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Thread: The Safavid Empire - The Rising Sun

  1. #141
    This Safi's yellow in more than actions. His yellow stats are an affront to Abbas' memory! Woe!
    "Oppurtunistic relations can hardly be kept constant. The acquaintance of honorable people, even at a distance, does not add flowers in times of warmth and does not change it's leaves in times of cold: it continues unfading over the four seasons, becomes increasingly stable as it passes through ease and danger." - Zhuge Liang, Prime Minister of Shu-Han

  2. #142
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    Thanks Swert and Nobegow.

    Hadn't actually noticed that about the stats until now Kara. He really is the Yellow Shah - maybe I'll give him some yellow robes sometime soon!

  3. #143
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    Shah Safi – A New Hope (1633 – 1637)


    Bringing the Kakheti under Safavid rule was a great victory for Safi’s way of thinking. He badly needed a lifeline to save his reign as Shah as at the rate he was going he would have been removed by the military. His lack of action over Abbas’ death was still a matter of personal shame for many generals. After securing the northern border though there was growing sympathy among the court for Safi’s rule. Perhaps it was time to embrace a new kind of ruler – after all they hadn’t actually lost anything to the Uzbeks.

    It only took another year of Safi’s rule quash any hope of Safi making it as Shah. In January of 1634 a Mughal diplomat arrived at the court in Isfahan. At this point the emissary usually brought out chests full of spices and other riches as tribute to their Safavids overlords. The friendship between the two nations had for a long time looked unbreakable. Even when the Shiite Alliance fell to pieces the Mughals stuck by the Safavids and in turn whenever trouble broke out in India the Safavids would aid their servants. Unfortunately for Safi it turned out that the Mughals were in fact nasty little backstabbing people who were waiting as patiently snakes to strike.

    The diplomat informed Safi that no tribute would be coming to Isfahan his year – nor the year after. His emperor in Kabul now viewed their relationship to be more a ‘mutual friendship’ then vassal based.


    Things in the east get worse


    Safi, predictably decided against any military action. There was no doubt in anyone’s mind that this was the wrong decision. After losing the Uzbeks as vassals to lose the Mughals as well would simply scream out an empire in decline.

    Rebels sprung up across the Empire believing their time for independence was now. The army – still well trained and with capable leaders – managed to fight off these rebels but the situation was worrying.


    When there’s red flamey things behind your capital you know its bad


    After a year the rebellions began to die down. They were becoming less frequent and the rebels were fewer in number. This was more a result of the crushing defeats the Safavid forces were imposing on them across the Empire then anything Safi did.

    The lack of rebels was good as the tribes, who had lost most of their power under Abbas were also beginning to attempt to regain their past influence. This was a perfect opportunity for Safi to bring the Empire under control but none really believed he would do so. Instead he let much of the reformation and hard work of Abbas collapse.


    Just in case anyone had any doubt Safi proves he’s not fit to shine Abbas’ shoes


    The tribes would once again have a large say in the affairs of the Shah. Outside of Isfahan Safi had very little power and the tribes once again ruled their own lands in their own ways. Not a clever way to rule and empire the size of the Safavids.

    The Empire looked doomed and yet from the black gloom that was Safi’s reign came a small flicker of hope. A young grandson of Abbas the Great, also called Abbas was placed in charge of the Army of the Shah (which was always stationed in Isfahan nowadays). As a military leader he showed great promise – his grasp of tactics and training methods rivalled his grandfathers.


    Another Abbas to lead the Safavids to glory?


    Safi’s line used time and time again to explain away the Uzbek situation was that he simply couldn’t attack a country where there were no maps to show where to attack. It was in many ways a valid even if coward’s point. At just 18 years of age Abbas declared he would lead his forces into the Uzbek lands no matter whether they were charted or not. Even if he had to reach the fabled eastern sea he would hunt the Uzbek Khan Iman Quili Banudur to it’s shores and slay him on the cliffs.

    Talk like this inspired the new recruits and aged generals of Abbas the Great alike. Safi was left with no choice but to allow the young Abbas to move his forces towards the Uzbek border.


    Abbas moves the army to the north

  4. #144
    A well designed event there to show what's going on. Those treacherous Mughals though I like this new Abbas though and hope he gets what he deserves, which is the the throne. Long live Abbas and boo Safi.

  5. #145
    I noticed the little Conquistador hat on our new Abbas, but do Conq's get a battle penalty? Not that I'm saying he'll have any problems with inflicting revenge on all these traitors.
    "Oppurtunistic relations can hardly be kept constant. The acquaintance of honorable people, even at a distance, does not add flowers in times of warmth and does not change it's leaves in times of cold: it continues unfading over the four seasons, becomes increasingly stable as it passes through ease and danger." - Zhuge Liang, Prime Minister of Shu-Han

  6. #146
    Quote Originally Posted by Karasuman
    but do Conq's get a battle penalty?
    IIRC Conquistadors only get a battle penalty in Europe so he should be fine.

