the defenses of Murmansk before long and gain another access point to the Arctic Ocean (Who knows what wonders the Thule Society will unearth in the frozen north? :O).

    In the South I hope you're making plans for the invasion of Sevastopol, as the "City of St. Sebastian" is a key naval base for whichever side controls it. That being said, the push towards Rostov-na-Donu is paramount.

    And what of the Centre? Well...I'm sure they will keep on pushing towards the Volga, and eventually Stalin's City itself.

    I also like the situation on the Suez, as the Italians are helping to cut off supplies for the African Colonial troops that the Brits are no doubt using.

    Anyways, it's great to see that you're back Uriah. I do hope that youur studies are proceding well.

  7. #2907
    Saver of the World robw963's Avatar
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    It's amazing that you were able to pull off an update under stressful circumstances at home. I'll also mention I've been lurking and following your AAR for quite awhile now and want to say how impressive and enjoyable your hyper-detailed approach has been to read. *back to lurking*

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  8. #2908
    Lt. General Uriah's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Monzach View Post
    A new update, huzzah! I definetly enjoy these, almost as much as I enjoy playing the game myself.

    On to business:
    I'm definetly liking the way the situation is developing in Karelia. You should be able to decimate the defenses of Murmansk before long and gain another access point to the Arctic Ocean (Who knows what wonders the Thule Society will unearth in the frozen north? :O).

    In the South I hope you're making plans for the invasion of Sevastopol, as the "City of St. Sebastian" is a key naval base for whichever side controls it. That being said, the push towards Rostov-na-Donu is paramount.

    And what of the Centre? Well...I'm sure they will keep on pushing towards the Volga, and eventually Stalin's City itself.

    I also like the situation on the Suez, as the Italians are helping to cut off supplies for the African Colonial troops that the Brits are no doubt using.

    Anyways, it's great to see that you're back Uriah. I do hope that youur studies are proceding well.
    I am moving more troops, especially panzers and mobile units, to the south. The big problem is the crap infrastructure. Units attack and then take forever to recover. When using Army AI units are not selected to attack until pretty neat 100%. Slow repair and resupply rates mean you need a lot of units at various stages of recovery. Still I have a lot of infra work on so the situation should improve slowly.

    I'm afraid most other areas will have to slow down. i just don't have enough men to keep attacking everywhere in bad weather/low supply.

    As for studies: I fear that I and the Greek verb structure circa 1 AD are destined to remain strangers for some time.

    Quote Originally Posted by robw963 View Post
    It's amazing that you were able to pull off an update under stressful circumstances at home. I'll also mention I've been lurking and following your AAR for quite awhile now and want to say how impressive and enjoyable your hyper-detailed approach has been to read. *back to lurking*
    It is not the stress (I find writing these relaxing) it is the time. And don't knock lurking. I was a lurker for years, and still read quite afew blogs/threads on this and other games, both computer and board.

    "Hyper detailed" : a fair description. Did you know hyper is a Greek word? (See I have learnt some Greek. Note that "hyper" is not a verb).



    I must apologise - while writing 1-4 Nov I realised that the photo for "Nord" in the last post was the "final' version, not the annotated "end" version. Sorry about that - fixed now.

    Hope for next update in a day or so. "Hope for" not "Promise"

  9. #2909
    Private Monzach's Avatar

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    Uriah: I figured that the attack would have to slow down for resupply and repairs. I just hope that you'll be able to push a little further before winter hits with full force and you have to rest your armies for most of the time.

    Incidentally, I find it quite funny that Sevastopol is named after the patron saint of soldiers.

    As for your problems with the Ancient Greek verb-structurem, I'm sure that you'll get the hang of it. After all, it can't be that much more complicated than the alphabet!

  10. #2910
    Seems you're not far from breaking the Soviets.

    After that, however, what's the big plan? You'll have a lot of unhappy territory to hold down, and the Royal Navy is still pretty much wholly intact, to say nothing of whatever the Americans have. I foresee a nice big ol' naval war in the Atlantic, but I fear it could be anticlimatic; the British AI in vanilla is horrendous at actually defending Britain on land; they like to ship all their troops overseas.

    I've been playing a lot of Darkest Hour recently, and the allied AI is much more effective at defending the British isles, and naval invasions in general. Heck, playing Japan can actually be hard sometimes due to effective counter-invasions and coastal defenses, but then they're using the much simpler HoI2 ground combat mechanics, likely easier to tell the AI to hold down the coast and counter attack/encircle effectively.

