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Thread: Continued Persian AAR in GC 1521->

  1. #1
    Second Lieutenant DubCat's Avatar

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    Ok, here comes the follow-up on the 'Persian AAR in GC 1492-1521'.

    Not wanting to repeat the mistake from the last war with Oman, the Persians had now assembled quite an impressive fleet. While the main army marched south, the Persian navy engaged in a mighty sea-battle that would prove to be crucial for the outcome of the war. Taken by surprise, the Oman fleet was crushed by the Persian armada.

    Just when the Persian host was approaching Oman’s capitol, their ruler fled again towards Zanzibar, but to his horror, just after his arrival, a small Persian force arrived. The force was not strong enough to storm the walls of the hold, but large enough to enforce a blockade.

    Before long, the siege of the Oman capitol was over and a portion of the main army was sent to reinforce the troops in Zanzibar while the rest marched towards Aden, a weak nation that now had lost their only ally in the war. It would take the Persian army only a few months to completely destroy all Aden opposition. At the same time, reinforcements to relieve the troops in Zanzibar arrived and they immediately launched an assault on the small fortress. The walls would fall in the morning of the 14th day in the month of Jumaada al-Thaany in 928 (1522). Both Aden and Oman were forced to accept Persian rule, and their leaders “persuaded” to swear loyalty towards Ismael who had now been named The Victorious One by his people.

    With its enemies to the south now beaten and its aggressive neighbours in the west and north trembling with fear, Ismael turned his attention to the east were Mahmed Minya had returned from his journeys. He reported of lands were everyone was so rich that they wore gold, even on their feet. This triggered a wave of bold seafarers that sailed east to explore the fabled lands. Persian emissaries were dispatched to establish contact with the ruler of these rich lands. Over a year passed and nothing was heard from the Persian envoys. Then, one late afternoon in the year of 931 (1525), news arrived; the barbarous regent of the Mogul Empire had beheaded the whole retinue!

    Furious, Ismael swore revenge. With the discoveries of Minya and other explorers, the Persians were able to pick out a location for a small colony just south of the Mogul Empire (comment: on the western shore of India) that would later serve as a base for their forces. Shortly after the first colony, a second one was founded. The Persians encountered two small nations in this area, Hyderabad and Mysore, which both swore allegiance to the Moguls further north. These nations all had quite impressive armies, so Ismael had to build up his presence carefully not to upset the local lords. Ismael knew that the Moguls were too strong with the help of their allies, and thus he came up with a cunning scheme to bring down his sworn enemy. He started to send expensive gifts and fawning letters to the Mogul regent in order to improve their relationship. Soon, Ismael had built up a “trusting relationship” between the two nations. So, when Persian forces invaded Mysore, the Moguls comfortably turned their back to their former allies so not to upset their new “friends”. This would ultimately become the downfall of the Mogul Empire. Superiority in the fields of leadership, organisation and technology within the Persian army proved to be too much of an opponent for the disorganized Mysore militia, and after two years of fighting, Mysore yielded to Persian supremacy.

    Now the Persians controlled several large cities that could maintain the vast number of forces needed to advance on the Mogul empire, but Ismael bid his time. He built up the Persian presence in the area with care. Just when the time was right, he struck out at Hyderabad, a vassal of the Mogul Empire. This time, the Moguls could not look the other way, but their attempts to rescue their allies from destruction failed, and after a short but fierce war, Hyderabad yielded and swore allegiance towards Ismael and Persia. Now, the Mogul lords came to realise reality. They had been lead astray like silly children by precious gifts and kind words. Too late they came to comprehend Ismael’s wily tactic. Persia controlled almost the whole region, except a few coastal provinces that were under the influence of European nations. The Moguls could only watch in horror as the banners of the Persian army could be seen amassing at their borders. In the year of 944 (1537), Allah’s faithful warriors marched into the Mogul lands in what would be the beginning of the end for the once proud and feared empire.

    In the west during this time, things were quite peaceful in a Persian point of view. Persia had slowly built up their relations with its aggressive neighbours in order to focus their efforts in the east. There were a few border conflicts in the north were the Crimeans had succumbed completely to Astrakhan, which were expanding their territory in almost all directions, but by paying tribute to the Astrakhan ruler, Persia was able to uphold an unstable peace. Algeria now dominated Northern Africa trough its annexation of Morocco and Tripolitania and the vassalisation of Cyrenica. The Ottoman Empire had difficulties expanding their empire further west and north because Poland-Lithuania and Austria had become very powerful through their successful wars with Hungary and Russia. The Mamelukes sat idle, but the 922 (1517) alliance with Persia was still upheld, providing some protection if the Turks should turn their greedy eyes east again.

    In the world of the heretic Christians, Spain had become the most powerful nation through its colonies in a world that lay far, far to the west. Russia had invaded Sweden and Denmark and dominated the majority of Scandinavia, but the warring Sunni-Muslim nations surrounding it in the east and south had captured large territories and would soon threaten its very capitol. As mentioned earlier, Austria and Poland-Lithuania had become very powerful, and dominated Central and Eastern Europe while the German states squabbled over petty issues.

    The previous AAR from 1492-1521 can be found here: http://www.europa-universalis.com/fo...ML/000251.html


    [This message has been edited by DubCat (edited 19-02-2001).]

    [This message has been edited by DubCat (edited 19-02-2001).]

  2. #2
    Very good so far. Very nicely done with the monguls. Dont forget to send merchants and traders to the citys you captured. Inida is a nice prize for traders. Make a monopoly there.

  3. #3
    Field Marshal hjarg's Avatar
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    You little backstabbing bastard, you... Nice one with the Moguls
    Does Persia recive any colonists? And if you don't want to free the world from Sunni scum, it would be a good idea to colonize spice islands. Persia seems to have a perfect geographical position for that.

    Oh, and nice AAR

  4. #4
    Second Lieutenant DubCat's Avatar

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    Persia receives no settlers what so ever except from random events (I got three in total this far). The only way is to build a shipyard (or whatever it’s called in English, örlogsvarv in Swedish), then you get one per year, but at that time you are pretty far into the game because you have to have a very high tech-level.

    Where exactly is the “Spice Islands”?

  5. #5
    Sergeant zwingli's Avatar

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    Originally posted by DubCat:
    Persia receives no settlers what so ever except from random events (I got three in total this far). The only way is to build a shipyard (or whatever it’s called in English, örlogsvarv in Swedish), then you get one per year, but at that time you are pretty far into the game because you have to have a very high tech-level.

    Where exactly is the “Spice Islands”?
    Persia is Shiite. So you should get one or two settlers per year. Since you say you did not get any, you will most likely also get none with a wharf. You need - afaik - to change the colonialpower flag in the game's .inc file to get any settlers at all.

    /zwingli

  6. #6
    Field Marshal hjarg's Avatar
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    Spice islands were mostly Indonesian islands from where pepper, cinnamon, cassia, cardamom, ginger, turmeric and other spices were grown. Very lucrative trade and from what i have heard, very lucrative in EU too. Often referred as East Indies as well.

  7. #7
    Second Lieutenant DubCat's Avatar

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    Originally posted by zwingli:
    Persia is Shiite. So you should get one or two settlers per year. Since you say you did not get any, you will most likely also get none with a wharf. You need - afaik - to change the colonialpower flag in the game's .inc file to get any settlers at all.

    /zwingli
    Shiite countries get no settlers, but Sunni Muslim countries get one per year. You must have mixed them together. By building a wharf you DO get one per year. That’s a fact.

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