  7. #147
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    Hehe Abbas in one of em all in all people who can do anything with excellent precision!
    Have always an extra army ready incase of need! Like Russia! Damn General Winter!

  8. #148
    Four more years of Safi, that's got to hurt.

    This new Abbas could be the man to bring the Uzbeks to heel and lead the Empire to even greater heights.

  9. #149
    Quote Originally Posted by Duke of Wellington
    IIRC Conquistadors only get a battle penalty in Europe so he should be fine.
    Sweet. Let Abbas the New bring on the pain.
    "Oppurtunistic relations can hardly be kept constant. The acquaintance of honorable people, even at a distance, does not add flowers in times of warmth and does not change it's leaves in times of cold: it continues unfading over the four seasons, becomes increasingly stable as it passes through ease and danger." - Zhuge Liang, Prime Minister of Shu-Han

  10. #150
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    Didn't actually realise he might get a penalty. Either way he needed the little helmet to actually fight the Uzbeks. A lot of Terra Incognita out there!

    Abbas is certainly looking up to great things Skane

    ...your about to get another 5 years of him Ragusa and hes still causing serious problems.

  11. #151
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    Shah Safi – Into the Mist



    Shah Safi – Into the Mist (1637 – 1642)


    Next Abbas set about drawing up the declaration of war against the Uzbeks. In his letter he cited their evil actions against his grandfather as the main cause for the war and informed the Uzbek Khan Banudur that he would not rest until he was dead. Under heavy pressure from both Abbas and the other generals of Abbas the Great, Safi signed the declaration and it was sent to the Uzbeks. War had come to the Safavid Empire yet again…


    The soon to be battlegrounds of Abbas’ War - Khiva (brown) and the Uzbeks (turquoise) and (the ever blue) Safavid Empire


    The greatest challenge for Abbas was not so much winning the battles, as despite its decline in the years after his grandfather’s death the Safavid army was still one of the most feared in the world. The challenge came in fighting and keeping men supplied on the long march into the unknown. The Uzbeks had inherited the Chagatai Khanate thus giving them land deep into the east. None really knew how far this land stretched and what they might find when they got there. Rather then ponder the issue for too long Abbas simply took a map, drew a large red line into Uzbekland and ordered his army to get ready to march.


    The Safavid map of the Uzbeks and Abbas’ proposed route


    Abbas and his army marched for over a year with little rest. Constantly beating off attacks from small Uzbek forces as they pushed on through the freezing mountainous paths… if not for Abbas’ leadership they would have surely perished.

    Meanwhile the main body of the Safavid army was under the command of the great general Ferhan Khan, now almost 70 years old. He could no longer ride into the battle with the cavalry but was as wily as ever and determined to bring the Uzbeks to justice for the death of his old Shah. The young Abbas had given him renewed vigour and he would win this war if it killed him! Ferhan split up the army so as to avoid heavy losses to disease and lack of supplies (which he knew Safi wouldn’t send) and had them lay siege to the Uzbek cities in the west. As the armies marched the old man smiled briefly – it was nice to see the Safavid forces again march and bring terror to their foes.


    The Safavid war machine moves once more!


    The small pockets of Uzbek resistance fled before the Safavid army into the cities and fortresses. As they cowered in their holes Persian cannon bombarded the walls – they would not hold out for long!

    Banudur on the other hand had fled eastwards away from Abbas. Eventually after over a year and a half of the chase Abbas and his men came upon a strange outpost. It was not built in the style of the Uzbeks… nor was it manned by men who looked like Uzbeks. No one was sure quite who these people were… perhaps the fabled Mongols of Genghis Khan which had once reached Egypt?

    After a rather tense stand off it was established that they had reached China. Unfortunately for the outpost guards it was always established that they had let Banudur through the checkpoint and into China. Just as conflict was beginning to look inevitable two men carrying a large sack arrived at the other side of the outpost. They announced they were servants of Banudur who had slain him and brought him to face the justice of the Safavids (although they admitted it was hard to face justice when dead). Abbas, who had heard all those stories of great kings killing the servants of their rivals who had been betrayed them thought he may as well continue a tradition. After all he wanted to be a great Shah one day so he may as well start now. The men were thanked then executed while Banudur was fed to the dogs. Justice was done.


    Abbas’ maps of the Uzbek lands


    Abbas now set about laying siege to the lands he had discovered. In the west everything was already under Safavid control but the supply lines were stretched and Ferhan daren’t march his forces further east.

    Just as things were looking up Safi did his best to mess things up with some bad decisions at Isfahan.