  11. #2911
    Colonel superjames1992's Avatar
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    It's really amazing how long you have kept this going, man.

  12. #2912
    Field Marshal jju_57's Avatar
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    Just think come October it will be three full years that this AAR has been going on. In a way Uriah has caught up the the actual timeframe of the real war.
    My mom always told me to be nicer. She said that I could catch more flies with sugar than vinegar. But I always found that a big pile of dog poop worked best.

  13. #2913
    Lt. General Uriah's Avatar
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    A Clerk’s War



    Saturday 1st to Tuesday 4th November 1941

    A tumultuous few days here in Berlin, and it looks as though the frenzy will continue for a while. I have to go to the Reichskanzlei quite often and it is like an anthill after cave in. Hundreds of men and women rushing around, with dozens running to and from the Foreign Ministry around the corner at 76 Wilhelmstraße. Chaos, but a sort of organised chaos. Not a lot of facts, but that is offset by plenty of rumours.

    The month started with a small surprise. Since the start of Unternehmen Barbarossa, not one unit has been singled out for recognition. Now the Führer has decided that the performance of 36.ID (mot) in the battle for Kharkov was so outstanding that it should be acknowledged by the Reich. From now on it will be known as the “Kharkov” division.



    A few men from 36.ID were in Berlin for various reasons and commandeered a truck to celebrate. Somewhere a marching band is missing its instruments.


    The real excitement started though when the expected reorganisation of the eastern armies took place. Those interested in the internal politics of the Party (which is about 99% of Berlin!) scoured the announcements to see if they could deduce which stars were rising and falling, who might a good contact and who should probably be avoided.

    The first announcement was that the 1st Fallschirmjägerkorps was to leave the Baltic Army and move south. Rail transport was available for an immediate departure for Odessa. Before anyone could read too much into this, Kesselring’s good standing was confirmed by the news that the paratroopers were to be replaced with 5 infantry divisions: von Falkenhorst’s I Armeekorps. 1, 11, 21, 62 and 72.ID are to march north as soon as possible. (Some are still engaged in fighting).

    Some saw this as a criticism of General von Manstein, but I can’t agree. The three major armies on the east are to remain as they are, though all are to be renamed. Von Manstein’s Polen Nord Army is to be simply “Nord”, “Polen Sud” will be renamed “Mitte” and Guderian’s “Balkan Army” will become “Sud”. It is clear to me that OKH has determined that these three armies will remain the foundation of our Eastern forces, and that the nomenclature adopted is to reflect the equal status of the three commanders. And OKH would not have made this decision without I tbeing approved, if only tacitly, buy the Reichskanzslei.

    What really got things moving, however, was the news from the Foreign Office on late on Monday. I was actually at home and relaxing with a coffee while listening to the wireless when the music was interrupted by a news bulletin. After an appropriately rousing musical introduction, the announcement was made. Our allies, the Japanese, had declared war on not only the British and the
    Commonwealth, but also on the United States of America! My shock was so severe that I uttered an oath my father had used in times of stress, bringing a stern look from Gisela. (Did I mention that to save travelling time Gisela had left her parent’s home in the suburbs? And that as I had a spare room I had offered to take her in as a lodger? Perhaps not: one does not want to broadcast small acts of human kindness.)

    There was not a lot of detail in the announcement, a bit about the noble Emperor and the oppression of the British and the Americans. One thing was clear though: this was a purely Japanese affair. While the Japanese are members of the Axis with Italy, Hungary and our other allies, the declaration of war was by the Japanese government alone, a war limited practically to the Pacific. That was a relief: I knew only too well the pressure the Reich is under with the war in the east.

    At work very early the next day I dashed from group to group standing discussion the events. One hears a lot as a filing administrator. People can’t simply order you away – they don’t want to upset you and find all their documents missing. So even the more aristocratic Junkers army officers just ignored me and kept talking.

    The general view was that this could be a good thing. The Imperial Japanese Navy would tie up a few more Royal Navy units, though nearly all Kriegsmarine officers felt that the massive guns of the US Pacific Fleet would soon drive the Japanese back to their home islands. The major ports of Singapore and Manila Bay would allow the two enemy navies to move close and attack the IJN in the Sea of Japan. On land, Hong Kong and a few other ports might be taken, but it would distract the United States away from Europe.