    Safi tries to ruin things


    He also managed to spark some good old fashioned clan warfare with some incredibly poor diplomacy…


    Safi tries once more to spoil the party having to pay off the clans


    It cost the treasury almost 500 ducats to repair the grievances caused. Fortunately the Safavids had a lot of money but it was a heavy blow whatever way you looked at it especially considering the army would have to be reinforced after the war.

    Finally by 1640 the last Uzbek stronghold was taken and Abbas was free to enforce a peace on them. He took the region of Bukhara, famed for its wines, and had a refinery built there as well as taking 100 ducats to improve the treasury slightly. The peace could have been harsher but Banudur was dead and that was the main aim of the war as far as Abbas was concerned.

    Sadly in that same year Ferhan died. It seemed that with the murderers of Abbas the Great put to the sword he felt his time was done. He passed away in his sleep on a cold January morning after peace had been made. What became clear after his death though was that it was mainly his influence which had protected Abbas from Safi’s wrath. When Abbas returned to Isfahan instead of being greeted as a hero he was banished to Safavid South Africa (SSA).

    With few other options Abbas reluctantly accepted his fate and boarded a ship. On his arrival he organised an expedition north to see what other riches may lie in these lands. Who knew he may even carve out a kingdom of his own in Africa…


    Abbas sets about doing something useful in SSA


    On his 23rd brithday however events took a turn for the better. A general had secretly travelled to SSA to meet with Abbas. He told how the people were tired of Safi as was the army. If Abbas would return to the Empire then he would be carried to the throne at the head of the army!

    Abbas set sail the next day…

  12. #152
    What no force conversion of the Uzbek? No genereal slaughter of the Uzbek for assassinating Abbas the Great? This Safi ha by this peace condonedthe murder ofhis own father. He deserves nothing better than to be left to rot face-down in soiled clothes in a water-filled ditch in some remote corner of the Empire.

    Any plans to release the SSA as a vassal state?

    Now, at last, the Empire will have a new Abbas at the helm.

  13. #153
    Your getting osme problems =P

  14. #154
    Second Lieutenant Fingal's Avatar
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    Yes I am Yuriswe... I blame it all on Safi!

    As for the rather soft peace Ragusa if you look at 'Abbas' map of Uzbekland' you'll see in the top left a few Uzbek provinces just over some permanent incognita. They got them off Sibir before Khiva split. I'm thinking of giving them to Khiva via an edit seen as it doesn't seem to fit them still being Uzbek...

    Anyhow thats why the peace was rather limited they still had three provinces I couldn't attack so I couldn't really vassalise/force convert (besides we haven't had a real religious zealot since Mad Ismail I feel one coming up though - they're fun).

  15. #155
    An end draws near for Safi. That is some great news. But those were some bad decisions of Safi's relating to the clans etc. I do like Abbas' method of exploration.

  16. #156
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    Yeah were getting rid of Safi now Duke

  17. #157
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    Shah Abbas II – How can we win when fools can be king?



    Shah Abbas II – How can we win when fools can be king? (1642 – 1648)



    ---------------------------------------------------------------



    The Palace of the Shah 1642

    A well built man paced slowly towards the throne of the Shah. Sat perched a top it was the now snivelling figure of Safi. Once Safi had looked like a strong leader, now he was a wreck. After being racked by nerves of threats to his throne both external and internal Safi was no more fit to be ruler then the non-Shahs of old and yet still he groaned and moaned.

    “Please, please I beg mercy my cousin. Have I not always been good to you? I made you head of the army! I supported your war against the Uzbeks!”

    His pleas didn’t halt the advance of Abbas, if anything his pace towards the throne seemed to quicken. Seeing his attempts to save his life had done little Safi again opened his mouth.

    “Guards! Guards! Come save your Shah!”

    At this Abbas stopped for a second, now only 10 yards from the throne. He allowed himself a short chuckle. He knew no guards would come… the army; the people and the court were all with him. He was a hero and Safi had brought shame to the Empire. After this brief pause Abbas snatched a quick look at Safi’s face – the terror was plain to see and it was pleasing. Abbas continued to advance and now within touching distance grabbed hold of Safi by his hair and drew his scimitar as if to slay him on the throne. A small yelp emerged from Safi’s mouth.

    Abbas stared him in the eye for a few moments before throwing him to the ground in front of his throne. Abbas now turned to face Safi and slid back onto his new throne and spoke quietly but firmly.

    “No, I don’t think I will kill you today cousin. Better to let you live – you will see how a true heir of our grandfather rules the Empire.”



    ---------------------------------------------------------------



    Well not Abbas the Great but he’s still very good!


    And so Abbas II ascended to the throne of the Safavids. Safi was blinded but allowed to live out his days in a pleasant estate up in the hills of Tabriz. Abbas on the other hand had more pressing matters. Just prior to his landing news arrived that the Spanish had declared war.