    Only a few of the younger naval officers looked concerned. I took the opportunity to speak with a couple later and heard that a section of OKM was sure that the IJN’s large number of aircraft carriers would lead to a new style of naval warfare, one where the sheer weight of the US battleships might not prevail.

    Of course the most immediate impact was on the Foreign Office. Minister von Ribbentrop was a very early visitor to the Reichskanzlei, and nobody thinks he went too willingly. My sources tell me he was in with the Führer for some time and that even the heavy doors of the office could not prevent some of the raised voices being heard. One of the poker faced SS guards reportedly snorted with laughter at one point and wisely pretended to faint. It is not a good look for the Foreign Office to find out about such things from the Japanese ambassador to Berlin. No doubt my old chef, Minister for Intelligence Wilhem Frick, has had a heart to heart with the Führer as well.



    Minister von Ribbentrop looking suitably chastised for the failure of his ministry to know what the Japanese were up to.


    Life (and death) goes on, however, and despite the political excitement, aircraft land every few hours with documents from the Front, the wires run hot with telegrams and the decoders are flat out with radio messages to and from the various headquarters.


    Baltic Army (Kesselring)



    It did not take General Kesselring long to use his newly acquired forces. Von Falkenhorst was instructed to take Lesnoye and he promptly instructed Pfeffer to get moving. By 6AM on the 4th 21.ID had a tactical plan drawn up and the lead units were in contact with a previously unknown enemy division: 3rd “Tihookeanskaya”. From all reports it is a brand new unit, well equipped and at full strength. The Russians are not beaten if they still have the capacity to create new forces.


    Army Nord (von Manstein)



    True to his word, General von Sodenstern did put down all resistance in Podkhozheye without having to call for ground reinforcements. (He was greatly helped by von Waldau’s Stukas who flew four missions to assist him). 60.ID was unable to occupy the province as it was too worn out, and so Brandt’s 104.ID (mot) moved in.

    The security zone around Moskva increased with the rapid capture of Nagor’e by 8.ID. The dawn attack prepared by General Feige worked like clockwork, and in less than 18 hours and a handful of casualties General Ponedelin and his men were gone. As in Podkhozheye, the intervention of Stukas (this time Löhr’s 2nd Schlachtfliegerkorps) was gratefully received.

    There was some confusion at OKH when a message came in from von Manstein’s HQ that the assault on Rostov had started. What was going on? Then it was realised that the message referred to the province of Rostov, south of Jaroslavl. It was a measure of the importance of the battle that command was given to Kreß von Kressestein, with General von der Chevallerie as his deputy. Berzarin had 25,000 men when the battle started, but this was soon increased to more than 35,000. The outcome should not be in doubt, however, as the bulk of the Russians are tired and low on morale. Berzarin seems to have acknowledged this, fighting a delaying action.

    Sometime before dawn, von Manstein authorised von Reichenau’s XIII Armeekorps to send 73.ID into Noginsk. 74th Strelkovaya was not expected to last long, but General Brennecke reports that the newfound determination of the Soviet soldiers is again delaying his advance. His losses are mounting but he is confident that his men are making the Russians pay. Victory will just be delayed a little.


    Army Mitte (Rommel)



    Von Sponeck’s more measured approach to the capture of Tula paid off. He had only a few thoudand men more than Belous, but the persistence of 43.ID backed by the guns of 4th PzD meant that the Soviets were pushed further and further east until the city was ours.

    As a sign of the level of co-operation that remains after the reorganisation of the armies, 4th Panzer has been sent to assist Armee Nord in Novosomorsk. That battle is looking increasingly grim.

    Rommel must have given his commanders a directive to clear the Moskva region, as Frießner had not only his own 103.ID (mot) but also Steiner’s 3rd PzD with which to take Lyubertsy. 22,000 men and a mass of armour to attack 4th “Smolenskaya”, a division with less than 7,000 men! Needless to say, the battle did not last long.

    North of Lyubertsy, Müller and 10.ID (mot) found conditions a bit tougher in Aleksandrov. At first all was well. The Soviet commander, Kotlyanov, even with 2 rifle divisions, could not stop the rush of infantry backed by heavy artillery and by midnight Müller was claiming victory. He was a little too early – at noon on Tuesday his men were in action again, as General Kirponos moved 62nd “Turkestanskaya” into the area.



    A Czech made 305mm “Morser”(t) gun (probably captured in Yugoslavia) fires on a town in Aleksandrov. Though really siege artillery, the 295kg shells are effective at persuading Soviets to abandon their fortified buildings.


    The forested region of Pereslavl’-Zalesskiy held up 8th PzD for a day. The Russian defenders, 193rd Strelkovaya, could not do more than snipe at the advancing tanks, inflicting a few casualties. Then they retreated, perhaps unwilling to face the armour until they have more support.


    Army Sud (Guderian)



    More and more out commanders are reporting that the units facing them are in better condition than we have seen for weeks. General Schack, in charge of the operation to take Efremov, had found the going very tough, with both 36th Zabejskal’skaya and 224th Strelkovaya showing plenty of fight. In fact, after four days 106.ID (mot) has made very little progress, and late on Tuesday was subject to a strong counter-attack.

    Herzog and the recently honoured “Kharkov” division had their chance to show their mettle again when they clashed with two motorised rifle divisions in Balakliya. As might be expected for a unit with a reputation for tough fighting, Balakliya would not be a push-over. Katukov is one of the better Soviet leaders and both his divisions were well equipped and supplied. Even when 74.ID joined the battle by attacking from the south, the Russians fought on.



    Soviet motorised troops (in GAZ-MM trucks) move to the front


    More tales of stubborn Soviet resistance came from General Altrichter in Grunin Vorgol. Admittedly 107.ID (mot) was trying to shift 70,000 men from the province, but for troops with little more than few rounds of ammunition each the Russians proved quite resourceful. Nothing Altrichter could do worked until he received another division to assist: at that point the enemy broke. It was an expensive win, however, with Altrichter losing more than 1,000 men.


    I Hadtest (Shvoy)



    If General Shvoy thought that the resounding victory in Barvinkove a few days ago meant that he could now forget that province, where administrative incompetence caused him so much embarrassment, then he was wrong. A single Hungarian division (16 gyaloghadosztály) had been left to hold Barvinkove and the Russians struck again. Initially just one rifle division attacked, but by Monday morning 25,000 Soviet troops were engaged. Outnumbered and running out of ammunition, General Domaniczky had no choice but to order a retreat.

    Later on Monday Gorondy-Novák tried to block the advancing Russians, but his single divisions was just shrugged off. Only at 4PM were the Hungarians sufficiently organised to co-ordinate a mass assault. General Beregffry was able to attack from three directions simultaneously. The battle still rages, with the Hungarians mounting an assault in the hope of crippling the will of the Russians.


    Finalised battles for the period 1st to 4th November 1941

    Tula: 332 (19,262): 360 (16,780)
    Podkhozheye: 352 (9,990): 309 (20,316)
    1st Barvinkove: 116 (8,000): 128 (25,294) (Hungarian)
    Nagor’e: 33 (9,992): 73 (9,684)
    Lyubertsy: 4 (21,982): 31 (6,874)
    2nd Barvinkove: 12 (5,967): 1 (7,643) (Hungarian)
    1st Aleksandrov: 47 (9,996): 91 (18710)
    Perseslavl’-Zalesskiy: 28 (12,000): 95 (8,553)

    Total Battlefield Casualties for the period 1st to 4th November 1941

    Hungarian: 128
    Italian: Nil
    German: 796
    Russian: 1,088

    Prior Casualties

    Hungarian: 3,230
    Italian: 7,612
    German: 395,294
    Russian: 437,907

    Total Battlefield Casualties to date

    Hungarian: 128 + 3,230 = 3,358
    Italian: Nil + 7,612 = 7,612
    German: 796 + 395,294 = 396,090
    Russian: 1,088 + 437,907 = 438,995