    At this point in time the Safavids, despite the loss of their influence in the east were still the second greatest Empire in the world. The greatest was, without any doubt Spain. They controlled vast swathes of the Americas and Caribbean as well as chunks of the old Ottoman Empire and parts of North Africa. Their navy was unrivalled in both technology and size which would more or less limit what Abbas could achieve against them.

    In the war the first move was that of Spain. They attacked the SSA with around 10,000 men.

    Colonial war in SSA


    Fortunately for Abbas the army, despite suffering under Safi was still perhaps the finest in the world. While the English and central European countries boasted slightly more advanced muskets the Safavid use of cavalry and tactics was unprecedented and rightly feared in the west. This allowed the outnumbered Safavid garrison in the SSA to drive the Spanish back into the sea. Two years later another force of similar size suffered the same fate. It seemed the Shiite colonisers weren’t keen on living under Spanish rule.

    Meanwhile in North Africa Abbas led a 20,000 strong force to attack Cyrenaica which was held by the Spanish. The battle was short and sweet as was the assault on the fortress which fell in just a week. Abbas now had the Safavid navy in the Mediterranean sail to the port at Cyrenaica where he boarded ships and set sail for the Spanish held isle of Sicily. The journey was a hard one as all the while they had to dodge and outrun the Spanish fleet for an open sea battle would only go one way.

    The Safavids invade Sicily


    Not since 1091 had Muslim soldiers set foot on Scilly – it was an historic event and yet the expedition soon turned to disaster. Messina fell quickly to Abbas but the Spanish landed almost 20,000 men on the eastern side of the isle and defeated Abbas with ease. Abbas escaped from the isle on a small fisherman’s vessel and made it back to north Africa while 1000 of his men held out in the fortress in Messina.

    The Spanish continued their offensive with another 20,000 men assaulting Cyrenaica. A Safavid force of similar size was sent from Alexandria to deal with this new threat.


    The Spanish retaliate



    The Spanish were sent routing with remarkable speed. The better trained Persian officers dedicated to land warfare were too much for the Spanish who were more used to the seas.

    This left the war at a stalemate. The Spanish couldn’t win battles against the Safavids but the Safavids couldn’t land men in sufficient numbers to attack the Spanish holdings around the world. A peace was drawn up in 1645 handing Cyrenaica over to the Safavids and allowing Abbas’ men still trapped on Sicily to return home. The peace wasn’t a friendly one. The Spanish were embarrassed at defeat in a war they started and the Abbas felt not enough had been done to hurt the Christians.

    It was this which led Abbas to develop a new plan. Instead of attacking Spain herself he would attack her interests around the Mediterranean. Both Tripoli and Naples were at this time Spanish vassals but held no formal alliance with Spain. This allowed Abbas to attack. While this would infuriate the Spanish without breaking the truce they couldn’t interfere – a perfect plan.

    Attacking the Spanish vassals


    Tripoli fell with little resistance. A small force met the Safavids but in truth the Muslims of Tripoli felt little loyalty to Spain. They were Sunni though so the Safavids were hardly welcomed as saviours.

    The long arm of the Safavids reaches into North Africa


    Next on Abbas’ list was Naples. The Safavid fleet was moved into position and he along with 10,000 men set sail. As Naples had no armed forces at this point the conflict was predictably swift.

    Safavid Naples


    With the addition of a region in central Italy to the Empire Europe was once again becoming worried. Safi had helped calm the tense stand of developing between east and west but Abbas’ new conquests had refuelled the tensions.

    In fact rumour had it that the princes of Europe were already calling a council in Rome primarily to discuss the Safavid issue.


    ---------------------------------------------------------------



    Spot the song lyric in the title for a bonus point! (Maybe harder for all you non-UK people)

  18. #158
    'Tis a cruel man, ye are and there's nay doubt 'bout it, Shah Abbas II. Taking poor defenceless Naples like that. You need a massive fleet of galleys built at Alexandria. Can you build shipyards, yet?

  19. #159
    I can't spot the song lyric there. A compassionate move by Abbas that I don't think I would have shown in that position. He certainly is a good leader to take on the Spanish and gain lands.

  20. #160
    Don't see the song lyric, but I counter with another vague reference!

    When asked how qualified of a leader the new Abbas was, Phillip II of Macedonia replied that he was "Pretty good... not Great, but pretty good."
    "Oppurtunistic relations can hardly be kept constant. The acquaintance of honorable people, even at a distance, does not add flowers in times of warmth and does not change it's leaves in times of cold: it continues unfading over the four seasons, becomes increasingly stable as it passes through ease and danger." - Zhuge Liang, Prime Minister of Shu-Han

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