    Bombing Summary for the period 1st to 4th November 1941

    Luftwaffe

    Podkhozheye: von Waldau with 4th Schlachtfliegerkorps: 45
    Novosomorsk: Grauert with 4th Kampffliegerkorps: 348, 315 (663)
    Nagor’e: Löhr with 2nd Schlachtfliegerkorps: 145
    Novosomorsk: von Waldau with 4th Schlachtfliegerkorps: 63, 168, 157 (388)
    Lyubertsy: Weise with 5th Schlachtfliegerkorps: 111
    Rostov: Keller with 7th Kampffliegerkorps: 190
    Rostov: Weise with 5th Schlachtfliegerkorps: 73
    Novosomorsk: Sperrle with 1st Kampffliegerkorps: 280, 441 (721)
    Rostov: Löhr with 2nd Schalachtfliegerkorps: 146, 119, 43, 70, 51 (429)
    Aleksandrov: Keller with 7th Kampffliegerkorps: 119
    Pereslavl’-Zalesskiy: Keller with 7th Kampffliegerkorps: 93, 118 (211)
    Novosomorsk: Sperrle with 1st Kampffliegerkorps: 386
    Lesnoye: Wever with 8th Kampffliegerkorps: 299, 158 (457)
    Novosomorsk: Grauert with 1st and 4th Kampffliegerkorps: 515
    Aleksandrov: Kitzinger with 3rd Kampffliegerkorps: 119


    VVS

    Army Sud was taken aback by the ferocity of an attack by Russian bombers. Petersen’s 22.ID was rocked by the losses but the sight of the “Udet”, “Pik As” and “Paul Bäumer” jagdgeschwader tearing into the Yak-4s might have cheered them a little. Rychgov’s planes did not return, and left several dozen aircraft behind.



    The crew of this Yak-4 were able to land safely, unlike most of the others hit by our fighters.


    The VVS also intervened at Pavlohrad, where Falaleev tried to clear the skies over the Hungarian ground troops attacking Barvinkove. After two fairly equal battles against the Hungarian Bf 109Es, the arrival of Christiansen’s three Bf 109F geschwader tipped the odds. The Russian MiGs, now outnumbered and outclassed, abandoned their mission.



    A Hungarian Messerschmitt makes its way back to base at Odessa


    The other air battle was over Kaljazin. 6th BAD tried to bomb marshalling areas for the attack on Rostov, but a prompt response from Waber’s 6th Jagdfliegerkorps (now based at Moskva) ensured not a single soldier was affected.

    Livny: Rychagov with 1 and 2 BAD: 167


    Total Bombing Casualties for the period 25th to 31st October 1941

    Hungarian: Nil
    Italian: Nil
    German: 167
    Russian: 4,572

    Prior Casualties

    Hungarian: 128
    Italian: 65
    German: 5,372
    Russian: 315,364

    Total Bombing Casualties to date

    Hungarian: Nil + 128 = 128
    Italian: Nil + 65 = 65
    German: 167 + 5,372 = 5,539
    Russian: 315,364 + 4,572 = 319,936


    Spain



    The fast moving rebel army moved from Ourense to Vigo, with 5th Kavellerie hot on their tails and 148 Reserve Division behind them. General Goeritz insisted his horsemen would catch the enemy militia, but von Rabenau, as commander of the Army of Iberia the man responsible for crushing the insurrection, was taking no chances. General Haase had been ordered to take 7.ID from La Coruna to be the anvil to Goeritz’s hammer. 10,000 regular infantry will be more than a match for a few peasants.




    East Front as at the end of 4th November 1941


    Total East Front Casualties for the period 19th to 24th October 1941

    Hungarian: 128 + Nil = 128
    Italian: Nil + Nil = Nil
    German: 796 + 167 = 963
    Russian: 1,088 + 4,572 = 5,660

    Prior Casualties

    Hungarian: 3,348
    Italian: 7,677
    German: 400,666
    Russian: 753,271

    Total East Front casualties to date

    Hungarian: 128 + 3,348 = 3,472
    Italian: Nil + 7,677 = 7,677
    German: 963 + 400,666 = 401,629
    Russian: 5,660 + 753,271 = 758,931


    Postscript

    As I finished writing my journal late on the 4th November, with the radio on very quietly (Gisela was already asleep – I wait until she goes to bed before getting my journal out of its hiding place, as I don’t want to alarm her with my illegal and life-threatening activities), I was jerked into attention. The announcer had interrupted the program of light music with a warning that the Füher was to make an announcement. At 11PM at night! This had to be important.

    It was. The Japanese declaration of war must have been all President Roosevelt needed to swing Congress his way. It has voted to join the Allies.

    Germany is now at war with the USA.



    Will we look back at this moment in dread? President Roosevelt signs the declaration of war on Germany
    Last edited by Uriah; 14-08-2012 at 10:16.

  14. #2914
    Field Marshal Baltasar's Avatar
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    How far are the Russians on the surrender scale?

  15. #2915
    Field Marshal jju_57's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Baltasar View Post
    How far are the Russians on the surrender scale?
    Very far as you need Stalingrad and many VP's in the Cacaus region to trigger it.
    My mom always told me to be nicer. She said that I could catch more flies with sugar than vinegar. But I always found that a big pile of dog poop worked best.

  16. #2916
    With the US involved its going to get real ugly real fast. I hope there is going to be some bomber defense built, and time to start bolstering defensive units in Spain, since the Allies will probably want to land there.

    Things in Russia better wrap up quickly so forces can be shifted back to the west. I'd say he's got maybe 6-9 months before things start to get REALLY ugly.

  17. #2917
    great update, so the sleeping giant finally awakes *shiver*
    I hope russia falls soon, what's their national unity? And how far is your progress?

    I noticed a spelling mistake:
    Von Sponeck’s more measured approach to the capture of Tula paid off. He had only a few thoudand men more than Belous, but the persistence of 43.ID backed by the guns of 4th PzD meant that the Soviets were pushed further and further east until the city was ours.

    *edit: I shouldn't try coding html*
    Originally Posted by Remble in his AAR The Setting Sun - Gotterdammerung, Japan 1944. (Writer missing in action)

    "What about the Pacific?" asked Hideki.
    "Oh I forgot. The Pacific is a large body of water. We own it. No one is trying to dispute that fact." Tanigawa answered with a grin.
    "I am so glad I asked. Please continue Minister Satoru."


    If you like reading, try Uriahs HOI3 AAR

    "Rank and File: A clerk's war Germany 1936 (ver 1.4)" (stopped)

  18. #2918
    General Forster's Avatar
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    My sympathy for your loss. I was happy to see another update. Why the heck are you learning Greek, anyway?
    I think Arkham1010 is probably right, you are going to have to beef up your fighters, aa and coastal defenses. At least with the Med stoppered, you won't have to worry about Italy getting knocked out and facing a southern front. Looks like you are now seeing the Siberian units? It was too bad Japan didn't attack the Soviet Union, it would have helped.
    You should be able to hold on through this winter and start your spring offensive in relatively good shape as well as a great position.
    Great having you back.

  19. #2919
    Lt. General Uriah's Avatar
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    First, apologies to all for not replying to the posts above.

    I recently spent a week in court and preparation for that has occupied me completely, to the extent I had to drop a unit from my studies.

    Sadly, I have come to the conclusion I have run out of enthusiasm for my nameless clerk - writing this AAR has got harder and harder and now is close to a chore. Maybe three years is too long!

    I started this AAR as a form of recuperation after suffering a work-related depressive breakdown. Over time it gave me confidence that I could still do things, and that there was more to life to lying around in bed. You could get up and play computer wargames for one! And people were interested enough to read what happened. But time has moved on and other things take up a lot of my time. The conclusion of my breach of contract case against my insurance coy (in which this AAR scored a mention) was a good point to re-evaluate what I was doing.

    So, unfair though it is, we will never know if the US Marine Corps storm ashore in France, and whether the Russians can recover over winter and push back the invaders.

    I suspect that the Ivans are too far gone and that the Reich will be able to hold the beaches, but who knows?

    One thing is for sure, it was never in the plan for the narrator to get killed. He and Gisela were fated to survive and live happily ever after. (His brothers may not have been so lucky)


    Thank you all for your encouragement, your help and your support. You have no idea how it helps the writer of an AAR to know that someone is reading his/her story.

    PS As some of the more perspicacious of you may have noticed, I have acquired a copy of TFH which I have been playing recently. Strangely I have a compulsion to start a new saga, but this time more detailed (Only joking!). I see a dark room deep in the fastnessses of the Reichskanzlei where a mysterious figure is devising plots for world dominination. So it is not beyond the bounds of possibility that a new AAR may rise from the ashes of "Rank and File". But no promises.

    PPS Those of you who looked at my board game AAR may have noticed it too stopped. I think my opponent will insist that we resume play in a week or two.

  20. #2920
    Second Lieutenant Stabber's Avatar
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    Thank you for this AAR. It was the one that hooked me on the AAR concept.

    Your AAR has inspired me to explore the numbers behind it all and more importantly influenced me to try to play with AI control.

    Thanks.

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